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Thread: 1 month clean

  1. #9


    Join Date: Oct 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus View Post
    The amount of sugar is on the high-side there (looking at the nutrition information about 25 % of the product is sugar). Otherwise i'd say they're not too bad - certainly better than eating a candy bar. So if it is more like a treat and you eat one or two a day, i'd say they're a pretty good alternative, definitely when compared to eating one or two Mars bars a day.
    Stupid question; how do I calculate the % of sugar? I see that its 10 grams of sugar, to me that is a tiny amount, am I wrong?

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  3. #10


    Join Date: Oct 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by schreckmusic View Post
    Yikes, I have been eating chicken and/or turkey (mainly chicken) 2x a day. Is this considered to be excess?
    You're most likely ok. Probably most cases where excess protein causes problems there's a underlying condition which is aggravated by the high protein consumption causing the kidneys to have to work harder.

    Based on these articles it seems like that is the case, i.e. high protein may cause problems for people with pre-existing conditions but does not cause kidney problems in itself
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1262767/

    https://academic.oup.com/advances/ar.../3/260/4568653
    "How can less be more? It's impossible. More is more."
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  4. #11


    Join Date: Oct 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by schreckmusic View Post
    Stupid question; how do I calculate the % of sugar? I see that its 10 grams of sugar, to me that is a tiny amount, am I wrong?
    One serving (2 bars = 42 g) contains 10 g of sugar - so for every 42 g of granola bar you eat, you get 10 g of sugar. However, that's still less than half compared to a 47 g Snickers bar which contains 22 g sugar.

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  6. #12


    Join Date: Oct 2008
    Location: Tokyo
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    Virtually all carbohydrates are sugar (dietary fiber is an example of something classified as a carb that is not a sugar). It's mainly divided into simple sugars (like fruits and table sugar) and complex sugars (starches such as potatoes, rice, and wheat). So, on the information printed on things in the US, if it says "45 grams of carbohydrates" and breaks that down into "15 grams of sugars," the remaining 30 grams could be completely complex sugars (such as oats). Now, oats are much more healthy than table sugar, mainly because table sugar has zero nutrients and vitamins in it, while oats (and most starches, really) have lots of nutrients and vitamins. But oats and table sugar are both sugar, just different kinds. I notice a lot of people use "carbs" to mean "starches" and oftentimes more specifically just certain kinds of starches, but that's, of course, wrong. The way some brands label it is "Carbohydrates" and "Added sugar," so all of the sugars already naturally in the food are in "Carbohydrates" and they remove the amount from that that was added into "Added sugar." I personally find that to be pretty convenient, but I like it best when they give ALL the information possible (including, for example, if 4 grams of that 45 grams of carbs is dietary fiber).

    Eating foods that are high in sugar or high in fat is fine as long as you don't go overboard. You just need to do it in moderation.

  7. #13


    Join Date: Oct 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naren View Post
    Virtually all carbohydrates are sugar (dietary fiber is an example of something classified as a carb that is not a sugar). It's mainly divided into simple sugars (like fruits and table sugar) and complex sugars (starches such as potatoes, rice, and wheat).
    Yeah, starch is a polymer (polysaccharide) of glucose (a monosaccharide). Usually when you talk about sugars, you refer to monosaccharides (like glucose and fructose) and disaccharides (e.g. sucrose, which is a combination of glucose and fructose, or lactose, a combination of glucose and galactose). These give a very quick glucose response in the body. Starch chains are then significantly longer and take longer to be released, because the amylase enzymes take a while to break them down into glucose. This can also be quicker or slower depending on the structure of the starch and how it's been treated. There are even resistant starches that aren't broken down at all by the human digestive enzymes, and basically work as fiber. Generally however, a pure starch will be release quite quickly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Naren View Post
    Now, oats are much more healthy than table sugar, mainly because table sugar has zero nutrients and vitamins in it, while oats (and most starches, really) have lots of nutrients and vitamins. But oats and table sugar are both sugar, just different kinds
    Oat starch is composed of glucose, yes. About 50-60 % of oats is starch, the rest is fiber, protein and fat. Partly because of the structure of starch and partly because of the other components, the release of glucose into the blood is much, much lower in wholegrain oat than for pure glucose.

    One way to measure this is the so called glycaemic index, where pure glucose is the reference (i.e. 100). Oat porridge from steel cut or rolled oats has a GI around 50 which is considered low GI, which means it gives a sustained release of glucose during a long time, instead of giving a sharp peak quickly. White bread or potatoes can have a GI of over 70 which means they give a much quicker increase in blood glucose than oats (or other high fiber foods such as beans for example). The quick, sharp glucose peak that you get from eating high GI foods causes a high amount of insulin to be released in order to regulate the glucose level in the blood, which then causes the blood sugar levels to sink quickly. Like I wrote earlier, how the flour is ground also affects this, so there are wholegrain breads that have almost as high GI as white breads, while other wholegrain breads have much lower GI. Most likely if you have a very airy, soft and fluffy wholegrain bread it will have higher GI than a dense, coarse and hard wholegrain bread.

  8. #14


    Join Date: Oct 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Markus View Post
    Oat starch is composed of glucose, yes. About 50-60 % of oats is starch, the rest is fiber, protein and fat. Partly because of the structure of starch and partly because of the other components, the release of glucose into the blood is much, much lower in wholegrain oat than for pure glucose.

    One way to measure this is the so called glycaemic index, where pure glucose is the reference (i.e. 100). Oat porridge from steel cut or rolled oats has a GI around 50 which is considered low GI, which means it gives a sustained release of glucose during a long time, instead of giving a sharp peak quickly. White bread or potatoes can have a GI of over 70 which means they give a much quicker increase in blood glucose than oats (or other high fiber foods such as beans for example). The quick, sharp glucose peak that you get from eating high GI foods causes a high amount of insulin to be released in order to regulate the glucose level in the blood, which then causes the blood sugar levels to sink quickly. Like I wrote earlier, how the flour is ground also affects this, so there are wholegrain breads that have almost as high GI as white breads, while other wholegrain breads have much lower GI. Most likely if you have a very airy, soft and fluffy wholegrain bread it will have higher GI than a dense, coarse and hard wholegrain bread.
    Exactly. You are correct on all points.

    Glycemic indexes oftentimes don't match what a lot of people might expect too. One example would be Grape Nuts, which has been marketed throughout its entire history as extremely healthy and nutritious, but it actually has one of the highest glycemic indexes that I've ever seen: 75. And when I was a teenager, I ate it sometimes and it would always shoot my blood sugar through the roof almost instantaneously.

    As a diabetic, it's extremely difficult for me to take insulin for high-starch meals because they raise the blood sugar so slowly. For example, if I eat a meal of 85 grams of carbohydrates, I'll need 17 units of short-acting insulin. If that's a typical meal, I can inject that immediately and it'll keep my blood sugar level. However, if those 85 grams are high in starches (oats, rice, corn, etc.), then taking that insulin at once will guarantee a very low blood sugar soon and a high blood sugar later (as a result of me raising my very low blood sugar back up to normal, which boosts up my eventual blood sugar), so it's something that needs to be planned out.

    There are some basic guidelines you can follow that are simple, but when you get down to it, these kinds of things are rather complicated.

  9. #15


    Join Date: Oct 2016
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    We started eating really clean a little over a year ago, cut out just about everything that wasn't consumed by people prior to the industrial revolution (i.e. all the processed, GMO garbage), and collectively my wife son and I dropped about 120lbs so far. I was having major inflammation issues - all gone. I feel better than I have in 10 years. I was also battling "brain fog" that was increasing like crazy - I honestly thought my IQ was dropping like a rock and couldn't figure out why. Since we began eating clean, it's totally cleared up.

    My son was pudgy, out of breath and lethargic. Now, he's slim, as energetic as any other 10 year old and enjoying life more. My wife had the most miraculous changes, and is now in the best shape she's been in since High School.

    Our journey started with watching this: https://www.netflix.com/title/80238655 which then took us down a rabbit hole of months of research that blew my mind. The processed food we're sold in the west causes untold amounts of diseases, disorders and cancers. The drugs people in the west are increasingly prescribed to combat these things are only band-aids and don't actually treat the cause. The scary part: the processed food companies and drug manufacturers are all owned by the same people who are profiting by selling us food that makes us sick, then drugs that treat those food-induced symptoms but don't really get us healthy. It's insidious. And, worse, in order to keep you from learning the truth, they go to great lengths to spread all sorts of misinformation, up to and including changing the names of sugar on ingredient labels to keep us from knowing we're ingesting poison.

    Processed sugar is more addictive than cocaine. It also feeds cancer, has no business in the human body, serves no real purpose and makes up a high percentage of the ingredient list in nearly everything. From pickles, to salad dressing to chicken nuggets, hot dogs, "boxed meals" ala Noodle-Roni or Hamburger Helper sorts of things, the added sugars are off the charts. One estimate from a dietary research organization in Australia found that over 80% of the food in a western grocery store has unneeded, added sugar in multiple forms, to make the food more addictive so we will buy more.

    When I was a kid (yes that WAS a long time ago ) cancer was on "old-people" disease. I now have multiple friends who's school aged children have it. And, how do their doctor's handle it? By prescribing drugs that produce radical health-damaging side-effects with little to no hope of actually curing the problem. Take your sick animal to the vet and the first thing they ask is "what are you feeding them?" When was the last time your doctor asked you that?

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  10. #16


    Join Date: Oct 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iron1 View Post

    When I was a kid (yes that WAS a long time ago ) cancer was on "old-people" disease. I now have multiple friends who's school aged children have it. And, how do their doctor's handle it? By prescribing drugs that produce radical health-damaging side-effects with little to no hope of actually curing the problem. Take your sick animal to the vet and the first thing they ask is "what are you feeding them?" When was the last time your doctor asked you that?
    Changing your diet won't cure cancer, cancer medication in many cases can cure it, or if it can't it can often extend the patient's life. A family friend was diagnosed with breast cancer in her thirties and while the treatments never cured her, she at least lived to see her kids grow up (died at 60). Her mother died at 37 of the same type of cancer because they didn't have effective treatments at that time yet. There are horrible examples of people who have tried to combat cancer by just changing their diet - pretty much 100% of them died. A good diet, enough exercise, not smoking, low alcohol consumption and healthy body weight reduces the risk of cancer though. And I agtree that doctor's should definitely be asking parents what they are feeding their kids and if they are exercising if an obese child shows up at their office, because cardiovascular disease, cancer etc. are strongly correlated with obesity.

    However, in Finland at least the age corrected cancer rates haven't increased since the 1950's (when statistics started being gathered) and the mortality has been reduced dramatically. Basically only a few cancers are a death sentence anymore, e.g. pancreatic cancer and some stomach cancers. For most of the cancers that you get symptoms from before it's too late, succesful treatment is nowadays quite likely.


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