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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i did a search on "chris juergensen" and found nothing on this site
so i decided to contribute. :D

chrisjuergensen.com - Lessons and Articles

this is one of the best sites interms of music theory for the guitar i feel.
most sites give you diagrams and expect you to piece things together.
this site, he gives very descriptive information on scales, modes and chords
and how to use them... plus diagrams :D

it's useful for beginners, and advanced players who just want to brush up on their theory. who knows, maybe you'll learn something new??
 

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When I browsed his articles on modes I noticed that despite the Lydian mode being the fourth mode and the Mixolydian being the fifth mode(he even says this in his articles), he goes on to say that the Lydian mode can be found by moving a perfect fifth up from the root and the Mixolydian by moving a perfect fourth up. Which more or less flips them around. And this isn't a typo, it's constantly referred to as such throughout his articles(EDIT: Although I have noticed that once or twice they're listed correctly). To me personally this kind of makes me question his knowledge on theory but I'll still look through it all and see if I can pick anything up.

Thanks for the link still.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
i didn't really browse through the modes, mainly the chords section which i thought was useful, but darn... sorry about that. didn't mean to give a faulty website that can
screw up someones theory . :(

i use Guitar Chords
as well, but if doesn't give a description to the chords and scales like chris juergensen's
site does.
 

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When I browsed his articles on modes I noticed that despite the Lydian mode being the fourth mode and the Mixolydian being the fifth mode(he even says this in his articles), he goes on to say that the Lydian mode can be found by moving a perfect fifth up from the root and the Mixolydian by moving a perfect fourth up. Which more or less flips them around. And this isn't a typo, it's constantly referred to as such throughout his articles(EDIT: Although I have noticed that once or twice they're listed correctly). To me personally this kind of makes me question his knowledge on theory but I'll still look through it all and see if I can pick anything up.

Thanks for the link still.
Hello, I noticed traffic coming from this forum so I backtracked and found the post. I'd like to clear up the confusion.

Yes, the lydian mode is the 4th mode and the mixolydian mode is the 5th mode. BUT when you improvise using modes you are only given the chord as reference.

So for example, you are given a chart and G7 is written there for your solo section. As you like the way mixolydian sounds over dominant chords you will obviously want to play G mixolydian right?

What I am suggesting is that you think "up a 4th" from the CHORD. What is a 4th up from G? It is C. C major scale is the major scale you need to play. Right? G mixolydian is the 5th mode of C major. Up a 4th from G7 is C major.

This is called derivative thinking. Basically finding the proper major scale for the chord. This method is used for applying modes (or at least finding the major scale the mode is derived from).

Cmaj7 = C lydian

You have a Cmaj7 chord to play over.

lydian = major scale up a 5th

Up a 5th from C is G. G major is the major scale you need to play over the Cmaj7 chord to play C lydian.

Dorian = major scale down a 2nd.

Dmin7 and you want D dorian. Down a second from D is C. So C major and D dorian are the same scales.

Granted just superimposing the proper major scale will not make it a great solo. You will have to start on the proper chord tones.

If you are interested and want to see the first lesson which describes this thing in more detail, go to the modes section on the chrisjuergensen.com site.

Remember we only get the chord for reference so you really have to think from the chord.
 

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Wirelessly posted (A Destroyer of short people: Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; U; CPU iPhone OS 4_2_1 like Mac OS X; en-us) AppleWebKit/533.17.9 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/5.0.2 Mobile/8C148 Safari/6533.18.5)

Holy shit my brain just melted :lol:
 

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Ha ha ha! Don't let your brain melt.

The trick to modes (not the only one, but one of them) is to:

1. Learn how to play the major scale. When you can play all the major scale, all over the neck, in any key, you are set. There is really only five patterns. so it isn't really a big deal.

2. Learn the modes one at a time. Start with mixolydian for example (because that's what started the confusion but it might just as well be dorian or lydian).

3. Remember the rule for mixolydian: Major Scale up a 4th

4. Record a vamp of a dominant chord, let's say C7. A vamp means it just repeats itself, so a thousand bars of C7 or C9 or C7sus4, whatever.

5. Play the major scale that is a fourth away. A 4th away from C is F so play a F major scale over the C7 chord and you'll be playing C mixolydian

6. Make sure to start on a chord tone: C-E-G-Bb

7. repeat from #3 using a different chord.

You see whan you learn about modes in theory class, you learn that mixolydian in the 5th mode of the major scale. Now this is absolutely true but it doesn't help you on the spot. When you are playing, you only have the privilege of knowing the chord right? So here I am:

The chord on the chart is Bb7. I want Bb mixolydian. All I have to do is think to myself: up a 4th. Up a 4th from Bb is Eb. I play Eb major and I get Bb mixolydian.

Lydian = Major Scale up a 5th. So my next chord on the chart is Bbmaj7 and I want lydian. Up a 5th from Bb is F. I play F major starting on a Bb note (or another chord tone) and get myself a Bb lydian scale.

This system works if you are good at playing the major scale and prevents you from having to learn a separate pattern for every mode. You just learn to superimpose the major scale.

Some people think parallel, but that is another story.

-CJ
 

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welcome to the site Chris thanks for posting a follow up and providing some good information. Continue to stop by!
 

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Chrisj already explained it very well, but there's a fascinating section on this stuff in **** Goodrick's 'The Advancing Guitarist'.:yesway:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks, and I hope I cleared that up.
are you the real chris juergensen? if you are, i just wanted to say that i really learned a lot from your site. i really want to thank you for making such an informative website, and thats why i wanted to share it here in this forum.

thanks again, it really is an amazing site and direct a lot of friends towards it! :D
 

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Yes, its me. I often check where hits to my site come from and that's how I found this thread.

Glad you like the site. The lessons are mostly things I picked up over the last twenty years. They have been popular and made into books and have been translated into Japanese and Chinese. But I still leave them up for free so anyone can study. There is an Infinite Guitar Blog as well where I answer questions: theinfiniteguitar.blogspot.com/
 

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Holy shit my brain just melted :lol:
I think what he's getting at, in simpler terms is that if you're looking at a 7 chord, like G7, it HAS to be the V chord. It, in and of itself is mixolydian,However, if you go up from the V chord a 5th, it puts you at the IV note of that key, or Lydian mode.
 

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Don't think too much.

What I am saying is that G mixolydian is C major. We all agree with that right?

So if your chart says G7 and you want to play G mixolydian:

Up a 4th from G7 is C.

So if you play C major over G7, you get G mixolydian.

Please go here, and read this and I'm sure you'll understand (with very little brain melting). Here >>>
 

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This is a great place to start but eventually you want to cut out the middle man. I forget the exact chords originally talked about but instead of playing G major over G major 7 and then when the chord changes to G7 you go up a 4th, figure out what major key you are in and then play the mixolydian you should eventually just memorize the mixolydian.

It makes things much simplier. Then on G major 7 you play the G major and when it switches to G7 and you simply play G mixolydian. No taking the long way around. Just go directly to the source.

Again the method presented is a great place to start because you don't have to memorize the different patterns but eventually learning these patterns will cut out all this extra work just to get to the same place. If you know the correct scale strait from the root you can in a spit second move to that scale. Memorizing these scales as there own separate scale as opposed to in relation to the major scale is worth the work. Just take it one scale at a time while working on the method presented in this thread.
 
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