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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So... I just noticed when recording he tunes his Floyd Rose (which he shouldn't do after every take if set up properly anyway) with the spring screws on the back :scratch:

His reason being "all strings are a little flat so it's easier to just adjust the springs"... :ugh:

Well, he's kinda right. But doesn't this mess with the over-all setup?! I mean there is no reason why his $3500 ESP should go out of tune that often. My Warmoth build with with OFR holds tune for quite a few takes, but I'm aware that I have to replace that stupid OFR some day (it shouldn't be worn after 2-3 years, but it is!)

So does anybody else do this? Is this a really a "good" way of tuning a floyd? :spock:
 

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Yes. During setup. What your friend is doing makes logical sense.
 

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That is an odd way of doing things, but if all the strings are going flat by the same amount, I guess that's a logical way of dealing with it.

It won't 'mess with the setup'. Floating trems are just pivots, held in place by two equal and opposite forces: string vs spring tension. There's nothing magical about the springs.

But if I were him, and that was happening even after the strings have been nicely stretched, and it was always adjusting the springs in the same direction, I'd be looking at replacing them. After all, there's not infinite travel on the spring claw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
That is an odd way of doing things, but if all the strings are going flat by the same amount, I guess that's a logical way of dealing with it.

It won't 'mess with the setup'. Floating trems are just pivots, held in place by two equal and opposite forces: string vs spring tension. There's nothing magical about the springs.

But if I were him, and that was happening even after the strings have been nicely stretched, and it was always adjusting the springs in the same direction, I'd be looking at replacing them. After all, there's not infinite travel on the spring claw.
The problem is that when he screws with the springes the Floyd doesn't get flat with the surface of the guitar when he's in tune. I saw that when checking his guitar and it was leaning a bit back or fourth or something. I'm really anal about having my flat as 100% flat with the surface as possible. I check it almost every day in case something with the temperature has made any changes with the neck/body. Usually it's flat as can be, but I'm always ready to fix it :flex:

Yeah I think he should just get new springs, ahha

A couple of years ago when I started knowing the guy, I remember that guitar having 100% flat Floyd and he didn't do much except an occasional fine tuner turn. It's a super expensive Alexi Laiho signature (like $3500) and it's like the best guitar I've ever had in my hands.
So yeah, the springs should be going bad by now if he's tuning this much... Or he should just get the bridge to sit 100% flat and then dont screw with the screws :agreed:

Yes. During setup. What your friend is doing makes logical sense.
No? He's not setting it up, he does that all the time to "tune" the guitar...

I have maybe touched the screw springs on my Warmoth like 10 times max during the last two years and he did the same amount during one recording session even tho I said "hey, just use the fine tuners" but he was like "no all strings are a little sharp so I will tune with the springs instead" :scratch:
 

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I had a similar issue with my Dellinger and my old RG550. Both had worn springs and the Dellinger had posts that had deep grooves in them. Those two factors meant the bridge wasn't returning to zero every time being just a few cents out whenever I bent a note or used the bar. Some new springs and studs later and all was well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I had a similar issue with my Dellinger and my old RG550. Both had worn springs and the Dellinger had posts that had deep grooves in them. Those two factors meant the bridge wasn't returning to zero every time being just a few cents out whenever I bent a note or used the bar. Some new springs and studs later and all was well.
Is it even possible to wear out a stud without ruining the knife edge, and vice versa?

I would for example NEVER replace a FRT-2000 or FR Special with an OFR or Gotoh Floyd without changing the studs into something better, but it seems like some people actually do that and it just makes me worry about their new Floyds...
 

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Yeah, studs are usually the thing that goes first. They're made of brass usually so are softer than the hardened steel of the knife edges. The Ibanez Edge studs are awesome though due to the shape of them so I don't find they really wear out.
 

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This is pretty normal for when the strings are slackening off just after you put a new set on. I'll put new strings on adjust the floyd springs then play for a while and adjust them again until the strings have stretched out fully. At that point you shouldnt really need to touch the springs again until you put a new set on again or potentially if the strings are so dead they slacken off a bit more like if you have been using Ernie Ball strings for more than 2.5 hrs.
 

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This seems a bit daft to me. Tuners have an infinite amount of turns on them. There's only so far you can screw the claw into the body before you've gotta slacken it off again and resort to using the tuners.
 

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I do it that way
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah, studs are usually the thing that goes first. They're made of brass usually so are softer than the hardened steel of the knife edges. The Ibanez Edge studs are awesome though due to the shape of them so I don't find they really wear out.
Hmmm, are you sure? Where did you get this information?

I searched but found no information regarding material used in the studs for Gotoh Floyd.

Ibanez Edge seems to have steel studs, and they are made of Gotoh, so I'm sure they have hardened steel studs for Gotoh Floyd too.

My studs on the OFR are wearing out a bit and I can vaegly remeber seeing some sort of "brass-ish" color where the black has worn down. But I'm not sure either.
 

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The only way i would do this is if the bridge isn't in the right position and is very close to the tune I was using. But it almost always needs a tweak on the fines or machine heads.
 

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I do your mom that way. :agreed:
Ouch! Lol

My mom is 60 years old bro. Gross.
But I guess if I hadn't had sex with another person in the time you haven't I might be attracted to that too... Haha
 

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To the op, your friend is actually a smart dude.
When a floyd is out of tune to a certain extent, and you try to adjust via the fine tuners, every turn of a string tightens that string, but adds slag the the other's.
fine tuners are fine for adjusting one or two strings, but if all six are out, you will end up turning all six fine tuners over and over until there's no more left to turn, and still be out. So an easy way to put a full set of sharp or flat strings back in tune is to make a small turn to the string tension, leaving the fine tuners with some up or down adjustment to play with.
Sounds like your friend is more concerned with being in tune than having the bridge perfectly equidistant and being totally anal.
And besides, what do you care really? Nothing more annoying than the guy hanging over your shoulder asking " why don't you do it this way, it's better this way"..,.
 

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Funny enough, this is exactly what you do with the FRX (studmount Floyd), since the spring adjustment is up top. The instructions tell you to adjust the backstop until you get the bridge height you want, crank the spring down tight, tune up, back off the back stop, adjust the spring tension until the guitar is in tune. Ever since installing that thing on my LP, I wish I had it everywhere.
 

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adjusting the back springs would be fine as long as the bridge remains level. But yeah, that aint gonna happen for very long. sounds like your friend is from sevenstring.org
 

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Ouch! Lol

My mom is 60 years old bro. Gross.
But I guess if I hadn't had sex with another person in the time you haven't I might be attracted to that too... Haha
:lol: It was more directed at the OP than you, but a joke about doing your mom by screwing her from underneith was just too good to pass up. :lol:
 

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This is actually the ONLY way to properly tune a FR. You must adjust the spring tension until your strings AVERAGE the correct tension at pitch. If all of your strings are sharp, or all of your strings are flat, you cannot use the microtuners to fix this. They will only tune relative to the other strings, as the whole bridge floats.

If you start tuning the strings, by the time you get all 6 up or down to pitch, your original will be back to the similar wrong pitch you started with.

The only way to fix this is to unlock and retune from the headstock, or adjust the claw on the back of the guitar. In my experience, adjusting the claw actually maintains the bridge angle better than tuning from the headstock. As old strings stretch out, you will notice the bridge lifting if you tune from the headstock. If you adjust the claw instead, the bridge will constantly be setting back into its original setup position. Just with more tension on both the string side and the spring side.

I hope this was clear enough.... I have experience with EDGE, EDGE LOPRO, and OG Floyd Rose. I do not have experience with "zero stop" systems, and avoid them because I don't like the feel.
 
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