Carlos Santana and Rob Thomas on the oral history of "Smooth" - Page 4
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Thread: Carlos Santana and Rob Thomas on the oral history of "Smooth"

  1. #25


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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg McCoy View Post
    Carlos must have conveniently forgotten that his two albums for Polydor didn't sell jack shit. That was after Columbia also dropped him for not selling jack shit. I don't think Polydor was begging him to stay.

    The fact is that Carlos basically had to become a guest artist on his own fucking albums full of famous pop singers in order to sell enough records to stay afloat.

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris View Post
    Carlos: You know that mode I play in every song I've ever written? I wrote a new song where I just play it over and over again.




    Quote Originally Posted by Greg McCoy View Post
    That quote immediately brought to mind my favorite "song about the music industry":



    Quote Originally Posted by Bloody_Inferno View Post
    I was listening to Santana a hell of a lot back in the day, especially the instrumentals. I felt he started losing steam around Freedom onward, but every album has at least a few gems. I still love Europa, Love Is You, Samba Pa Ti, Moonflower etc.
    Santana was a huge influence on me, and I enjoy almost all of his work up through Shango.

    That said, he stopped giving a shit about getting better on guitar sometime around 1976. When he was working with all the fusion guys in the early '70s, he started absorbing some of that stuff and became pretty decent for awhile. He was always more lyrical than shreddy, but he and McLaughlin had a nice Miles/Coltrane contrast going on whenever they worked together. Ultimately, he just decided to start playing the same five licks over and over.

    No amount of Rob Thomas fuckwittery can ever undo this, though:



    or this (with John McLaughlin):



    or this (with Stanley Clarke):


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  3. #26


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    Holy shit, another Kevin Gilbert fan.

  4. #27


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    Quote Originally Posted by noodles View Post
    Holy shit, another Kevin Gilbert fan.
    I actually met the man, back in L.A. in the early '90s. Great guy, and a ridiculous talent. He put up with a lot of crap in the music biz and gotten taken advantage of several times, but his own uncompromising nature probably had a lot to do with why he never broke bigger.

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  6. #28


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    Quote Originally Posted by jacksonplayer View Post





    Quote Originally Posted by jacksonplayer View Post
    Santana was a huge influence on me, and I enjoy almost all of his work up through Shango.

    That said, he stopped giving a shit about getting better on guitar sometime around 1976. When he was working with all the fusion guys in the early '70s, he started absorbing some of that stuff and became pretty decent for awhile. He was always more lyrical than shreddy, but he and McLaughlin had a nice Miles/Coltrane contrast going on whenever they worked together. Ultimately, he just decided to start playing the same five licks over and over.
    Also Which is a shame as getting McLaughlin, the Chester Thompsons, and all the fusion guys was exactly the fire Santana needed to keep burning. Shango onwards there was at least some semblance of it, right up until the Sacred Fire concert. But you knew he'd gotten complacent by then.

  7. #29


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    Eh, you know, after 30-something years, Santana probably deserves his payday. I just wish he'd be open and call it what it is, you know? If you trade John McLaughlin for Rob Thomas, it's not about chasing a creative vision.
    "They can kill you, but the legalities of eating you are a bit dicier." - David Foster Wallace

  8. #30


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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew View Post
    If you trade John McLaughlin for Rob Thomas, it's not about chasing a creative vision.
    Nail. Head.
    "The greatest power one may possess -- in any situation -- is simply not to care what happens.

    "In fact, it's the only power, all others being a semblance and mockery of it. But you must also not care about possessing the power itself. So fuck it."

    Thomas Ligotti

  9. #31


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    Quote Originally Posted by noodles View Post
    Holy shit, another Kevin Gilbert fan.
    I really enjoyed Marc Bonilla's EE Ticket. An instrumental rock guitar album that sounds different to the many others in my extensive collection. Not Shrapnel at all. Though I also love many things on Shrapnel.

  10. #32


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    Quote Originally Posted by Dominic View Post
    I really enjoyed Marc Bonilla's EE Ticket. An instrumental rock guitar album that sounds different to the many others in my extensive collection.
    Same here. Kevin's production really lifted that album to another level. Marc's follow-up, American Matador is also good but misses that touch of goofy inspiration that Gilbert brought to the first album.

    Bonilla's worked on various projects since then, but it's a shame he's never put out another guitar album.

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