NCD: JHS Emperor
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Thread: NCD: JHS Emperor

  1. #1


    Join Date: Feb 2010
    Location: Laramie, Wyoming
    ME: Jackson AT Pro
    Rig: Rivera K Tre

    iTrader: 15 (100%)

    NCD: JHS Emperor

    Got this like last week. Of course right after I bought it Sweetwater started running a sale on it for ~$30 less than what I paid, but whatever, cool stuff. Worth the full price, definitely worth the sale price. I wasn't planning on putting a chorus on the board, but I ended up using the built in one on the VH-140c all the time. Which is a cool chorus, kinda close-ish to Rolands built in ones which are obviously iconic, but doesn't have a tap tempo for fine tuning. If I'm fine tuning my delay to the exact BPM of the track using a master clock pedal, doing the same thing with chorus is desirable. As far as integrated choruses go, the 140C one is sick, and is obviously not a shitty afterthought tacked on like most amps spring reverbs or whatever, since large sections of the amp are designed around it and the C in the model name is for Chorus, but it still doesn't have enough parameters.



    Besides, penguins are one of my favorite animals, JHS's whimsical graphics are hit and miss for me. Some are too hipstery. But penguins are badass, and pastel colors shouldn't just be restricted to guitars.

    Only complaints would be I wish the stereo out didn't require a breakout cable, and I wish the side out wasn't a toggle where you had to pick between either an expression pedal control or a tap tempo/master clock control. Having both would be cool. It has both, but using them is mutually exclusive. The JHS dude(s) mostly stick to the classic boss form factor though, and adding the two jacks that would have made that possible would have probably required a bigger enclosure and be more expensive, so it's not a super big deal.

    The tremolo mode is also sick. I didn't expect to use it at all, bought it mainly on its merits as a chorus pedal, but I fucking love it.

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  4. #2


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: The GrVm North
    ME: EBMM(s)
    MA: Taylor 214
    MB: Spector Legend 4
    Rig: AFX3 / KPA / MKV

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    What exactly do you use that tap tempo pedal for? That's pretty snazzy, though 152bpm isn't very br00tal of you.

  5. #3


    Join Date: Feb 2010
    Location: Laramie, Wyoming
    ME: Jackson AT Pro
    Rig: Rivera K Tre

    iTrader: 15 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris View Post
    What exactly do you use that tap tempo pedal for? That's pretty snazzy, though 152bpm isn't very br00tal of you.
    The delay pedal and now the chorus. For rhythmicly sync'ing to the rest of the track. Since finding an exact BPM with a standard rotary pot or tapping it in is never going to be dead on. It's also obviously useful for rotary speaker aspects on shit like hammond. If you have time based stuff.

    I never actually thought it was necessary 'til a few years ago. I was in the "just dial it in to whatever sounds good" camp. But Waves GTR plugins and other guitar FX plugins obviously have sync features, and there is a noticeable difference between just dialing it in casually and fine tuning it to match the track.

    It's not as useful for shred lead style delay though, which is what most people here probably mostly use delay for. Most people dial that in in mili-seconds and not in terms of note duration. For cleans and shit though it rules.

    I guess one of the most obvious contextual examples of when you would want something like that is King Crimson's Sleepless, the delay on the bassline is obviously rythmically synced to the BPM of the backing track. You can't do that on a delay without a BPM centric clock control.



    Welcome to the Jungle is the other high profile one. Doing that by dialing it in with miliseconds would take for fucking ever. It's possible, but you would need really good ears and a lot of patience. You need a BPM control and a note duration control. Obviously to this day there is a ton of hearsay on exactly how that tone was achieved, and you can do it with a minimally labelled rotary pot if you have the patience to do the math and get the exact MS parameter right, but controlling it with note length and BPM is way easier. It's never been as popular for high gain leads as dialing in a one sized fits all "forgiving jamming" lead delay though. Which is a large part of the reason why that intro still holds up so well today.


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