Ibanez Falchion build: The Scimitar - Page 2
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Thread: Ibanez Falchion build: The Scimitar

  1. #9


    Join Date: Nov 2013
    Location: Akhet-Aten
    ME: Jackson CS KE2
    MB: LTD Surveyor
    Rig: Diezel Einstein

    iTrader: 2 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Randy View Post
    Neck looks a hair thinner than the pocket but I think the bigger issue is it's just not pushed back in the pocket as far as it should be. I do some replacement bodies, and I always encourage filling the neck screw holes, clamping the neck into the new body and redrilling for the right fit.

    As far as the centerline, it's a matter of what you're trying to square with what. The neck, pickups and bridge are ideally square with eachother but they can kinda float anywhere with regard to their angle in relation to the body. You have to start with one fundamentally 'square' item and tweak everything else to match it. Considering the poor fit on the neck pocket, I'd assume that's where your angle issues begin and end.

    My recommendation is fill the neck screw holes, get two straight edges to run along side the neck while you clamp it in place and use those to center it with the stock bridge mounting holes (which are likely square-ish). Once you're happy, drill one or two pilot holes through the body mounting holes into the neck tenon. Chase in two screws so it holds, take the clamp off and do the other two holes. After your holes are predrilled, keep the screws semi loose, resquare with the straight edges, and cinch the neck down tight like it would if you were playing it and let it settle

    After that, you should be able to do all your bridge placement work relative to the holes and the bridge pickup route, since you know they're all squared with the neck now. Trying to drill for and mount a bridge based on a wonky neck pocket is asking for trouble, especially since the neck will wiggle once it's strung up and played/moved.
    Thanks for the great advice, Randy! Just filled the mounting holes with dowel rod and epoxy, so following up when that's dried out. Time to level some frets on an RG in the meantime!
    call me on 911 (USA) or 999 (UK) for poser disposal services

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  3. #10


    Join Date: Nov 2013
    Location: Akhet-Aten
    ME: Jackson CS KE2
    MB: LTD Surveyor
    Rig: Diezel Einstein

    iTrader: 2 (100%)

    Update!

    Last week I plugged and redrilled the neck mounting holes to realign with the centre and it was tricky, but worked a charm.
    Here's the test fit:


    Today was a long day of drilling and routing, but finally I've got a pretty clean looking Evertune cavity:




    Did a test fit and all was fine, except for it appears that I did the main spring cavity the wrong way around
    It's fine though, since I can shave the other side down tomorrow and luckily it won't affect aesthetics as it's all under the cover plate.

  4. #11


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Kitchen/Laundry Room
    ME: Ironing Board
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    Looks killer, good work.
    Argbadh - RHLC©

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  6. #12


    Join Date: Nov 2013
    Location: Akhet-Aten
    ME: Jackson CS KE2
    MB: LTD Surveyor
    Rig: Diezel Einstein

    iTrader: 2 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Randy View Post
    Looks killer, good work.
    Cheers Randy!

    Drill holes and sanding (320 grit) are now done, so did 3 coats of primer today:


    It's okay so far, but there are a few things that will need work before continuing.

    One thing is there were some points that weren't as smooth as I thought, which will need more sanding. I guess I'll reapply the primer over the areas that need work. There were also a few wood fibres sticking out, which I managed to mostly remove with some masking tape:


    There were also a few dents that I didn't fill as effectively as I thought, so I'll go over them with some automotive body filler (Bondo to the Americans), which I've just ordered.


    These little steps are going to slow the process down by a few weeks, so thank goodness for lockdown

  7. #13


    Join Date: Sep 2008
    Location: Kitchen/Laundry Room
    ME: Ironing Board
    MA: Laundry Mangle
    MB: Cascade Dish Detergent
    Rig: Washing Machine

    iTrader: 2 (100%)

    Progress

    The first coat of the finish tends to do that because the finish soaking in causes the wood fibers to stand up. A lot of guys use a sanding/vinyl sealer, then sand with ~320 to knock those down and the sealer sinks in enough to keep the endgrain from popping up again. Sometimes your first coat of finish (ie: primer) sinks in enough that hopefully the grain doesn't sprout up again in the next coat.

    Another good thing for the little divots is 'glazing putty'. It's the 'fine' last coat that goes after bondo in pinholes etc. and it's pretty much the same stuff but finer texture and it applies in a single stage (no hardener). Sometimes that's a good option depending on how big the dents are you're working with. Dries fast.

  8. #14


    Join Date: Nov 2013
    Location: Akhet-Aten
    ME: Jackson CS KE2
    MB: LTD Surveyor
    Rig: Diezel Einstein

    iTrader: 2 (100%)

    Quote Originally Posted by Randy View Post
    Progress

    The first coat of the finish tends to do that because the finish soaking in causes the wood fibers to stand up. A lot of guys use a sanding/vinyl sealer, then sand with ~320 to knock those down and the sealer sinks in enough to keep the endgrain from popping up again. Sometimes your first coat of finish (ie: primer) sinks in enough that hopefully the grain doesn't sprout up again in the next coat.

    Another good thing for the little divots is 'glazing putty'. It's the 'fine' last coat that goes after bondo in pinholes etc. and it's pretty much the same stuff but finer texture and it applies in a single stage (no hardener). Sometimes that's a good option depending on how big the dents are you're working with. Dries fast.
    Cheers Randy! Will bear in mind for the future.

    The 'bondo' (Isopon P38) arrived today, so I got straight to the filling bit. Got rid of the bulk of the dents, but maybe made up a bit too much- also it's harder to control than I anticipated.
    Here's what I got after 4.5~ hours drying:

    Sanded it down:

    Turned out it hadn't quite gone down enough, as the filler is now slightly proud in some spots (This is after going over with primer again)


    What I'll do now is leave it to dry and re-inspect tomorrow with a fresh view. The good thing, though, is that the primer layer is getting smoother and closer to being opaque.

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