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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I've always been good with computers. I'm the guy that gets dumb emails and calls from friends and family when they can't find their dumb cat pictures on they're computer or to ask if their "computer or just the tower is broken." However, aside from a handful of basic java and html classes, I don't know that much about in depth computing.
I've decided, in order to increase the amount of jobs I can apply for and for my own personal enjoyment and betterment, to learn some big new computer thing. I'm toying with learning either Perl or Python, but what do you guys think? I know a lot of you are heavy duty computer folks, and I'd just like to hear your thoughts.
 

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It really all depends on what you enjoy doing. Writing code isn't for everyone, and neither is networking, or being an OS/App support type.
 

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Retarded P.A Overlord.
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I started an apprenticeship a year ago in IT, level 3 BTEC and NVQ actually. My advice to would be to do something general first, then specialise later on. That is of course if you're going down the further education route. After this, I'm planning on specialising in networks and server management. However, if I were to do everything from home, I'd go the C++ or Perl route, preferably both :lol:
 

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Retarded P.A Overlord.
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I also second why Chris said. If you don't like what you're doing, it's the wrong job. Pick something you know you'll enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It really all depends on what you enjoy doing. Writing code isn't for everyone, and neither is networking, or being an OS/App support type.
I loved writing code when I knew how. I'm about to start a masters program in information and library sciences, so I really love systems. I just have no idea where to start because right now, I just know the philosophical and theory, not that actual method of application.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I also second why Chris said. If you don't like what you're doing, it's the wrong job. Pick something you know you'll enjoy.
As far as jobs go, I wasn't speaking specifically. I just meant that I love in depth computer stuff, and would like to learn something new. It also can't hurt my marketability as an employee either, especially the way the job market seems to be headed (employees having much wider job descriptions).
 
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