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OK, I can do any of the old Black Sabbath stuff, lead included. I have good technique. I can feel blues and play thru that. I am a long way to mastering legato. Good vibrato. I have done it so long that technique stuff does not bother me. I can tap through Bach's Toccata and Fugue excerpt, (that was a bitch) I taught myself to read and did Christopher Parkening's books, and hence can do things like Bach's inventions. (For two instruments, great). Anyway how about recommendations for songs that are reasonably to learn? Another great one I have is Mood For A Day. Love that. Point is I can play but I need focus. Jay
 

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It depends on where you want to go with your playing?

At a certain level, I would say start with Van Halen (a good bridge between blues and classical). So much rock stuff afterwards is based in their music, and the dyad/triad rhythm forms he used were a major difference from the earlier Sabbath stuff (although you hear it creeping in by the late '70s, and "Heaven and Hell" in particular has some good uses of it.)

Progressing from VH to Rhoads requires some Blackmore review to really do it right.

That leads to the obvious bridge to Malmsteen if you want to stay in the classical vein.

Thin Lizzy is good if you want to work on overall song-playing chops. They did lots of different stuff.

They other branch you can take from Eddie is the blues-based hair metal route, since DeMartini clearly is the bastard son of Van Halen and Joe Perry.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It depends on where you want to go with your playing?

At a certain level, I would say start with Van Halen (a good bridge between blues and classical). So much rock stuff afterwards is based in their music, and the dyad/triad rhythm forms he used were a major difference from the earlier Sabbath stuff (although you hear it creeping in by the late '70s, and "Heaven and Hell" in particular has some good uses of it.)

Progressing from VH to Rhoads requires some Blackmore review to really do it right.

That leads to the obvious bridge to Malmsteen if you want to stay in the classical vein.

Thin Lizzy is good if you want to work on overall song-playing chops. They did lots of different stuff.

They other branch you can take from Eddie is the blues-based hair metal route, since DeMartini clearly is the bastard son of Van Halen and Joe Perry.
WOW, lotsa homework. Thanks, Jay
 
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