Excavator destroys $500,000 Hundreds of brand new Gibson Firebird X Guitars - Page 9
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Thread: Excavator destroys $500,000 Hundreds of brand new Gibson Firebird X Guitars

  1. #65


    Join Date: Oct 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocka_Rollas View Post
    Why would they twist more in a storage than elsewhere?

    Unless they are stored in direct hot sunlight in a swamp, maybe.

    Otherwise I don't see this as a concern.

    Warmoth (for example) stores hundreds if not thousands of necks (without finish) in their showcase for a long time before they are sold.
    Those aren't strung up. However, it's quite possible the Firebird X guitars in the warehouse also weren't strung up. You may be right. Even slight twisting could have been fixed by planing the fretboard in my hypothetical "celebrity rebuild" concept.

    Doesn't matter now; the broken parts might work in a messed-up art exhibit, but that's about it. I'd call the exhibit "A Musical Representation of the MBA degree." I'm jaded at the moment, since a bunch of MBAs and corporate sales/marketing geniuses are currently fucking up the company I work for.

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  3. #66


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    The funny thing here is that (at the risk of being pedantic), in spite of the Firebird X's many flaws, the classic "Gibson Headstock Break Point" vulnerability was not among them, as the necks had a volute.

    I wouldn't say the "Gibson Headstock" joke is overblown, because it definitely does happen, but if you are actually in the market for a Gibson Guitar, there are plenty where the issue was addressed. Are there still a shit ton with the flaw? Yes. But if you are buying a Gibson there are loads of options that have a volute or multipiece necks. The multipiece necks on the E2s are some of the heaviest duty constructions I've ever seen.



    Also, for those in the "I only buy RGs" crowd who joke about the Headstock breaks, it's worthwhile to note that it's not only the design that's at fault. Most "classic spec" Gibsons that are the ones they seem most intent on reissuing have Mahogany necks, which isn't as sturdy as maple. The Firebird X's had maple necks with volutes. Headstock breaks wouldn't have been an issue.


  4. #67


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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocka_Rollas View Post
    Well, many headstocks survived as far as I could see, only a few was broken. Not enough numbers for joke!
    Headstock breaks are endemic for Les Pauls, to the point where it's a running joke that it's a rite of passage for anyone gigging with one, and that the headstock is always stronger AFTER the break (if it's been well repaired) than before. I thought this was pretty universally know, but I guess not.
    "They can kill you, but the legalities of eating you are a bit dicier." - David Foster Wallace

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  6. #68


    Join Date: Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew View Post
    Headstock breaks are endemic for Les Pauls, to the point where it's a running joke that it's a rite of passage for anyone gigging with one, and that the headstock is always stronger AFTER the break (if it's been well repaired) than before. I thought this was pretty universally know, but I guess not.


    I have a '92 Standard that I gig with, it was knocked off a stand and suffered a headstock break, and it sounds better than it did before. I figured it was just a right of passage.

    One piece necks with a tilt back headstock are just begging to be broken. It's the grain run out at the headstock break (heh) angle that causes the issue. It's why most builders use a scarf joint.
    Noodles

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  7. #69


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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew View Post
    Headstock breaks are endemic for Les Pauls, to the point where it's a running joke that it's a rite of passage for anyone gigging with one, and that the headstock is always stronger AFTER the break (if it's been well repaired) than before. I thought this was pretty universally know, but I guess not.
    I know this 100%

  8. #70


    Join Date: Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocka_Rollas View Post
    I know this 100%
    In that case, then, the joke about headstocks breaking was a pretty funny one, I thought.

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