New Custom Space Age Ergonomic Guitar Throne Day - Page 4
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Thread: New Custom Space Age Ergonomic Guitar Throne Day

  1. #25


    Join Date: Feb 2010
    Location: Laramie, Wyoming
    ME: Jackson AT Pro
    Rig: Rivera K Tre

    iTrader: 15 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Drew View Post
    Been thinking of doing that myself, actually, since in the space I have to work in, the walls themselves really don't lend themselves to bass trapping, and low end response is tough to gauge, as is ambience, in my current mixes.

    Shit, ambience I could probably handle well enough just with some of that auralax foam stuff, it won't do much for the low end, but it'll deaden reflections a lot. I'm embarrassed to be just realizing that now, but I didn't realize how hard it was to really gauge ambience until working on that acoustic project with my dad and uncle last winter/this spring, and I've done very little mixing since.
    You know, when I went in I was like, "I'm gonna use as little room treatment as possible, I don't really believe in that stuff that much".

    And now I'm like, "Make this room as dead as possible".

    It depends on a variety of stuff obviously, conventional wisdom is use some of the pricey specially designed stuff for your main treatment, but since I have a lot of space to cover I just use the shit from Amazon that is $20 for a pack of 12.

    I definitely hear a very positive difference in terms of being able to focus on things after getting rid of reflections as much as possible.

    I think treating the ceiling partly depends on how high your ceiling is and whether your floor is reflective of course. I had rugs on the floor originally, but shit just got dirty and painted concrete is so much easier to clean.

    I say even if you can't afford to do your entire room with the "top pro" level brands do it with some of the moderate priced stuff.

    And I've gotta say, once you buy the moderate priced stuff and start treating shit with it, and you see other pictures of "pro" studios you'll be like, "Holy shit, they are using the exact same $20 for a 12 pack amazon foam I am.

    There are several trendy djent videos I've seen recently where I've noticed they are using the exact same cheap stuff as me. As well as some of the Reverb "show your space" bits. Can't blame them, it's a good choice. I like it, think it's a great deal. Especially if you have a lot of space to cover. Handles reflections pretty well. If you want more than like, spot treatment, not many people can afford a hundred bucks for a square foot.

    I read some of Mixerman's shit recently too, and I like his "doesn't matter how much it costs, whatever works" philosophy about just bringing in rugs and tapestries on shit that people absolutely love the sound of.

    Been very happy with this stuff. https://www.amazon.com/stores/page/0...d-4a14abd5e535

    Especially if you are going to cut it to get the coverage you want. Cutting acoustic foam neatly is fucking hard, I'm not cutting expensive stuff to fit around the light fixtures on the ceiling.

    Of course standard disclaimer about "that stuff is best for flutter echo and reflections", but even killing as much as possible of that is noticeable IMO.

    It's more noticeable in longer rooms with high ceilings of course. So YMMV. But it's like, $20 for a 12 pack. You can get 3 and even if you don't hear a difference you aren't out that much money. Even if it doesn't affect the acoustics, which I doubt will be the case, it certainly looks cool.

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  3. #26


    Join Date: Feb 2010
    Location: Laramie, Wyoming
    ME: Jackson AT Pro
    Rig: Rivera K Tre

    iTrader: 15 (100%)

    Also, for adhesive, 3M Super 77 is the way to go. I was originally going to use T pins, but I don't find them secure enough. Super 77 is pretty strong shit, you can definitely peel them off but you might have residue, so a lot of people glue them to a separate panel and then mount that with screws or something. If the backing is light enough you can even do pedalboard style velcro mounting, which I've seen some people do. I did it straight to the walls of course, because they didn't have paint or spackle anyways, but there's all kinds of methods.

    As far as like, being worried the cheaper stuff isn't as good as name brand. I got a pack of these and honestly putting them side by side you can't tell that shit apart. Basically the same thing.



    Auralex's expensive stuff is obviously different and higher quality, but for the 1' x 1' panels? The Foamily shit is awesome value. I wouldn't be surprised if they were made at the same place.

  4. #27


    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: Herndon, VA
    ME: Jackson Soloist
    Rig: Fractal Audio Axe-FX II

    iTrader: 4 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg McCoy View Post
    My main concern about your studio is that your video monitor isn't large enough.

    For the record--my studio is now in a shit little bedroom with hardwood floors that's full of acoustic oddities. I'm just choosing to mix around it.

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  6. #28


    Join Date: Feb 2010
    Location: Laramie, Wyoming
    ME: Jackson AT Pro
    Rig: Rivera K Tre

    iTrader: 15 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by jacksonplayer View Post
    My main concern about your studio is that your video monitor isn't large enough.

    For the record--my studio is now in a shit little bedroom with hardwood floors that's full of acoustic oddities. I'm just choosing to mix around it.
    It's someone's outdated TV. All the elderly neighbors up here think just because I am a "young person" I know everything about technology, so they'll call in like, the middle of the fucking night and be like, "MY PRINTER IS ON FIRE".

    One of the ones I had done contracting shit before ordered a new TV, and they were neither tech savvy or strong enough to get it on their wall mounted set up, so they gave me their old one.

    Usually this is actually a pretty bad arrangement for me, because I have to spend like, three hours explaining to highly strung old people why their 20 year old technology isn't compatible with newly released formats because being "neighborly" is important.

    This same neighbor is a fucking nightmare actually. She's a highly strung lady from arkansas with a vacation home here and treats me like an indentured IT servant, once she called me over because her DVD player wasn't working. And I get over there and all the old ladies in the neighborhood are sitting on her couch and it's some sort of get together and they want to watch Brokeback Mountain on DVD, and she's like, "WHY IS THIS NOT WORKING". And I explain to her that the DVD is a Blu-Ray, and she's trying to play it in a regular DVD player, and she is just like, "NONSENSE, THOSE ARE JUST THE LIES OF THE TECH INDUSTRY". So she says some shit about "back in my day...." and grabs the Brand new Brokeback Mountain Blu-ray from me and says,

    "I bet it's not playing because the disc is dirty"

    And she just starts like, rapidly rubbing the bottom on some denim throw pillow and starts like, sandpapering the shit out of this disc on her throw pillow, and she hands it back to me and the bottom is so gouged that even if she had a Blu-Ray player it wouldn't read. I don't remember how I got out of that one, it's an art form having to get away without explaining to the old person they are just terrible with technology. Usually after I make up some excuses as to why it's not working that don't mention "it's not working because you literally don't understand technology" she'll insist we do a conference call to tech support together so she can get to the bottom of the tech industries lies, and some dude in an Indian Call center will talk for like, 30 minutes, and after 30 minutes she'll be like, "I'm sorry, I didn't understand a word you said, you'll have to start from the beginning."

    She also once blew up a $1200 5.1 Receiver she had just bought. She called about it making a loud popping noise every time she turned it on, and she couldn't figure it out. So I spent like, four hours there trying to get to the bottom of it, because the situation makes no sense, and then I think to check the speakers, and her husband, who is dean of agriculture at some university and thinks any technology more advanced than a wheelbarrow is the work of the devil had the speakers hooked up on every single channel so the two leads are connected in the same terminal instead of in their proper terminals and I had to explain that the loud popping was probably some internal protective circuit and the fact that she tried to turn it on like, 200 times with 5.1 channels of short circuits probably permanently fried something because it wasn't turning on any more. So both her and her husband then go on some two hour rant about the decline of society as a whole and how they really should have had a clearly worded warning on the box in a prominent spot to not hook up the speakers like that.

    She insists that any AV set up she has has to have her old VHS player hooked up in case she wants to watch a 9 VHS box set from 1992 on bears catching salmon in alaska on the off chance her grand children visit and want to watch 9 VHS worth of bears standing in alaskan rivers waiting for salmon to jump into their mouths. So I'll have to figure out a series of convoluted conversions to get a coaxial signal to HDMI and she won't let me leave the house until the gloriously warped image of a bear standing in an alaskan river waiting for a salmon to jump in its mouth fills the screen.

    She also has this dobro on her wall as part of her decor (along with a full sized dead bear pelt and all kinds of other rich person folksy stuff) and once she called me over to tune it so one of her grandchildren could play it after she found out I had went to college for music, and I went over and quickly realized that, although it may have been a playable dobro at one time, not only had someone used a hot glue gun on the tuning pegs so they wouldn't move, someone (probably her husband) had literally sawed the top off, bolted it to the fucking wall, and then re-attached the top, so even if it had been playable at one time, there was no way it was now. And at this point I know that if I explain the real reason her shit is fucked she won't accept it, and there will be like three hours of phone calls in which people who are in no way responsible for her dobro situation get severely browbeaten for the current state of the world, so I'm just like, "I'm sorry, this is an indian dobro, they haven't taught me to tune one of those yet, it's sort of a lost art". That was actually a two for one trip, she also wanted to know why her laptop wasn't connecting to the internet and it surprisingly turned out the reason was they were not paying an ISP, their house wasn't even connected to the internet, and she fundamentally misunderstood how the internet works.

    So the big screen may or may not have been worth it.

  7. #29


    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: Herndon, VA
    ME: Jackson Soloist
    Rig: Fractal Audio Axe-FX II

    iTrader: 4 (100%)

    Just play some of your music for her, and I'll bet she never invites you over again. Problem solved!

    On the other hand, I'm starting to feel myself drift into tech geezerhood with every passing year.

  8. #30


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Somerville, Ma
    ME: Suhr Modern 7
    MA: Martin MC16-GTE
    MB: Squier 5 string P-bass
    Rig: Mark V

    iTrader: 5 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg McCoy View Post
    You know, when I went in I was like, "I'm gonna use as little room treatment as possible, I don't really believe in that stuff that much".

    And now I'm like, "Make this room as dead as possible".

    It depends on a variety of stuff obviously, conventional wisdom is use some of the pricey specially designed stuff for your main treatment, but since I have a lot of space to cover I just use the shit from Amazon that is $20 for a pack of 12.

    I definitely hear a very positive difference in terms of being able to focus on things after getting rid of reflections as much as possible.

    I think treating the ceiling partly depends on how high your ceiling is and whether your floor is reflective of course. I had rugs on the floor originally, but shit just got dirty and painted concrete is so much easier to clean.

    I say even if you can't afford to do your entire room with the "top pro" level brands do it with some of the moderate priced stuff.

    And I've gotta say, once you buy the moderate priced stuff and start treating shit with it, and you see other pictures of "pro" studios you'll be like, "Holy shit, they are using the exact same $20 for a 12 pack amazon foam I am.

    There are several trendy djent videos I've seen recently where I've noticed they are using the exact same cheap stuff as me. As well as some of the Reverb "show your space" bits. Can't blame them, it's a good choice. I like it, think it's a great deal. Especially if you have a lot of space to cover. Handles reflections pretty well. If you want more than like, spot treatment, not many people can afford a hundred bucks for a square foot.

    I read some of Mixerman's shit recently too, and I like his "doesn't matter how much it costs, whatever works" philosophy about just bringing in rugs and tapestries on shit that people absolutely love the sound of.

    Been very happy with this stuff. https://www.amazon.com/stores/page/0...d-4a14abd5e535

    Especially if you are going to cut it to get the coverage you want. Cutting acoustic foam neatly is fucking hard, I'm not cutting expensive stuff to fit around the light fixtures on the ceiling.

    Of course standard disclaimer about "that stuff is best for flutter echo and reflections", but even killing as much as possible of that is noticeable IMO.

    It's more noticeable in longer rooms with high ceilings of course. So YMMV. But it's like, $20 for a 12 pack. You can get 3 and even if you don't hear a difference you aren't out that much money. Even if it doesn't affect the acoustics, which I doubt will be the case, it certainly looks cool.
    Do you happen to know if that stuff is flame-retardant? That would be my biggest concern. Not that I expect there to be much open flame in that room (barring my fiery licks, of course), but the last thing you want to do is cover your walls with something that'll go up like tinder if it hits a spark.

    My plan, actually, having spent some time looking at my room last night, is to flip the orientation. The way it's set up right now is kind of a product of the fact there are no outlets on what's now the back wall (not up to code, but grandfathered), but the current back wall has a door into my living room in one (angled) corner, and a little nook with a closet in the other. No symmetry, tough/impossible to bass trap the rear corners. If I just rely on a long extension cord for the time being and then long term have an electrician buddy add an outlet for me, though, I can have the way-more-symmetrical current-front wall as a rear wall (there's a small corner cut out as well, but it's close), trap the corners/possibly top, center the couch on the rear wall, and then do some spot-treatment for flutter with tiles like these.

    My plan is to just grab some 2'x4" sheets of Owens Corning 703 and build my own bass traps, but these tiles could be useful for flutter, especially along the long wall with my guitars hanging (the other side is a row of windows, so there's nothing I can do there).
    "They can kill you, but the legalities of eating you are a bit dicier." - David Foster Wallace

  9. #31


    Join Date: Feb 2010
    Location: Laramie, Wyoming
    ME: Jackson AT Pro
    Rig: Rivera K Tre

    iTrader: 15 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Drew View Post
    Do you happen to know if that stuff is flame-retardant? That would be my biggest concern. Not that I expect there to be much open flame in that room (barring my fiery licks, of course), but the last thing you want to do is cover your walls with something that'll go up like tinder if it hits a spark.

    My plan, actually, having spent some time looking at my room last night, is to flip the orientation. The way it's set up right now is kind of a product of the fact there are no outlets on what's now the back wall (not up to code, but grandfathered), but the current back wall has a door into my living room in one (angled) corner, and a little nook with a closet in the other. No symmetry, tough/impossible to bass trap the rear corners. If I just rely on a long extension cord for the time being and then long term have an electrician buddy add an outlet for me, though, I can have the way-more-symmetrical current-front wall as a rear wall (there's a small corner cut out as well, but it's close), trap the corners/possibly top, center the couch on the rear wall, and then do some spot-treatment for flutter with tiles like these.

    My plan is to just grab some 2'x4" sheets of Owens Corning 703 and build my own bass traps, but these tiles could be useful for flutter, especially along the long wall with my guitars hanging (the other side is a row of windows, so there's nothing I can do there).
    I believe it is, I called the company and they said it was, and they have a ton of reviews, there is certainly some not so good stuff out there, but after a lot of looking I've been satisfied with the foamily stuff. There's obviously *a lot* of people in audio using the foamily stuff. The density and formulation of the foam is super similar to the Auralex ones (which are of course one of the cheapest products Auralex offers).

    Of course the flutter echo tiles are the least "hard to do" bit of treatment. For anything more serious, like bass traps, you are probably better off DIY or buying something more expensive. The ultra absorbtion tiles Auralex makes are also another thing entirely than the ridged reflection tiles. The ridged reflection tiles aren't really thought of as the "frontline" of treatment.

    It also depends on room size and room mode and all of that stuff of course. The Auralex ones are slightly deeper. If you are only doing like 12-24 tiles in a smaller room the Auralex ones might be preferrable, but I wanted to cover a much larger space, so the Foamily ones worked for my needs.

    In terms of mounting them 3m Super 77 (which is of course also flammable, like the foam, so be extra careful installing ) is the way to go. It depends on what kind of paint and spackle you have or if you thought you were ever going to redo it anyways or whatever, but I wouldn't say it's impossible to clean or peel off.

    Luckily, the measurements for both sound absorbtion and fire resistance are technical figures, so you can call pretty much any reputable foam company and compare.

    There's also a lot of other considerations, including how you are mounting them. The Auralex ones being more expensive means that most people don't mount them directly to the walls, which means there is extra expense and all kinds of extra hassles.

    For the flutter echo/killing reflections bit I think they are fine. But most people agree that isn't the main front of treatment anyways. In a big room it's certainly noticeable though.

    For doing a lot of square footage on a ceiling I think the Foamily ones are a good choice. There's of course a ridiculous amount of stuff to look at though. Some of the cheaper options are definitely total shit. I'm sure Gear Slutz has a huge range of threads on the subject.

    Part of the reason I wanted such a large area of coverage was because the room was large (long/high ceilings), I use big speakers that aren't in the "modern nearfield" format, and I like lots of lush Scorpions "Love at First Sting" style reverb over modern, drier records. Using that much reverb in particular, it helps to kill as many reflections as possible. If your situation doesn't need such a large area treated, you might be better off shelling out more for the auralex ones if you are planning on only buying one pack.

    Of course, needless to say, the fact that it's something you are going to be affixing/gluing to things yourself, or cutting yourself is a consideration. It's not out of the question you will fuck up a couple times while getting the method down. As is the consideration if you want to keep it permanently. Which all gave the foamliy ones a slight edge in my case.

    None of the stuff is perfectly fire safe though, although some is certainly safer than others, I have two fire extinguishers in the room ready to go just in case.

    Depends on your place too. In Wyoming/Montana, most of the walls are already built sturdy enough for winter that the insulation and materials are more suitable for sound than something you would find in like, an old Florida apartment. Exterior walls are usually slightly more suitable than interior ones as a general rule.

    Then there's all kinds of shit like, windows shouldn't be at reflection points and all that. Mind boggling amount of stuff really. The vast majority of studios, even pro ones, can only do so much. Because it's like, "What if I still want shelves in here to organize things?".

    The foamily stuff definitely works though, once you get some of it going you can hear it with the "walk in a room and clap" method.

  10. #32


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Santa Clara, CA
    ME: Rich Mahogany
    MA: Godin A6 Ultra
    MB: SR500
    Rig: Massive/Boobies

    iTrader: 16 (100%)

    I think I went the total other direction. I found a chair by Serta (same company that does mattresses), big and padded and comfy, and just didn't install the arms


    But yeah, that room is nice! Wood and warm colors are the way to go.

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