Fellow parents- kids diet
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Thread: Fellow parents- kids diet

  1. #1


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    Fellow parents- kids diet

    My wife and I are both eating healthy now. Its just a matter of getting my son off of chicken nuggets and gold fish. What are some healthy toddler friendly food / meals?

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  3. #2


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    My four year eats what we do. So if we eat healthy, so does he. He gets the occasional happy meal, but that's a treat, not the norm.

    I don't know that I was helpful...

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    Processed food = not good. Just eat the least transformed food.
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  6. #4


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    Quote Originally Posted by Überschall View Post
    My four year eats what we do. So if we eat healthy, so does he. He gets the occasional happy meal, but that's a treat, not the norm.

    I don't know that I was helpful... <img src="https://www.metalguitarist.org/forum/images/smilies/laugh.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Laugh" class="inlineimg" />
    My son is also 4 and a picky eater. Only healthy things he eats are carrots, raw bell peppers, and cucumbers in vinegar. I really want him to eat healthy food but he never likes our meals.

  7. #5


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    Quote Originally Posted by schreckmusic View Post
    My son is also 4 and a picky eater. Only healthy things he eats are carrots, raw bell peppers, and cucumbers in vinegar. I really want him to eat healthy food but he never likes our meals.
    I'm not a father but I had one choice as a kid and that was to eat what my parents ate. Whatever was made I had to eat at least a serving of no matter how much I hated it, and I always had to clear my plate if I took seconds of anything. When my picky eater friends came over they had to the choice to eat what we ate or not eat at all. Definitely no desert unless I finished my dinner. These days I'm a professional cook who likes to eat basically anything put in front of him. I definitely attribute my openness to trying new things and the fact I generally like new things to how I was raised.

    My sister was more naturally picky so they kind of had a reward system for her when she was younger for eating stuff she didn't like, but once she got to age of 5 or 6 it was the same rules for her as it was for me.

    That said, pan searing a chicken cutlet is going to be much healthier in the long run than eating chicken nuggets out of a freezer. Especially if you can say convince him to eat something like a chicken parm with spaghetti in redsauce or chicken milanese with a side of mashed potatos and carrots, rather than a full meal of chicken nuggets dipped in ketchup. Incorporating stuff he likes into a full meal is definitely important, i'd just be adamant about forcing him to broaden his horizons if he wants to get a second serving of what he likes. Health wise I'd definitely suggest scratch cooking to avoid unnescary preservatives, and spending a few extra dollars to get organic or preferably raw/cold pasteurized milk and juicing yourself. Things like fresh parsley, chives, citrus, basil, fresh garlic, are extremely good for him and shouldn't be hard to incorporate into a meal with relatively little effect in taste.

  8. #6


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    Good luck mate, it can be tough. I would definitely recommend making a transition with him to the "eat what we eat" method. I think you may have to find some fun ways to make the food exciting.

    https://www.wired.com/2011/08/12-sma...thy-foods-fun/

    Here are my favorite bits:
    Focus on companionship. When eating is about companionship, it builds positive associations between healthy food and togetherness. Relaxed conversation also de-emphasizes who eats how much of what. Kids who eat family meals regularly tend to have better dietary behavior as teens. And family discussions also boost brainpower.

    ...

    Eat like a monster. There’s nothing really wrong with pretzel-stick fences and broccoli trees sprouting from mashed-potato landscapes, as long as the kids themselves are the ones who create and then cheerfully devour the scenery.

    ...

    Make eating new, unusual, or typically kid-scorned foods a privilege. Rather than family policies such as “Try just three bites” or “Clean your plate,” avoid the pressure of overt encouragement. You might say, “Would you like to try it?” rather than automatically giving a serving. You might wait until your child asks for a bite of what the adults are eating. You might even imply that the dish is something the child is more likely to enjoy when older. That puts the emphasis on the pleasure found in unfamiliar foods. You can’t enforce taste.
    We also often struggle to get ours to eat protein. He could live on green vegetables, fruit and olives; it's hilarious. So we'll sometimes serve him a small amount of the protein first, and we tell him, "First chicken, then broccoli." Then we don't force the issue, just give him a few minutes to protest until he gets bored and just eats it anyway. It usually works reasonably well.

    But yeah we try to get excited about food and share that excitement with him. Sometimes he doesn't even want to eat spaghetti - kids are weird.

    I'd wager that if you find a few good strategies, you can make a noticeable improvement in a few months. It helps if he has friends that eat healthy too.

  9. #7


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    Quote Originally Posted by Soopahmahn View Post
    Good luck mate, it can be tough. I would definitely recommend making a transition with him to the "eat what we eat" method. I think you may have to find some fun ways to make the food exciting.

    https://www.wired.com/2011/08/12-sma...thy-foods-fun/

    Here are my favorite bits:


    We also often struggle to get ours to eat protein. He could live on green vegetables, fruit and olives; it's hilarious. So we'll sometimes serve him a small amount of the protein first, and we tell him, "First chicken, then broccoli." Then we don't force the issue, just give him a few minutes to protest until he gets bored and just eats it anyway. It usually works reasonably well.

    But yeah we try to get excited about food and share that excitement with him. Sometimes he doesn't even want to eat spaghetti - kids are weird.

    I'd wager that if you find a few good strategies, you can make a noticeable improvement in a few months. It helps if he has friends that eat healthy too.
    Great idea! I am guilty of making eating for him too serious. I will give it a go

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