Question for you "Older Guys." - Page 12

   Heavy Metal Guitar   

Page 12 of 12 FirstFirst ... 23456789101112
Results 89 to 94 of 94

Thread: Question for you "Older Guys."

  1. #89


    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: King of Prussia, PA
    ME: PRS CE22
    MA: Richard Cogger Classical
    MB: Fender Bulletbass
    Rig: Mesa Mark V/TA30

    iTrader: 3 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg McCoy View Post
    To kind of extrapolate, I think instrumental guitar is a tough line to walk because you have to know how to use negative space.

    If you use too much negative space it just looks like pretentious "phrasing"/"one note can say more than two hundred" shit and if you use too little it's a wanky shredfest. There's very little instrumental stuff that strikes the right balance for me. 95% of it is either one or the other.

    I like Robin Trower, SRV, and YJM but that's about it. I like Paul Gilbert a lot, but mostly in the context of Racer X. Can't stand Vai or Satriani.

    I actually think most shred guitarists should take inspiration from instrumental stuff like John Carpenter or Tangerine Dream. The thing about instrumental music to me is that it has to be fun, and not a lot of it is.
    Gonna give a spot to my friends' band because I think you'd dig them. They used to be far more technical but they simplified their stuff for that exact reason. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s555R_6CCA8

  2. #90


    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: Herndon, VA
    ME: Jackson Soloist
    Rig: Fractal Audio Axe-FX II

    iTrader: 4 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg McCoy View Post
    If you use too much negative space it just looks like pretentious "phrasing"/"one note can say more than two hundred" shit and if you use too little it's a wanky shredfest. There's very little instrumental stuff that strikes the right balance for me. 95% of it is either one or the other.
    That balance isn't just in individual instruments, but in total arrangements. Simple two-note melody lines are totally fine if there's something interesting going on behind them.

    Also, a lot of that stuff that modern blues guitarists say about "saying it all with just one note" is complete bullshit. They play the same three stock blues licks that Albert King played 50 years ago and call it "feel", and most of them really do try to play those stock licks as fast as they can--they just suck at it. I appreciate the blues guitarists who could genuinely play it right. Buddy guy doesn't play guitar, he sings through it. BB King only played short lines around his vocals, but his playing sang just as much.

    Making simple lines work is a matter of working on the small details and doing techniques like pre-bends and vibrato that aren't showy but make all the difference.

    The ultimate question is whether you are playing music or conducting a clinic. Complex music can be great, but music isn't great simply because it's complex.

  3. #91


    Join Date: Jun 2010
    Location: Melbourne, Australia
    ME: Ibanez RGs
    MA: Cordoba Custom Flamenco
    MB: Ibanez SRs
    Rig: XXX / 5153m

    iTrader: 0

    Quote Originally Posted by jacksonplayer View Post
    That balance isn't just in individual instruments, but in total arrangements. Simple two-note melody lines are totally fine if there's something interesting going on behind them.

    Also, a lot of that stuff that modern blues guitarists say about "saying it all with just one note" is complete bullshit. They play the same three stock blues licks that Albert King played 50 years ago and call it "feel", and most of them really do try to play those stock licks as fast as they can--they just suck at it. I appreciate the blues guitarists who could genuinely play it right. Buddy guy doesn't play guitar, he sings through it. BB King only played short lines around his vocals, but his playing sang just as much.

    Making simple lines work is a matter of working on the small details and doing techniques like pre-bends and vibrato that aren't showy but make all the difference.

    The ultimate question is whether you are playing music or conducting a clinic. Complex music can be great, but music isn't great simply because it's complex.

  4. Remove Advertisements
    MetalGuitarist.org
    Advertisements
     

  5. #92


    Join Date: Jan 2012
    Location: London, UK
    ME: PRS Custom 24
    Rig: Kemper►KRK's

    iTrader: 4 (100%)

    There are a few of the 'young guns' that I really enjoy listening to their music. Aaron Marshall, Polyphia, Chon, Mateus Asato, Plini...all seem a 'cut above' to me because they do some great things musically with their chops too. The problem with most of the other younger guys is (as has been said already) they seem to be all about the technique and flawless sweeps but without having much else. People like Jason Richardson for example, the dude can play his absolute ass off, he's a beast. I certainly will never have half the technique he has, but his music doesn't do anything for me personally.

    Aaron Marshall continues to be my favourite currently though, 'The Shape of Colour' was such a perfect record and I'm still listening to it.

  6. #93


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Somerville, Ma
    ME: Suhr Modern 7
    MA: Martin MC16-GTE
    MB: Dingwall Afterburner 5
    Rig: Mesa Roadster, Recto 4x12

    iTrader: 5 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg McCoy View Post
    In all honesty I was responding to your comment on its own and not in the context of the thread, so I don't know where it fell in the overall discussion of things here.

    I don't enjoy instrumental guitar music, other than Yngwie, and even most Yngwie has vocals. So I imagine most of the discussion doesn't pertain to anything I'm familiar with.

    There's still crossover between general metal guitar and instrumental guitar, but I imagine the specifics are quite different in many places.
    Actually, I thought it was a very pertinent comment, and I agree with a lot of what you're saying.

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg McCoy View Post
    To kind of extrapolate, I think instrumental guitar is a tough line to walk because you have to know how to use negative space.

    If you use too much negative space it just looks like pretentious "phrasing"/"one note can say more than two hundred" shit and if you use too little it's a wanky shredfest. There's very little instrumental stuff that strikes the right balance for me. 95% of it is either one or the other.

    I like Robin Trower, SRV, and YJM but that's about it. I like Paul Gilbert a lot, but mostly in the context of Racer X. Can't stand Vai or Satriani.

    I actually think most shred guitarists should take inspiration from instrumental stuff like John Carpenter or Tangerine Dream. The thing about instrumental music to me is that it has to be fun, and not a lot of it is.
    And, this, SOmuch. Though, ironically, I think Satch at his very best is actually really good at the use of negative space.

    Thanks for posting that - you just explained way more succulently and concretely something that I've kind of felt on an intuitive level but never quite knew how to say.
    "They can kill you, but the legalities of eating you are a bit dicier." - David Foster Wallace

  7. #94


    Join Date: Jul 2010
    Location: Zombieland
    ME: Ibanez S 540 Ltd
    Rig: Bugera 333XL Infinium

    iTrader: 0

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg McCoy View Post
    To kind of extrapolate, I think instrumental guitar is a tough line to walk because you have to know how to use negative space.

    If you use too much negative space it just looks like pretentious "phrasing"/"one note can say more than two hundred" shit and if you use too little it's a wanky shredfest. There's very little instrumental stuff that strikes the right balance for me. 95% of it is either one or the other.

    I like Robin Trower, SRV, and YJM but that's about it. I like Paul Gilbert a lot, but mostly in the context of Racer X. Can't stand Vai or Satriani.

    I actually think most shred guitarists should take inspiration from instrumental stuff like John Carpenter or Tangerine Dream. The thing about instrumental music to me is that it has to be fun, and not a lot of it is.

    I'm pretty much like that in the sense that I don't really care for much pure/solo shred/instrumental stuff (Just Yngwie who's actually not an instrumental artist at all..it just sounds like that lol) & Vai's Passion & Warfare/Eat em & smile (with DLR) records. Did'nt really care for the Shrapnel stuff in the 80's either. (I think I've heard more of it now than I ever did back then) ...I've alway's preferred shred in the context of a band & "real" songs. Did'nt care for any of the commercially-oriented 'hair bands' with their studio-musician type guitar players either. (Extreme/Mr. Big/White Lion/Blue Murder etc..).

    The shred I do like is the linear straight-forward rip-roaring stuff that lack's "tasteful restraint", "clever arrangements/timing", "atmosphere (ie slow/boring parts)" etc ..stuff like that.. and pretty much feels spontaneous, in your face & real. A lot of shred dudes these days lack that..ie the head-on/no holds barred/balls-out approach. And I think that's probably the reason why I've always preferred the shredding dudes who play in actual bands..cuz there's no time/space for all that other shit. Play your solo, make sure it's memorable/tasty/it totally rocks & move on (think Friedman, Tommy Vetterli, Jeff Waters, James Murphy..or more recently Mike Romeo, Stefan Forte, Kristian Niemann etc..)

    Then some of them start off having oodles of natural flow/sense of melody etc just to lose it down the road, so they can come across as more "creative" & or as a "thinking musician" (frankly, the less "thinking" that goes on ....the "better" it ends up sounding....)

    Just to illustrate, here's a great example of a dude who went from totally awesome to pretty fucking tedious..


    Awesome..







    tedious..






    ^ Not saying it's bad, just that it's nothing I would'nt forget I'd ever heard a couple minutes later..

    Another great example of what I'm talking about is Dream Theater, where they went from writing memorable, awesome songs to just being over-clever & boring as fuck...
    "Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect" ~Mark Twain

    Youtube

Similar Threads

  1. Skid row "I remember you solo" question.
    By kevin25 in forum General Music Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-05-2014, 06:35 PM
  2. Netflix blog: "Hey guys, we fucked up."
    By Leon in forum Art, Movies, Books, TV & Media
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 10-11-2011, 08:12 PM
  3. For the "older" chaps on the forum... remember "Hard N Heavy"?
    By DonBot in forum General Music Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-06-2010, 06:51 PM
  4. "Kong" (Oceansize guys)...crazy/weird/wtf etc. video inside.
    By Uber_Mega in forum General Music Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-11-2008, 11:45 PM

Tags for this Thread


Fractal Audio Systems  Shred Training  Angel Vivaldi
Bowes Guitarworks  Decibel Guitars  NumbSkull Audio Production



VigLink badge