NGD: Parker-ish Build (Bumblefoot content) - Page 3
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Thread: NGD: Parker-ish Build (Bumblefoot content)

  1. #17


    Join Date: Aug 2009
    Location: South Jersey
    ME: Fender Telecasters
    MA: Emerald X20 Artisan
    MB: STR LS-648
    Rig: Mk IVa / Hartke HyDrive 2

    iTrader: 1 (100%)

    That is fucking crazy cool! I sooo want to play that guitar Man that looks like so much fun and it is gorgeous besides. You did good my friend, that is sweet I would usually say at this point, "play the frets off her" but play her 'til she wears out!
    "Oh, those jazz guys are just making that stuff up!" - Homer J. Simpson

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  3. #18


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: London ONT
    ME: PRS
    MB: VM Jazz
    Rig: JCM800

    iTrader: 1 (100%)

    Holy moly.
    ________________________________________
    Needs Sleep

  4. #19


    Join Date: Jun 2009
    Location: Cph Airport
    ME: '87 Duesenberg
    Rig: MP-2 + TSR-24S + Vortex

    iTrader: 0

    Very neat
    But hey, what happened to the double neck build we talked about..

    Curious about the 6061 alu slab; why did you pick this specific type of aluminum?
    While I'm not fully into all grades of alu, I assume it's fairly close to 6075, which I know better.
    Know Thy Self. Know Thy Law. Do What Thou Wilt

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  6. #20


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Kitchen/Laundry Room
    ME: Ironing Board
    MA: Laundry Mangle
    MB: Cascade Dish Detergent
    Rig: Washing Machine

    iTrader: 2 (100%)

    Thanks again, folks!

    Quote Originally Posted by Suho View Post
    Very nice. I'm envious, of how the build itself turned out, but even more so of the fact you had the time to pour into this.
    Thanks!

    This ended up being surprisingly economical, timewise. The initial inspiration came from a Bumblefoot thread on here and according to the date stamps, looks like I bought the lumber in early August.

    The woodworking part was kind of a culmination of stuff I've been working at for a while. I've had a Parker CAD I've been working at for a while when things were slow at work or at night before I got to sleep, the neck profile I had from a while back for a different build I was working on, the pickup routes came from an Ibanez I sketched up some time ago, etc.

    So yeah, that helped a lot. The woodwork itself was fairly modest.

    The real ball buster was the fretboard. I'd consider doing one of these again but I'd have to rethink the fretboard part. THAT was just raw elbow grease, sitting at the bench for hours doing the same thing over and over.

    Quote Originally Posted by jim777 View Post
    That is fucking crazy cool! I sooo want to play that guitar Man that looks like so much fun and it is gorgeous besides. You did good my friend, that is sweet I would usually say at this point, "play the frets off her" but play her 'til she wears out!
    I can relate to that sentiment. I saw that Bumblefoot vid and started replaying the Pitts Minnemann album and was like "fuck, i NEED a fretless just to try out" but the options are so good thin, I said "welp, the only way I'm going to get my hands on one is to make one, so hop to it", which had a LOT to do with the pace this ended up getting done. 2.5ish months and my ergo thing took at least two YEARS

    Quote Originally Posted by vansinn View Post
    Very neat
    But hey, what happened to the double neck build we talked about..

    Curious about the 6061 alu slab; why did you pick this specific type of aluminum?
    While I'm not fully into all grades of alu, I assume it's fairly close to 6075, which I know better.
    I'm so early in the fretless thing to say with certainty that I'd need to have both necks at the ready, and this ended up being a budget conscious build, and double necks sounded like double the price for the expensive parts (hardware, electronics, etc) and also double the work. Still may be in the cards though.

    I know fuckall about aluminum I went to the supply place, looked at the menu, 6061 was at the top of the list based on commonality, found a piece of 1/4" flat and flex tested it since I knew it was still going to be nearly a full 1/4" thick down the center after I was done, that'd give me an approximation of rigidity.

    I'm happy with it from a stability perspective, it seems to be prone to light scuffing but I don't know how common/uncommon that is. I'd maybe consider stainless if I made a second one. I was also thinking about a sheet of stainless or aluminum curved and glued overtop of a wood board as an option.
    Argbadh - RHLC©

  7. #21


    Join Date: Feb 2013
    Location: Capital of NY
    ME: 80s Carruthers strat
    MA: 90's era Fender 12 string
    MB: Ibanez ATK300 (MIK)
    Rig: Danelectro Honeytone

    iTrader: 5 (100%)

    Did you cut the cnc part at your work or do you have the equipment at your home/ workshop? Just curious.
    "40 is the new 80." - jaxadam

  8. #22


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Kitchen/Laundry Room
    ME: Ironing Board
    MA: Laundry Mangle
    MB: Cascade Dish Detergent
    Rig: Washing Machine

    iTrader: 2 (100%)

    The CNC is in my home shop. It's a Shapeoko 3XXL, which I got based on seeing a couple builds on SSO and subsequently watching a lot of videos online. I've had it for a year this past August.

    I've been drawing in CAD for about 14 years and SOME form of 3D drawing for the last... 10ish? The 3D stuff had been kinda rudimentary but all the CAD work was done 1:1 scale to print up blueprints so that I could print them out (usually at Kinkos or OfficeMax), cut them out and glue them to hardboard to make templates.

    That's the main way I've been making stuff for the last several years, with stacks and stacks of templates I'd cut copies of with different pickup/hardware configurations and I'd source the pickup templates from places online. That worked alright but templating out a new design was cumbersome and with the way router bearings bind up, you'll inevitably wreck a template and you either had to make or buy new ones. That gets expensive, VERY time consuming and really frustrating when you are midway through a project and have to wait another week for a template to come in, or you spend several hours cleaning/hiding spots where the router skipped.

    I've wanted to go CNC since the mid-2000s, but the technology just wasn't there. The machines were expensive, enormous and you had to do a LOT of manual programming on your own. I'd check back every couple years and it was getting better but still, the only affordable units were from places like AliExpress with little guarantee of what you were getting and even less certainty on how you were going to program it, or DIY building the machine yourself which was way over my head.

    The Shapeoko was the first unit I got acquainted with that was assembled and shipped from the US, had a reasonable footprint, shipped complete (you need to assemble it, but all the parts are there), was affordable, had quality software and had a good support structure.

    There are three variation of the Shapeoko 3, I went with the XXL because the other sizes were too small for cutting any larger sized bodies and if I was going to spend any decent money, I didn't want any roadblocks early on. I forget the retail price on the XXL, I think it's around $2000 but then I had to add on the router, a bunch of carbide bits and some assorted odds and ends, plus building the bench for it. So I think I ended up around $3000 all in for the machine assembled, mounted on the table with the basic bits I needed.

    I have probably 200+ guitar bodies etc. from all those years in AutoCAD, and luckily Fusion 360 is the preferred modeling software for 3D and CAM work (and the startup license is free), so I could import my DXF files directly into it, use similar 'push-pull' tools like I was using in Sketch-up and make something resembling a guitar body in pretty short order.

    It's been said a million times but bears repeating. There's a lot the CNC does but a lot it DOESN'T do. For me, I basically use is for the templating process (saves me the $18 a piece print from Kinkos, and ~5-6 sheets of hardboard for several templates needed for one guitar) and for the precision spec'd cavities (electronics, neck pockets, etc.; saves me ~$20 a piece on plexi templates). I only recently started using it for carving neck profiles but I think that's as far as I'd go.

    A lot of guys I've seen try and fail at using the CNC use it for tummy cuts and arm contours, etc. Which is fine, some do it successfully and that's the way they do it in bigger factories but from experience, those are the things that take an outsized amount of time in the programming process, take an outsized amount of time in the machining process and are most likely to go wrong. I've seen a lot of guys get into building backward where they'll get the CNC machine, expect it to do all the work and when it spits out the body with tool marks that need to be sanded out of inconvenient places or with flaws that need to be fixed with actual wood working tools (like blowouts that need to be fixed with a chisel and a dovetail saw for the replacement), and they're not equipped to do any of that, so the guitar sits unfinished, they get burned out and the machine collects dust.

    So yeah, even as a hobbyist, it's good to learn what the machine does well and what the hand does well. But as far as the CNC goes overall, I definitely encourage anybody interested to give it a try now that it's more accessible. For me, it's honestly saved me a lot of money and time, and it works as a second pair of hands in the shop.

  9. #23


    Join Date: Apr 2009
    Location: MA/NH Border
    ME: Epi G400 LP Custom
    MB: EDB600/605

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    Inb4 Randy becomes the next fly by night (or should I say, Nitefly?) luthier

  10. #24


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Kitchen/Laundry Room
    ME: Ironing Board
    MA: Laundry Mangle
    MB: Cascade Dish Detergent
    Rig: Washing Machine

    iTrader: 2 (100%)

    Wait for a big announcement the day after Thanksgiving...

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