Need advice on preamp and setting up mic signal chain - Page 2
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Thread: Need advice on preamp and setting up mic signal chain

  1. #9


    Join Date: Sep 2016
    Location: Canada
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    Unfortunately I haven't had the chance to try it yet, it's been a busy week and I'm leaving on vacation tomorrow so I won't get a chance for at least another two weeks.
    But I'm dieing to start recording my with my recto. Hopefully I'll get better results than I have with my HT-100 emulated output.

    Thanks again for all the tips everyone.

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  3. #10


    Join Date: Apr 2011
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    You're better off investing into a new interface rather than getting an external preamp. A higher grade interface will not only give you a ton of new features and options but also better preamps. External microphone preamplifiers are amazing and fun, but the return on investment compared to other studio equipment is very low for a home studio. You're better off spending the money on studio monitors, acoustic treatment, software, comfortable chair, etc, etc.

    The reason that a lot of people have upgraded to external preamps is due to low output from certain microphones like the Shure SM7B and not enough gain from the internal preamps. But ever company has noticed how common that microphone is and brought up the gain on modern interfaces. I personally recommend getting an interface from brands like RME and Universal Audio.

    If you decide to invest into external preamps, the MIDAS XL48 is a good investment since they come with a 10 year warranty and are priced very well.

    There is no major audio difference between an XLR cable and TRS cable. It's the same wiring with different connectors.

    Also I personally would not recommend getting a condenser microphone unless you have a decent budget. Cheaper condenser microphones tend to be very harsh, thin, and have crazy resonances. Usually easier to mix a dynamic than one of those.

  4. #11


    Join Date: Sep 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lopez View Post
    You're better off investing into a new interface rather than getting an external preamp. A higher grade interface will not only give you a ton of new features and options but also better preamps. External microphone preamplifiers are amazing and fun, but the return on investment compared to other studio equipment is very low for a home studio. You're better off spending the money on studio monitors, acoustic treatment, software, comfortable chair, etc, etc.

    The reason that a lot of people have upgraded to external preamps is due to low output from certain microphones like the Shure SM7B and not enough gain from the internal preamps. But ever company has noticed how common that microphone is and brought up the gain on modern interfaces. I personally recommend getting an interface from brands like RME and Universal Audio.

    If you decide to invest into external preamps, the MIDAS XL48 is a good investment since they come with a 10 year warranty and are priced very well.

    There is no major audio difference between an XLR cable and TRS cable. It's the same wiring with different connectors.

    Also I personally would not recommend getting a condenser microphone unless you have a decent budget. Cheaper condenser microphones tend to be very harsh, thin, and have crazy resonances. Usually easier to mix a dynamic than one of those.
    Thanks, I've been thinking about upgrading my interface for a while. I'd like to get something with at least two channels because eventually I'll get another mic so I can blend two together.
    And I've already treated my basement with bass traps in all the corners and some of the celing corners. I wanted to do that before I got into recording with mic's. I figured there was no point untill I have some acoustic treatment. It definetly helped with the acoustics of the room but I'd still like to do a bit more. I want to build a diffuser, or get some foam panels that'll help with some of the higher frequencies. But that'll be a future project.

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  6. #12


    Join Date: Apr 2011
    Location: Port St. Lucie, FL
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    Get a RME Babyface Pro. Just switched over to an RME UFX and I'm pretty much sold on the brand.

  7. #13


    Join Date: Sep 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lopez View Post
    Get a RME Babyface Pro. Just switched over to an RME UFX and I'm pretty much sold on the brand.
    Thanks, I'll take a look into that.

  8. #14


    Join Date: Sep 2016
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    I finally got a chance to try out the mic today. I would of done it sooner but the stand I ordered from Amazon was late and didn't show up till today.
    I was mostly just experimenting with mic placement and trying differnt speakers to see how the sound changes. Hopefully I'll get a chance to record some music with it later on this week.
    I may of had an unrealistic expectation of what it was going to sound like. I knew it wasn't going to sound the same as how the amp sounds in the room but I didn't expect it to sound so compressed, thin and fizzy. I'm not sure if this has to do with mic placement, amp settings, or whether it needs to be EQ'd after the mic. Probably all three. I'd post a clip of what it sounds like but I have no idea how to do that.
    Anyway, I can't do too much with amp settings for now. I'm part way through recording a song and I really don't want to touch any of the amp settings untill I've finished it.

  9. #15


    Join Date: Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madmardigan View Post
    I finally got a chance to try out the mic today. I would of done it sooner but the stand I ordered from Amazon was late and didn't show up till today.
    I was mostly just experimenting with mic placement and trying differnt speakers to see how the sound changes. Hopefully I'll get a chance to record some music with it later on this week.
    I may of had an unrealistic expectation of what it was going to sound like. I knew it wasn't going to sound the same as how the amp sounds in the room but I didn't expect it to sound so compressed, thin and fizzy. I'm not sure if this has to do with mic placement, amp settings, or whether it needs to be EQ'd after the mic. Probably all three. I'd post a clip of what it sounds like but I have no idea how to do that.
    Anyway, I can't do too much with amp settings for now. I'm part way through recording a song and I really don't want to touch any of the amp settings untill I've finished it.
    Probably all three, although double-tracking your parts will make them sound a lot more spacious.

    When you do get some time to experiment, I generally find myself placing the mic on axis, against the grill, and either right in line with the point where the dust cap meets the cone (a flashlight helps here) or within 1" of that point, outwards on the cone. And, if you haven't already done this, dialing in your amp either listening through the mic, or with your ear in line with the speaker, really helps too, especially if you're using a combo with the speakers down at or below knee level and nowhere close to your ears (even a 4x12 sounds different but you're at least closer to being in line).
    "They can kill you, but the legalities of eating you are a bit dicier." - David Foster Wallace

  10. #16


    Join Date: Apr 2017
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    If you haven't done a lot of micing amps then doing so is gonna be a bit of a throw. It will indeed sound nothing like the amp in the room. As a guy who has spent most of his guitar playing time through amp sims and impulses, it was a much smoother transition for me. Follow Drew's advice, that mic position is a great starting point for micing a high-gain amp. It still may not sound right, that's where experimentation comes into play.
    C'mon son.

    Hellevate

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