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I am Groot
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Well, that's just all sorts of awesome.
 

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...
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Very cool video and rendition of the song :yesway:

I really hope they used those carbon fiber cellos to record it, because it definitely sounds great. There's one or two places where there's a third part dubbed in, so it's definitely not a live performance (also evidenced by the complete lack of microphones :lol: ), but a great performance either way.

Really makes me wish I'd learned cello as a kid.
 

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Dream Crusher
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wirelessly posted :)yesway:: Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 2.2.1; en-us; DROIDX Build/VZW) AppleWebKit/533.1 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/533.1 480X854 motorola DROIDX)

There are quite a few overdubs, and plenty of post-processing. Cellos (even when played by world-class musicians) are rarely so crisp and smooth when chugging away like that.
 

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Mod Britannia
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I have to say, if I'd dropped several grand on a carbon fibre cello I'd damn well be using it on a recording I did. admittedly I've never heard one in person, but you're not going to drop the kind of money you have to to buy one without hearing one in person and liking the tone.
 

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Boogadee Oogadee
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i wonder, aren't classical string instruments ment to project awesome tone at a far distance (like a music hall)? would that mean that an ideal, pricey, tone-projecting instrument might be too much for a studio recording (not volume...) and maybe a less complex instrument needed for that application? is it similar to the world of amps - (this is a great band setting amp vs this one works fine, if you're in the studio and not competing against a band)?
 

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Dream Crusher
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have to say, if I'd dropped several grand on a carbon fibre cello I'd damn well be using it on a recording I did. admittedly I've never heard one in person, but you're not going to drop the kind of money you have to to buy one without hearing one in person and liking the tone.
Haha, it depends. Judging from the "related videos" these guys are getting around a bit in cello-playing circles... and $8k for a carbon-fiber cello isn't much in the world of classical instruments.

I've heard (but have not been able to corroborate) the Luis & Clark carbon fiber stuff swings well above its price range in terms of tonal quality, but I'd be surprised if your average ultra-conservative orchestra would want you using one onstage. The main advantage I see is durability and immunity to climate changes; if you're serious (and making a living at it) expect to spend $14-18k+ for an amazing wooden one.
 

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Boogadee Oogadee
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Haha, it depends. Judging from the "related videos" these guys are getting around a bit in cello-playing circles... and $8k for a carbon-fiber cello isn't much in the world of classical instruments.

I've heard (but have not been able to corroborate) the Luis & Clark carbon fiber stuff swings well above its price range in terms of tonal quality, but I'd be surprised if your average ultra-conservative orchestra would want you using one onstage. The main advantage I see is durability and immunity to climate changes; if you're serious (and making a living at it) expect to spend $14-18k+ for an amazing wooden one.
yeah... 10 or so years ago, my wife's viola was appraised at $10k+... and i'm sure it's more now.....
 

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This video proves that you don't need guitars, distortion or a big amp to be metal as fuck. :metal:
 

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I am Groot
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Haha, it depends. Judging from the "related videos" these guys are getting around a bit in cello-playing circles... and $8k for a carbon-fiber cello isn't much in the world of classical instruments.
You beat me to the punch. In the guitar world, a carbon fiber instrument is still an expensive novelty. In the classical world, they are far less expensive than the "real" thing. Then again, the rock/metal world is the only place where you can perform professionally with an inexpensive instrument. Even stepping away from the ridiculous prices of the classical and jazz worlds, I certainly don't see bluegrass musicians performing on a $600 Dean banjo or $500 Yamaha acoustic guitar. They're dropping $3000 on a Gibson Mastertone and $2200 on a Martin D-28 to start, and substantially more for something from the small cottage industry that exists throughout North Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee.

I've heard (but have not been able to corroborate) the Luis & Clark carbon fiber stuff swings well above its price range in terms of tonal quality, but I'd be surprised if your average ultra-conservative orchestra would want you using one onstage. The main advantage I see is durability and immunity to climate changes; if you're serious (and making a living at it) expect to spend $14-18k+ for an amazing wooden one.
This is just one more example of why I avoid much of the modern classical world. There is just not much progression, as they still worship the compositions and instruments from centuries past. People are drawn to wood because it is familiar, not because it is the ideal building material. The weaknesses of wood, and the bracing uses to compensate for them, is a constant battle for a builder between structural integrity and tone. Bracing causes dead spots on the soundboard, causing certain frequencies to be diminished. I've played several Rainsongs, and I'm always surprised by how rich and full sounding they are. It's like someone took the wet blanket off of a speaker, and you're finally hearing the instrument as it was intended to be heard. Why pay more for something inferior?
 
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