Christmas beer haul - Page 2
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Thread: Christmas beer haul

  1. #9


    Join Date: Oct 2013
    Location: Brit in Munich, Germany
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    Sure! I like to stock up.



    Only when I got in did I realise I'd forgotten to get a crate of Bayreuther Aktien Zwickl. D'oh. Had to wait a week for that.
    The loose bottles on top are red wines, Schneider Weiße Aventinus Eisbock and a new Munich IPA I'd not seen before, from Haderner Bräu, apparently the first bio/organic brewery in the city. That was OK with a curry, IPAs aren't my thing.

    To get seasonal, here were my pressies:



    And here's a recent small haul:



    As for your selection, how was the Spaten? I've not had their Oktoberfest edition. They call the regular one "Spalter" (splitter), 'cause people reckon that's what happens to your head the morning after... I've never had enough of it in one go to experience that. Last time I had their regular Helles was at a Steel Panther show, it didn't work for me at all.

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  3. #10


    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: Glasgow - Scotland
    ME: Suhr M5
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    Rig: Mesa Mk V + Axe FX II

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dominic View Post
    Sure! I like to stock up.



    Only when I got in did I realise I'd forgotten to get a crate of Bayreuther Aktien Zwickl. D'oh. Had to wait a week for that.
    The loose bottles on top are red wines, Schneider Weiße Aventinus Eisbock and a new Munich IPA I'd not seen before, from Haderner Bräu, apparently the first bio/organic brewery in the city. That was OK with a curry, IPAs aren't my thing.

    To get seasonal, here were my pressies:



    And here's a recent small haul:



    As for your selection, how was the Spaten? I've not had their Oktoberfest edition. They call the regular one "Spalter" (splitter), 'cause people reckon that's what happens to your head the morning after... I've never had enough of it in one go to experience that. Last time I had their regular Helles was at a Steel Panther show, it didn't work for me at all. [IMG class=inlineimg]https://www.metalguitarist.org/forum/images/smilies/monocle.gif[/IMG]
    It was fine, if I'm honest most German beers I find fairly similar. I know that's kind of the idea but my favourites are Schneider tap 6 and weistephan dunkel as they are the most flavorsome to me.

    In other news Im just back from the thousand list civilizations Brussels festival. Me and a few friends went on a private tour of lindemans whilst out there and it was great, aude geuze is pretty refreshing when cold and their 'faro' is the sweetest and most desert wine like beer I've had. Obviously they have the fruit lambics as well. Pretty interesting brew process when compared to how other beers are made.

  4. #11


    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: Tokyo
    ME: Ibanez RGIXL7-ABL
    MB: Ibanez SR505
    Rig: Fractal Audio AX8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick View Post
    It was fine, if I'm honest most German beers I find fairly similar. I know that's kind of the idea but my favourites are Schneider tap 6 and weistephan dunkel as they are the most flavorsome to me.

    In other news Im just back from the thousand list civilizations Brussels festival. Me and a few friends went on a private tour of lindemans whilst out there and it was great, aude geuze is pretty refreshing when cold and their 'faro' is the sweetest and most desert wine like beer I've had. Obviously they have the fruit lambics as well. Pretty interesting brew process when compared to how other beers are made.
    Oh yeah. Lambics are my favorite style of beer, and it's the bacteria (such as lactobacillus and pediococcus) and wild yeast (mainly Brettanomyces) from the air that makes all the complex, delicious flavors. And time just makes them so much nicer. A well-made gueuze is a thing of beauty.

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  6. #12


    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: Glasgow - Scotland
    ME: Suhr M5
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    Rig: Mesa Mk V + Axe FX II

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    Quote Originally Posted by Naren View Post
    Oh yeah. Lambics are my favorite style of beer, and it's the bacteria (such as lactobacillus and pediococcus) and wild yeast (mainly Brettanomyces) from the air that makes all the complex, delicious flavors. And time just makes them so much nicer. A well-made gueuze is a thing of beauty.
    Yeah the yeasts you mentioned are what the guy was talking about. Although we did ask if aging them would be beneficial like barrel aged beer and he said after about 5 years it makes no difference and in his opinion after 3 it starts to work negatively. He was quite keen on 3 year blends though. He let us taste a 1 year which most people dont drink but some still do and it was fucking horrid.

    On this years vacation im headed to Colorado and I've got a full day private tour round denver planned. Not finalised the stops yet but so far it looks like Odel, Oskar Blues (taproom), TrVe Brew , Diebolt, Crooked Stave and maybe Great Divide.

    I am looking forward to it

  7. #13


    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: Tokyo
    ME: Ibanez RGIXL7-ABL
    MB: Ibanez SR505
    Rig: Fractal Audio AX8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick View Post
    Yeah the yeasts you mentioned are what the guy was talking about. Although we did ask if aging them would be beneficial like barrel aged beer and he said after about 5 years it makes no difference and in his opinion after 3 it starts to work negatively. He was quite keen on 3 year blends though. He let us taste a 1 year which most people dont drink but some still do and it was fucking horrid.

    On this years vacation im headed to Colorado and I've got a full day private tour round denver planned. Not finalised the stops yet but so far it looks like Odel, Oskar Blues (taproom), TrVe Brew , Diebolt, Crooked Stave and maybe Great Divide.

    I am looking forward to it
    So, with standard brewing yeast (Saccharomyces), which is what virtually all beer is made from, the yeast has finished all its work and is dormant after anywhere from one week to a month, but wild yeast and bacteria work very slowly (and most of the alcohol in sour and wild ales is still produced by standard brewing yeast). In particular, they can eat the complex sugars that normal brewing yeast can't eat, but they do so at a pace that takes months and sometimes up to a year. And after a year, they're still active and keep working on the beer. With lambics, that means that generally the older a beer is, the more sour it is because the lactic acid and acetic acid-producing bacteria keep producing more acid. And yeah, I think most would agree that they typically reach their limit at around 5 years. Whether it's negative beyond 3 years or not is a matter of opinion, but they do get pretty intense after that point. That's one reason why gueuzes are a blend of 3 year old lambics (and older) with "young lambics" (which are oftentimes about 1 year old), as well as some in between.

    Colorado has a lot of great breweries. Crooked Stave, in particular, is one of my faves. New Belgium is a pretty big brewery now, but they make a lot of exceptional sours and wild ales too (such as La Folie, Le Terroir, and Transatlantic Kriek which they made with Oud Beersel).

    Anyway, sounds like a pretty awesome vacation.

  8. #14


    Join Date: Oct 2013
    Location: Brit in Munich, Germany
    ME: Ibanez RG 550
    MB: Sandberg Ken Taylor 5
    Rig: Diezel Herbert

    iTrader: 0

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick View Post
    It was fine, if I'm honest most German beers I find fairly similar. I know that's kind of the idea but my favourites are Schneider tap 6 and weistephan dunkel as they are the most flavorsome to me.
    Yeah, with the strict purity laws, there's not that much they can do to get variation. Aventinus and Weihenstephan's Dunkel are favourites of mine, too.

    I expect to be in the Netherlands again at some point this year and hope not to have the flu like last time – that really put paid to my search for interesting beers.

  9. #15


    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: King of Prussia, PA
    ME: PRS CE22
    MA: Richard Cogger Classical
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    Rig: Mesa Mark V/TA30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Naren View Post
    So, with standard brewing yeast (Saccharomyces), which is what virtually all beer is made from, the yeast has finished all its work and is dormant after anywhere from one week to a month, but wild yeast and bacteria work very slowly (and most of the alcohol in sour and wild ales is still produced by standard brewing yeast). In particular, they can eat the complex sugars that normal brewing yeast can't eat, but they do so at a pace that takes months and sometimes up to a year. And after a year, they're still active and keep working on the beer. With lambics, that means that generally the older a beer is, the more sour it is because the lactic acid and acetic acid-producing bacteria keep producing more acid. And yeah, I think most would agree that they typically reach their limit at around 5 years. Whether it's negative beyond 3 years or not is a matter of opinion, but they do get pretty intense after that point. That's one reason why gueuzes are a blend of 3 year old lambics (and older) with "young lambics" (which are oftentimes about 1 year old), as well as some in between.

    Colorado has a lot of great breweries. Crooked Stave, in particular, is one of my faves. New Belgium is a pretty big brewery now, but they make a lot of exceptional sours and wild ales too (such as La Folie, Le Terroir, and Transatlantic Kriek which they made with Oud Beersel).

    Anyway, sounds like a pretty awesome vacation.
    Often the more intense sours are meant to be bottle-aged for special occasions, by which they've had a chance to "balance" a little bit more. They'll still be quite acidic, but give less of the pucker up feeling.

    However when it goes too far in the "sour fermentation" process it essentially turns into beer vinegar. Which can be used for cooking, but that's about it.


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