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Godin comes to mind as being very solid instruments with some really unique features, and they've really expanded their line the last few years.
Yeah, really that whole company kicks ass.

Also, EBMM makes more than just the JP7 :lol:

Pretty much every one I've played (guitar or bass) has sounded and felt great.
I'd love a Bongo baritone!! And the Silohette (sp?) kicks major ass.

washburn is in the same category as Peavey and Yamaha in that they have a lot of shitty cheap stuff out there, but the good stuff is incredible. Th Nuno I played felt and sounded godly.

I'm gonna throw in Laguna here. I've only ever played one, but it played and sounded really nice for the money. Kind of like what the modern Strat should be.
The Washburn N4's are awesome guitars.
 

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NSLALP
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13,286 Posts
My favorite guitar store back in Chicago had USA Hamers, USA Deans, and Framus guitars. I don't think any of them are underrated, I think they're just unknown because they're rare or uncommon. Those three are some of the finest guitars I've ever played... and they started at around $2k, if I recall. Flynn Guitars USA Hamer stock... all the way to the bottom, Sir Noodles. :agreed:

As for criminally underrated... Samick. Best starter instruments money can buy if you just give them a good setup.
 

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I don't like it.
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11,071 Posts
Yeah, really that whole company kicks ass.

I'd love a Bongo baritone!! And the Silohette (sp?) kicks major ass.

The Washburn N4's are awesome guitars.
As was the true Stevens Extended Cutaway, the EC-29 and EC-36. Mine, which I should have never sold:





I put an original Edge in mine, since I got it with no hardware or electronics, and an X2N and Lace Sensor. The Lace Sensor sounded fantastic, but the X2N never fit right to my ear, I should have swapped it for a D-Sonic or something more bitey.
 

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As was the true Stevens Extended Cutaway, the EC-29 and EC-36.
I briefly had an EC-36, which I also wish I still owned. The EC-36 was a bit difficult because you have to pick over the fretboard, but it's still a really fun guitar to play around with. With practice, I was able to get usable stuff up to the 33rd fret.
 

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I don't like it.
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11,071 Posts
I briefly had an EC-36, which I also wish I still owned. The EC-36 was a bit difficult because you have to pick over the fretboard, but it's still a really fun guitar to play around with. With practice, I was able to get usable stuff up to the 33rd fret.
I couldn't go past 24 :lol: But access to 24 was just astounding, plus the guitar looked amazing, and sometimes it was fun to tap around 27-29 :rofl: I also really liked how the Lace Sensor sounded in that position, it got some killer cleans. I really need to get more Lace Sensors, I've been really impressed with every one I've used thus far.

Forgot to mention, the Yamaha had a pop-in whammy bar, wasn't exactly like the Edge bar, but in a pinch it worked in an Edge trem :lol:
 

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Mr. Negative Pants, ,
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14,796 Posts
Some pics, these are at least 6 years old, ignore the mess :lol:



I LOVE these old RGXes... they had some really innovative ideas... the angle jack (way before Ibanez did them), the split bolt-on plates (way before AANJ) and a height-adjustable locking nut.

If memory serves, these were 24 3/4" scale too, weren't they Adam?
 

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I'm full of Hell...
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411 Posts
Washburn, IMO
:yesway: Washburn sure has it's share of low end, crap but their mid and upper level guitars are awesome.

Though it's been sort of ignored lately I love my Washburn Idol. It's a Korean import prototype and is one of only eight made. I'd put it up against any Gibson LP Standard or Studio and maybe even a couple of Customs...







Mahogany body w/ maple cap
Set in maple neck
Ebony fretboard
EMG 81/85
Grover 18:1 tuners
MOP inlays

And the one that made my heart go pitterpatter yet got away...

 

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I don't like it.
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11,071 Posts
I LOVE these old RGXes... they had some really innovative ideas... the angle jack (way before Ibanez did them), the split bolt-on plates (way before AANJ) and a height-adjustable locking nut.

If memory serves, these were 24 3/4" scale too, weren't they Adam?
Yep, and that's where I first saw the back routed angle jack, always loved the design aspects of that guitar. The trem was also incredibly stable, it had replaceable knife edges like the Edge, but IMO it had better, more solid saddles, they seemed to be made out of steel, not pot metal.
 
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