Skyscraper Guitars Floyd Rose Intonation Tool - Page 2
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Thread: Skyscraper Guitars Floyd Rose Intonation Tool

  1. #9


    Join Date: Oct 2013
    Location: Brit in Munich, Germany
    ME: Ibanez RG 550
    MB: Sandberg Ken Taylor 5
    Rig: Diezel Herbert

    iTrader: 0

    Just listen to this, by the band Skyscraper instead:




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  3. #10


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Grays, England
    ME: Caparison/Parker
    Rig: Sweet FA

    iTrader: 7 (100%)

    I'll be interested to see how you get on Garrett.

    I keep meaning to try one of these https://redbishop.jp/EN_ACCU-LOCATOR.html
    I'm so metal I shit bats

  4. #11


    Join Date: Oct 2013
    Location: Brit in Munich, Germany
    ME: Ibanez RG 550
    MB: Sandberg Ken Taylor 5
    Rig: Diezel Herbert

    iTrader: 0

    Those lads really need some brand consultancy from native speakers, like:



    I struggle to imagine British guitarists saying "'Pass me your Red Bishop, mate!"

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  6. #12


    Join Date: Feb 2010
    Location: Laramie, Wyoming
    ME: Jackson AT Pro
    Rig: Rivera K Tre

    iTrader: 15 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post
    I'll be interested to see how you get on Garrett.

    I keep meaning to try one of these https://redbishop.jp/EN_ACCU-LOCATOR.html
    Hadn't seen those, if this product is a total piece of shit and I have to return it I'll look into it.

    That's exactly the same as the Ibanez design actually, for the edge ones, it looks like Ibanez licensed these guys work or something.

  7. #13


    Join Date: Feb 2010
    Location: Laramie, Wyoming
    ME: Jackson AT Pro
    Rig: Rivera K Tre

    iTrader: 15 (100%)

    This showed up. Using it right now.

    Seems pretty good so far. My one complaint is that in terms of the screws, I wish they would have used thicker more substantial ones, because the one connecting the foot to the middle piece sheared off on the 3rd string. If they had gone up a size or two, I don't think that would have happened.

    The good news is that the screw was the part that broke, and not the machined parts. It's hard to tell the workmanship on something so small, but the orange parts are all pretty solid. It rocks side to side a bit when it's engaged, but that's the case on all these tools. You can only make them so heavy duty in such a small form factor.

    Would be interested in AB'ing it with the one James posted.

    Having the screw break wasn't that big a deal though. Cheap screws shear often, and these are really small ones. Replaced it and will finish intonating the guitar. The actual machined bits seem pretty good so far. If the screws occasionally need replacement that's no big deal. They are small screws and guitar strings can exert ~20lbs of force.

  8. #14


    Join Date: Feb 2010
    Location: Laramie, Wyoming
    ME: Jackson AT Pro
    Rig: Rivera K Tre

    iTrader: 15 (100%)



    Brief Review:

    It's not perfect, but it works well. Obviously there are some drawbacks. It's secure in the direction parrallel to the bolt/saddle but wobbly from side to side, but they are all like that. If I had seen the one James had posted I might have went for that instead.

    There are three machined pieces, the two anchoring pieces and the middle piece. Those seem very strong, though of course I've only used it for less than a day.

    The screws, of which there are two (as well as a guide rail), are kind of cheap. The hex adjustment one (same size as the standard saddle hex, which is good) is ok. The stock screw affixing the part that goes in the saddle to the middle part is pretty weak. It can take like the lower tension strings, but mine sheared off on the third string. Replaced it with a higher quality screw I had on hand, no problem. Unless they changed the design, I recommend doing that right away. Third string is usually the highest tension one you have. I don't know what mine was exactly, but sometimes they are around 16-19 lbs or something.

    The upside of the screw shearing off was I read a review on amazon that says the ultra thin foot that goes in the saddle behind the block can bend if you aren't careful. I doubt that's an issue, maybe they improved the design. It was a good sign that the screw broke before anything bent. It appears to be high grade aircraft grade aluminum stuff.

    Orange finish looks great, but you are obviously going to scratch off some of it right off the bat. Especially on the part you slip into the saddle behind the block.

    I think the biggest flaw was not making it a little bigger. It's obviously tiny. I think even doing it 120% of the size it is and using thicker screws would be a good upgrade.

    The side to side wobbling is most likely a drawback that is going to happen on any of these products, to prevent it would require clamp pads on the side, so I don't think you'll find one that doesn't wobble. The Ibanez one and the other one would have the same problem.

    If you have a lot of Schaller trems it seems like a good buy, there's only two designs I've seen. Although I'll have to see how it holds up over a longer period of time. If you only have standard floyds, the key is less than half the price and easier to use. Although some may prefer this design.

    You will certainly get more accurate intonation than doing Schaller ones without it.

  9. #15


    Join Date: Feb 2015
    Location: NY, USA
    ME: Kramer Baretta
    MA: PRS Angelus Alex Lifeson

    iTrader: 0

    Thanks to this thread, I decided to check out the Red Bishop ACCU-LOCATOR/Intonation Adjuster for Floyd Rose, Ibanez EDGE, Schaller, GOTOH 1996T

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07NST2LSB



    I changed the FU-Tone brass block in my Lynch Sunburst Tiger, back to the stock block, because in this one guitar, it made the guitar too bright. My other guitars, including other Lynch guitars, have the FU-Tone brass block and it significantly enhanced the sound in those guitars. In this one guitar, it sounds better without the large brass block. After putting the bridge back together, I took a photo of the original saddle locations, and got as close as I could without using any tools to get it close.

    I knew that I was ordering the Accu-Locator, so I waited for it to show up and test it on this guitar.

    It showed up yesterday, and my first impression was that it was made really well. Has a little weight to it. It seems really well made.

    I took out the Tiger and used the accu-locator to set the intonation. After one use, I am completely sold. I can say that I will never use "The Key" ever again. I've been using "The Key" for many years and it did a great job most of the time. The problem arises when the Floyd is close to the body. Since it attaches to the string locking screws, which are under the plate, there is little room to fit it on some floyds. Another "issue" is that it pushes the locking screw down, making the note sharp. So, you have to adjust the tuning and get it right after you install it, and tune the string again when you remove it.

    None of these pitfalls happen with the Accu-locator. It rides on top, and not on the locking screws. It connects to the base plate, and inserts into the saddle behind the lock block. Installs in seconds, without having to change anything. You unlock the locking nut. Tune the strings. Connect it. Loosen the intonation lock screw, then use the tool to tune the string. If you connect it with enough tension, the string is already in tune. Then you check the intonation. Make adjustments using the tool using the large blue wheel, which makes it very easy. Much easier than the screw on The Key. Tune the string after any adjustment via the neck tuners. Tighten the intonation screw, and the access to it is easy because the tool makes sure you have slot to fit the allen key to tighten it. No need to retune the string after removing it, since you locked the saddle in place. But, being anal, I checked anyway, and it was spot on.

    Intonation with The Key could take 10 minutes, especially if there is little room, or it pops off on some Floyd-like trem systems. I did the intonation in under 4 minutes with the Accu-locator. No problems whatsoever. I am thrilled with this tool. I doubt I will be using the key in the future. This is my new go-to intonation tool.

    Thanks to this thread, I have a new tool that not only works on Floyd Rose trems, but others also. Thanks!!!!

  10. #16


    Join Date: Feb 2010
    Location: Laramie, Wyoming
    ME: Jackson AT Pro
    Rig: Rivera K Tre

    iTrader: 15 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by lespauled View Post
    Thanks to this thread, I decided to check out the Red Bishop ACCU-LOCATOR/Intonation Adjuster for Floyd Rose, Ibanez EDGE, Schaller, GOTOH 1996T

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07NST2LSB



    I changed the FU-Tone brass block in my Lynch Sunburst Tiger, back to the stock block, because in this one guitar, it made the guitar too bright. My other guitars, including other Lynch guitars, have the FU-Tone brass block and it significantly enhanced the sound in those guitars. In this one guitar, it sounds better without the large brass block. After putting the bridge back together, I took a photo of the original saddle locations, and got as close as I could without using any tools to get it close.

    I knew that I was ordering the Accu-Locator, so I waited for it to show up and test it on this guitar.

    It showed up yesterday, and my first impression was that it was made really well. Has a little weight to it. It seems really well made.

    I took out the Tiger and used the accu-locator to set the intonation. After one use, I am completely sold. I can say that I will never use "The Key" ever again. I've been using "The Key" for many years and it did a great job most of the time. The problem arises when the Floyd is close to the body. Since it attaches to the string locking screws, which are under the plate, there is little room to fit it on some floyds. Another "issue" is that it pushes the locking screw down, making the note sharp. So, you have to adjust the tuning and get it right after you install it, and tune the string again when you remove it.

    None of these pitfalls happen with the Accu-locator. It rides on top, and not on the locking screws. It connects to the base plate, and inserts into the saddle behind the lock block. Installs in seconds, without having to change anything. You unlock the locking nut. Tune the strings. Connect it. Loosen the intonation lock screw, then use the tool to tune the string. If you connect it with enough tension, the string is already in tune. Then you check the intonation. Make adjustments using the tool using the large blue wheel, which makes it very easy. Much easier than the screw on The Key. Tune the string after any adjustment via the neck tuners. Tighten the intonation screw, and the access to it is easy because the tool makes sure you have slot to fit the allen key to tighten it. No need to retune the string after removing it, since you locked the saddle in place. But, being anal, I checked anyway, and it was spot on.

    Intonation with The Key could take 10 minutes, especially if there is little room, or it pops off on some Floyd-like trem systems. I did the intonation in under 4 minutes with the Accu-locator. No problems whatsoever. I am thrilled with this tool. I doubt I will be using the key in the future. This is my new go-to intonation tool.

    Thanks to this thread, I have a new tool that not only works on Floyd Rose trems, but others also. Thanks!!!!
    Sick! I want to try one of those, Skyscraper is pretty good though. They both work fundamentally the same way, but the Red Bishop ones do look a little heftier.

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