NGD: Parker-ish Build (Bumblefoot content) - Page 5
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Thread: NGD: Parker-ish Build (Bumblefoot content)

  1. #33


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Somerville, Ma
    ME: Suhr Modern 7
    MA: Martin MC16-GTE
    MB: Squier 5 string P-bass
    Rig: Mark V

    iTrader: 5 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Randy View Post
    Wait for a big announcement the day after Thanksgiving...
    Has anyone heard from Randy?
    "They can kill you, but the legalities of eating you are a bit dicier." - David Foster Wallace

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  3. #34


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Kitchen/Laundry Room
    ME: Ironing Board
    MA: Laundry Mangle
    MB: Cascade Dish Detergent
    Rig: Washing Machine

    iTrader: 2 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken View Post
    It's all been said, but I'll toss in another "Wow, that is fucking awesome" because, well, it is.
    Thanks, that's very generous of you.

    Quote Originally Posted by robanomoly View Post
    Incredible work! Thank you for sharing.

    Your comments on guitar building and CNC match my own. There are times when I think a CNC would be handy, but not often enough to justify the money and space.
    Much appreciated, I take that on very good authority.

    Utility definitely depends a lot on the person, their style, their workflow, etc. Someone who does small semi-production type business (I'm envisioning someone making Adirondack chairs, for example) where they do a lot of repetitive cuts would definitely benefit.

    It works pretty good for making guitars but cutting out a solid body guitar out of hardwood 1 3/4" thick, confined to 1/4" shank bits and ~3" max Z axis translates a lot of wear and tear on the machine and a lot of maintenance. I mean, it does it well but it's the kinda thing you probably wouldn't want to do more than 2 or 3 copies at a time (so like, 2 or 3 bodies, or 2 or 3 necks) before you need to clean the machine up, recheck the belt tensions, maybe change or clean the bit, etc. And after you do that, you need to recalibrate the machine, which means the next set of cuts become semi-experimental again.

    In that sense, something this size (the X-Carve is nearly identical, so this applies there too) is especially good for templating, prototyping and even some 'start to finish' work but ideally something with low numbers. As I referenced in the earlier post, there's learning what it does and doesn't do and working around it to limit wear and tear, which cuts down on time you spend fixing "whoopsies!" or disassembling and reassembling the machine.

    EDIT: One thing I've done religiously after my first few tests, I only cut the guitar body down to about ~1.25" at the absolute most, then finish removing the stock with the bandsaw, then use the template router on it to match the contour the CNC cut. Not making those bits dig and cut that deep has helped a lot. I also make shallow shallow passes, usually no more than .125" at a time.
    Argbadh - RHLC©

  4. #35


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Kitchen/Laundry Room
    ME: Ironing Board
    MA: Laundry Mangle
    MB: Cascade Dish Detergent
    Rig: Washing Machine

    iTrader: 2 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Drew View Post
    Has anyone heard from Randy?
    Randarren Rico-Sherman confirmed.

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  6. #36


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Woodbridge, VA
    ME: KxK ProtoVii-7
    MA: Martin D-28
    Rig: Mesa/Boobies Stiletto

    iTrader: 2 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Drew View Post
    Has anyone heard from Randy?

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