Bass Rider and Compression/EQ - which order? - Page 3
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Thread: Bass Rider and Compression/EQ - which order?

  1. #17


    Join Date: Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    Bass can be simple, but getting it right can be complex for sure! Chris, try this, run your B7K into a good tube mic pre. From there, have fun with the EQ until you get what you like, and then throw a compressor on either the track or the bus/folder, whichever way you use in your workflow. You know what's actually awesome? ReaComp. The simple compressor that comes with Reaper is actually badass for drums and bass. I dig the bass preset on it, and I get it to about -6dB or so of compression and everything just pops.

    Hey if I can get my cheap Ibanez SG to sound good like that, I'm sure you can do even better with a more premier bass!
    Right on man. I'm not at all unhappy with my bass tone though, it sounds awesome.

    I'm just curious about how folks are using Bass Rider, which somehow got misinterpreted as "recommend me a zillion plugins".

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  3. #18


    Join Date: Oct 2008
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    Like Crooks said multiple units doing small amounts of work will get you better results, pinning down the momentary aspects of low end in a mix is hard to achieve but will make everything sound way better. I know that you already know this, but tracking is absolutely key for bass, picking consistency, minimising string movement and striking the string in the same spot every stroke are going to massively reduce how much riding and compression you have to do at the other end. I have Bass Rider but haven't used it since I really started concentrating on that.

  4. #19


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    Quote Originally Posted by Lozek View Post
    Like Crooks said multiple units doing small amounts of work will get you better results, pinning down the momentary aspects of low end in a mix is hard to achieve but will make everything sound way better. I know that you already know this, but tracking is absolutely key for bass, picking consistency, minimising string movement and striking the string in the same spot every stroke are going to massively reduce how much riding and compression you have to do at the other end.
    Yeah, that's a huge part of it and something I always forget until I actually sit down to record it. As soon as I start actually getting into what I'm playing, my "bass form" (lack of a better word) goes to shit. So when I do takes that I plan to keep I have to try to be robotic about it, which generally means just doing lots of really short takes.

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  6. #20


    Join Date: Feb 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris View Post
    Right on man. I'm not at all unhappy with my bass tone though, it sounds awesome.

    I'm just curious about how folks are using Bass Rider, which somehow got misinterpreted as "recommend me a zillion plugins".
    I figured that was what you wanted. Are you not familiar with the ancient Chinese adage, "Man who asks internet question about Waves Plugin that is answered succinctly in first five pages of plugin's manual deserves shitty bass tone"?

    There's definitely a proper order of people to ask anytime you have a question about a VST or DAW. It's something like.

    1) Dead Relatives summoned through a seance
    2) A Magic Eight Ball
    3) A Priest
    4) Yelling at the Sky/To any Gods who might be listening
    5) A psychic
    6) A licensed therapist
    7) An unrelated enthusiasts' group devoted to something like model trains or orchids
    8) Askjeeves.com
    9) The man drinking at the bar besides you after you embarked on an epic grief bender after realizing that askjeeves.com is no more
    10) A call center employee who has a questionable grasp of the english language
    11) The call center employee's manager
    12) A stray coyote that made eye contact with you who probably has the soul of a human and understands what you are saying and probably knows how to know the plugin but who runs away just when you think you are getting somewhere but then comes back and bites you and gives you rabies
    13) The doctor giving you a rabies shot
    14) The nephew of the doctor who gave you a rabies shot, who is a "real whiz with computers, like those Geek Squad people"
    15) The clerk at the counter of the health food store, who recommends a homeopathic oil that can be found in aisle 3 that only grows in the obscure corners of the little known Asian section of the Alps that will cure your rabies and your plugin issues
    16) Fortune cookies
    17) The Youtube comments section
    18) A hindu guru you found through the youtube comments section
    19) The Infowars comment section
    20) A hallucination encountered during a drug fueled spirit quest
    21) A well reviewed self help book like THE SECRET
    22) The skull of a man named Yorrick
    23) A lucky coin toss
    24) An unsettling vintage carnival machine that is definitely carrying some kind of ancient curse
    25) An angry looking lady in a mental institution who rants at you about destroying the plugin because of the risk posed by sentient computer AIs and something called "Skynet"
    ....
    .....
    .....
    .....
    979) The crotchety administrator of the VST or DAWs official forum, who definitely doesn't get paid enough for this shit and really thought for a moment that all the stickies and FAQs would prevent something like this from happening anymore and restore their faith in humanity.
    980) The official product manual. Where your question is succinctly answered in the first five pages by a manufacturer so annoyed that people are so opposed to consulting VST manuals that they also have a series of 5 minute youtube videos that answer your question.
    981) A Mesa Boogie manual. Just to be extra safe about absorbing as much knowledge as possible.

  7. #21


    Join Date: Sep 2008
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    I’m just going to use zombo.com from now on.

  8. #22


    Join Date: Feb 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris View Post
    I’m just going to use zombo.com from now on.
    You should subscribe to Sound on Sound, there is no perfect "authority" but they are as good as it gets. It's like $50 for a year to get access to all their articles.

    Their glossary of technical terms alone is worth reading because it will have at least 3-4 things where you are like, "Wow, I was wrong about that for years".

    https://www.soundonsound.com/sound-a...echnical-terms

    There are probably like, two people on most music centric sites who actually know what "dithering" is. I thought it was a sort of golf stroke, like a particularly aggressive putt.

    It won't make you a master in a week, but it's still a significantly better option than the audio equivalent of asking the local occupants of the kiddie pool what kind of training you should do to win the 50 meter freestyle in the olympics.

    I regret not subscribing to it for years. There are a lot of, "Yeah, I probably shouldn't have asked that person to explain compression to me......in retrospect that was an incredibly obvious mistake" moments reading it.

  9. #23


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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg McCoy View Post
    Is that your advice for people who are DIY'ing all the parts themselves or your advice as a Mastering guy for how you want tracks delivered if the person has no real clue what they are doing? Same for both? I assume most people are really concerned about "polishing" the bass track to the point of parody and then delivering it to the mastering guy and having them be like, "uh, do you have an earlier version without all this stuff printed?".

    Does that also apply if you are paying to have someone else master it out of curiosity? Isn't there a real risk of printing all the tracks like that, and then it turns out you took a little off too many times? Especially with a pair of consumer monitors that can't produce frequencies low enough to get an accurate picture?

    Don't you also have dedicated subs? Is that advisable? Especially for a bass tuned lower than EADG. It seems like if you are paying someone else to master it and you don't have subs you might do too much and run the chance of delivering something that is so "polished" it's already locked in a suboptimal state, is that a risk?

    I don't know if Chris is having someone else master his stuff or not, although I would assume most people concerned about having their bass sound good might be in that camp, just curious since you are a mastering guy.
    It's advice for the bass guitar track, yes. In modern metal you want the bass to be closer to a steady state tone than a wildly dynamic tone. Taking little bits down at a time keeps the volume fairly steady without it sounding lifeless.

    As for mastering, I don't and won't master anything I mix.

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