Fredman SM57 miking technique; anyone still doing this? - Page 2
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Thread: Fredman SM57 miking technique; anyone still doing this?

  1. #9


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    Quote Originally Posted by Überschall View Post
    I go two mics into the daw (actually 3, since I also use a 122 on another speaker). Having the different 57 tracks available allows you to change the tone without having to use EQ. Of course, you could just get it right and sum it to a single track when you record, but I have commitment issues
    Get it right in a single track? For me not likely to happen
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  3. #10


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    Quote Originally Posted by jmeezle View Post
    Yeah no thanks on using two 57's.
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris View Post
    This. Two 57s is just needlessly overcomplicating things.
    Honestly, give it a try before you knock it.

    IMO, two of ANY mics on a cab give you a pretty major pickup in "girth" and three-dimensionality of the sound; I've always liked thhe SM57, but considered it a very filtered, finnicky mic to position (but when you get it right it owns in a mix). Adding a second SM57 took away a ton of that "filtered" sound and right off the bat made everything sound bigger and fuller.

    When you start experimenting with mic choice for a second mic you can do some pretty cool stuff - the MD421 owns because it's bright, deep, and scooped, and fits nicely around the SM57 tonally - but even just adding in another identical mic really does some pretty surprising things to rounding out the sound of a guitar. And, considering how cheap SM57s are, if you're working on a budget grabbing a second SM57 once you've got a handle on how to position the first is a no brainer, IMO.
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  4. #11


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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew View Post
    Honestly, give it a try before you knock it.

    IMO, two of ANY mics on a cab give you a pretty major pickup in "girth" and three-dimensionality of the sound; I've always liked thhe SM57, but considered it a very filtered, finnicky mic to position (but when you get it right it owns in a mix). Adding a second SM57 took away a ton of that "filtered" sound and right off the bat made everything sound bigger and fuller.

    When you start experimenting with mic choice for a second mic you can do some pretty cool stuff - the MD421 owns because it's bright, deep, and scooped, and fits nicely around the SM57 tonally - but even just adding in another identical mic really does some pretty surprising things to rounding out the sound of a guitar. And, considering how cheap SM57s are, if you're working on a budget grabbing a second SM57 once you've got a handle on how to position the first is a no brainer, IMO.
    Yes totally, back when I was a studio engineer I would use this technique a lot (no special mic clip though). When done right it really sounds much bigger than a single 57. Each part of the pair can sound thin or odd on it's own but together they really sound a lot fuller than a single 57.
    I used to use that as my default micing setup and then sometimes add a 421 or a neumann TLM (as long as they are all in phase of course). I found it worked well for a lot of things - not just rock/metal guitar.
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  6. #12


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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew View Post
    Honestly, give it a try before you knock it.

    IMO, two of ANY mics on a cab give you a pretty major pickup in "girth" and three-dimensionality of the sound; I've always liked thhe SM57, but considered it a very filtered, finnicky mic to position (but when you get it right it owns in a mix). Adding a second SM57 took away a ton of that "filtered" sound and right off the bat made everything sound bigger and fuller.

    When you start experimenting with mic choice for a second mic you can do some pretty cool stuff - the MD421 owns because it's bright, deep, and scooped, and fits nicely around the SM57 tonally - but even just adding in another identical mic really does some pretty surprising things to rounding out the sound of a guitar. And, considering how cheap SM57s are, if you're working on a budget grabbing a second SM57 once you've got a handle on how to position the first is a no brainer, IMO.
    I agree, having gotten my extra 57 yesterday. I don't have the clip yet, but trying it with two stands is really cool. Being able to mix after the fact, it's like EQ'ing at the source, instead of in the box. I won't be ditching my e609 or canceling plans of getting a Fathead, but it's a cool option.

    Plus, I'll be able to do the two SM57's on one cab, and the Fathead on another, to get the ribbon sound.

  7. #13


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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew View Post
    Honestly, give it a try before you knock it.

    IMO, two of ANY mics on a cab give you a pretty major pickup in "girth" and three-dimensionality of the sound; I've always liked thhe SM57, but considered it a very filtered, finnicky mic to position (but when you get it right it owns in a mix). Adding a second SM57 took away a ton of that "filtered" sound and right off the bat made everything sound bigger and fuller.

    When you start experimenting with mic choice for a second mic you can do some pretty cool stuff - the MD421 owns because it's bright, deep, and scooped, and fits nicely around the SM57 tonally - but even just adding in another identical mic really does some pretty surprising things to rounding out the sound of a guitar. And, considering how cheap SM57s are, if you're working on a budget grabbing a second SM57 once you've got a handle on how to position the first is a no brainer, IMO.
    I think that if you can't get a good metal tone with a 57 on a good sounding cab, something else is the problem. I'm not saying that adding a second mic is a bad idea, but time spent fucking around with that shit could be spent somewhere else.

    Amp > Cab > 57 > DAW is as simple as it gets and with recording being a fucking hilariously convoluted process as it is these days, it's nice to keep things simple where possible. Crank the amp, let it rip and EQ to taste later. If I'm a professional studio engineer then yeah, I'd want a bunch of mics and options. But for 99% of the world and basically everyone on this forum, a single 57 and even fair to midland mixing skill is all that's needed to get a great sound.

    Crooks loaned me his 421 a while back and while I did eventually get some good results with it, it was a lot of time spent for minimal and subjective at best benefit.

  8. #14


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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris View Post
    I think that if you can't get a good metal tone with a 57 on a good sounding cab, something else is the problem. I'm not saying that adding a second mic is a bad idea, but time spent fucking around with that shit could be spent somewhere else.

    Amp > Cab > 57 > DAW is as simple as it gets and with recording being a fucking hilariously convoluted process as it is these days, it's nice to keep things simple where possible. Crank the amp, let it rip and EQ to taste later. If I'm a professional studio engineer then yeah, I'd want a bunch of mics and options. But for 99% of the world and basically everyone on this forum, a single 57 and even fair to midland mixing skill is all that's needed to get a great sound.

    Crooks loaned me his 421 a while back and while I did eventually get some good results with it, it was a lot of time spent for minimal and subjective at best benefit.
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  9. #15


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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris View Post
    I think that if you can't get a good metal tone with a 57 on a good sounding cab, something else is the problem. I'm not saying that adding a second mic is a bad idea, but time spent fucking around with that shit could be spent somewhere else.

    Amp > Cab > 57 > DAW is as simple as it gets and with recording being a fucking hilariously convoluted process as it is these days, it's nice to keep things simple where possible. Crank the amp, let it rip and EQ to taste later. If I'm a professional studio engineer then yeah, I'd want a bunch of mics and options. But for 99% of the world and basically everyone on this forum, a single 57 and even fair to midland mixing skill is all that's needed to get a great sound.

    Crooks loaned me his 421 a while back and while I did eventually get some good results with it, it was a lot of time spent for minimal and subjective at best benefit.
    Well, if you can't get a pretty good tone out of a single SM57, you sure as shit aren't going to get a good sound out of two of them - I'd never tell someone who didn't at least have a pretty good handle on positioning a single mic to try using two, because they'll go insane. (EDIT - Rereading this, I'm not saying "Quigs sucks at recording" even though at a glance it sort of reads like that, so I'm adding this to clarify that I'm agreeing with you - unless you can get a good sound out of a single SM57, then you're wasting your time trying anything more complicated.)

    (pausing here to note that I also always go about this by positioning a "primary" SM57 and get that sounding pretty good on its own before I even reach for a second mic, which I look at as a supporting mic. So, yeah, if that first core mic isn't already pretty good on its own, absolutely nothing is going to save you).

    Adding a second supporting mic, be it a second SM57 either as a spaced pair or a Fredman pair, or something else like a MD421 or a R121 or whatever, can definitely make a SM57 sound "bigger" and "fuller" and give it more depth - it's not too unlike the difference between a single track and a doubled performance, I guess, though not as drastic. That's not always a good thing - if everything in a mix is big, nothing in the mix is big - and I'll usually mix one of the mics behind the other rather than set them both level... But you can get some seriously lush tones out of a SM57 and a second mic.

  10. #16


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    Quote Originally Posted by Drew View Post
    Well, if you can't get a pretty good tone out of a single SM57, you sure as shit aren't going to get a good sound out of two of them - I'd never tell someone who didn't at least have a pretty good handle on positioning a single mic to try using two, because they'll go insane. (EDIT - Rereading this, I'm not saying "Quigs sucks at recording" even though at a glance it sort of reads like that, so I'm adding this to clarify that I'm agreeing with you - unless you can get a good sound out of a single SM57, then you're wasting your time trying anything more complicated.)

    (pausing here to note that I also always go about this by positioning a "primary" SM57 and get that sounding pretty good on its own before I even reach for a second mic, which I look at as a supporting mic. So, yeah, if that first core mic isn't already pretty good on its own, absolutely nothing is going to save you).

    Adding a second supporting mic, be it a second SM57 either as a spaced pair or a Fredman pair, or something else like a MD421 or a R121 or whatever, can definitely make a SM57 sound "bigger" and "fuller" and give it more depth - it's not too unlike the difference between a single track and a doubled performance, I guess, though not as drastic. That's not always a good thing - if everything in a mix is big, nothing in the mix is big - and I'll usually mix one of the mics behind the other rather than set them both level... But you can get some seriously lush tones out of a SM57 and a second mic.
    Yeah, tossing two mics up on the grille when you didn't get the first one right is just a rabbit hole of failure.

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