Interesting take on US Made Guitars - Page 2
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Thread: Interesting take on US Made Guitars

  1. #9


    Join Date: Nov 2011
    Location: Portugal

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    Quote Originally Posted by budda View Post
    Cams post explains why the player series is awesome
    yes they are and I had so sell mine last year

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  3. #10


    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: Herndon, VA
    ME: Jackson Soloist
    Rig: Fractal Audio Axe-FX II

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    The prestige of US-made guitars is largely an artifact, now, but there are still small differences--mostly due to the market positioning. US made guitars get the best of everything and more attention. The difference isn't what it used to be, though.

    Prior to the late 1980s, the highest level of guitar luthiery existed almost solely in the USA. For production-quality guitars, the Japanese started to catch up in the late '70s and probably achieved parity in the '90s. The Koreans got close in the late '00s to mid '10s, though they've now been undercut by the Indonesians.

    A lot of the other stuff this guy talks about is supply chain and marketing stuff. Sizable US manufacturers can't use US-made hardware because there isn't enough of it to go around, and it's been a long time since guitar companies made their own metalware.

    In contrast, the lower manufacturing cost of Korean and Indonesian guitars has allowed the companies to improve the quality of the hardware on their guitars. Only the ultra-cheapies have off-brand bridges or pickups anymore.

    When I play a US-made Jackson, it's still noticeably different than even one of my Japanese-made ones that I adore. The fretwork is a little different. It's weightier, more solid, tighter on low-end chunk. Those are things that are tough to measure and which a less experienced player might not appreciate. Is that worth an additional $2,000+? It might be.

  4. #11


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Woodbridge, VA
    ME: CS USA Soloist 7
    MA: Ovation Elite Standard
    Rig: Mesa Triple Rec

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    Quote Originally Posted by jacksonplayer View Post
    When I play a US-made Jackson, it's still noticeably different than even one of my Japanese-made ones that I adore. The fretwork is a little different. It's weightier, more solid, tighter on low-end chunk. Those are things that are tough to measure and which a less experienced player might not appreciate. Is that worth an additional $2,000+? It might be.
    The difference definitely isn't as big as it used to be. The price gap is so much larger, though, that I feel like it can't possibly be worth it - but, since I already own a pile of good US-made guitars, I have a built-in bias.

    I still feel like the age of the wood has a lot to do with it, too - those '90s Japanese Jackson that were just meh sounding are getting much better with age in my experience. The age of the wood and not the craftsmanship had more to do with the mystique of the '59 Les Pauls that led to all this crap, anyway.

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  6. #12


    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: Herndon, VA
    ME: Jackson Soloist
    Rig: Fractal Audio Axe-FX II

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike View Post

    The difference definitely isn't as big as it used to be. The price gap is so much larger, though, that I feel like it can't possibly be worth it - but, since I already own a pile of good US-made guitars, I have a built-in bias.
    Same here. And it's more noticeable in recordings than in the audience.

    I just experienced the difference in the song I'm working on. The rhythm parts were messy with Soloist Jr. regardless of which pickup I installed or amp settings I used (unless I went down to useless 1978 Judas Priest levels). The 85 Soloist with the same pickup tightened that shit right up with no changes to amp settings, and all of a sudden the entire mix became clear and beautiful.

    Junior is a high quality guitar, but that USA custom from the golden age is what brought it all home.

  7. #13


    Join Date: Feb 2015
    Location: NY, USA
    ME: Kramer Baretta
    MA: PRS Angelus Alex Lifeson

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    I have several guitars, from decades ago, that are made in the U.S or Japan. Not one of them has ever had fret sprout. I routinely help friends out with their Mexican strats, Indonesian guitars, etc., that develop fret sprout. It might not be so much about the craftsmanship, but the pre-treatment of the materials.

  8. #14


    Join Date: Jun 2011
    Location: North Carolina
    ME: EBMM JP 13
    MA: Yamaha Classical Guitar
    Rig: Mark V w/ 2x12 V-30 Cab

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    I've never wanted to buy a Mexican or U.S.A. Fender in our current era. None of them ever appealed to me, except for the V-Neck Fender American Deluxe USA.
    That one was awesome, others were just bleh. So I'm not surprised. The only Fender's I ever liked were the Custom Shops and the Old ones (90's and before).

    As far as Charvel goes, in 2009 and 2010, they had those awesome U.S.A. Charvel So-Cal's & San Dimas's, they were sick and definitely worth the price tag of $1100.
    They were perfect. These new Charvels from Japan and the U.S.A are crap compared to those. I don't know what changed, but in know way shape or form would I pay $2000 for their current U.S.A. Guitars with the exception of the signature models. That Jake E. Lee Charvel is perfect.

    The only guitars that seem to be consistent with their highest quality guitars are Ibanez (Japan, U.S.) and Ernie Ball Music Man (U.S.A.).
    And I guess Gibson when they make ONE worth playing.

    Those Japanese Soloist's (I've played Several) from the early 90's were sick. I've never played a U.S.A. Jackson I liked, which I find very frustrating because I know how good they could be.
    If anyone has any prayer requests, need to talk, or have questions about the Gospel of Jesus Christ.
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  9. #15


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Woodbridge, VA
    ME: CS USA Soloist 7
    MA: Ovation Elite Standard
    Rig: Mesa Triple Rec

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    Quote Originally Posted by lespauled View Post
    I have several guitars, from decades ago, that are made in the U.S or Japan. Not one of them has ever had fret sprout. I routinely help friends out with their Mexican strats, Indonesian guitars, etc., that develop fret sprout. It might not be so much about the craftsmanship, but the pre-treatment of the materials.
    I suspect that plays a much bigger role than craftsmanship. The wood doesn't dry long enough, and the frets sprout as it dries out.

  10. #16


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Woodbridge, VA
    ME: CS USA Soloist 7
    MA: Ovation Elite Standard
    Rig: Mesa Triple Rec

    iTrader: 10 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by jacksonplayer View Post
    Same here. And it's more noticeable in recordings than in the audience.

    I just experienced the difference in the song I'm working on. The rhythm parts were messy with Soloist Jr. regardless of which pickup I installed or amp settings I used (unless I went down to useless 1978 Judas Priest levels). The 85 Soloist with the same pickup tightened that shit right up with no changes to amp settings, and all of a sudden the entire mix became clear and beautiful.

    Junior is a high quality guitar, but that USA custom from the golden age is what brought it all home.
    Scale length.

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