Metal Guitarist Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was talking to my manager at work the other day (he 6'5" and stocky) he is looking into getting a guitar but the dude has huge hands.

I did some searching @ Guitar Center but large fret boards are not a searchable feature :rofl:

On top of that the guy is left handed.

He just wants something to learn on so what kind of options does a guy like him in his situation have?

I figured the hive mind here at MetalGuitarist.org would have some good advice

ETA

Mods meant to post in Instrument board
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
Maybe look at a baritone like the PRS SE 277 or the hagstrom viking baritone (don't know if they do lefties of those off the top of my head, though). Could also get a regular strat/tele and get a baritone conversion neck from warmoth.
 

·
Hates Richie Kotzen
Joined
·
14,719 Posts
24.75"s, especially ones with 24 frets, can get a little cramped if you have longer fingers. Not undoable by any means, but just keep it in mind if you are a serious lead dude.

Depending on how much you want to spend, or if you want to refret, that can be averted by doing tall skinny frets, forget the numeric code for that size off the top of my head. The kind of frets vintage Rhoads have rule.

Other than that I would say anything goes. Loads of tall guys with big hands can pull off 25.5/24.75 just fine.
 

·
Resident Winger Overlord
Joined
·
4,287 Posts
I would be looking at something with a thicker neck. A lot of signature models I've seen have that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,428 Posts
My dad has pretty sausagey fingers and does just fine on his old Telecaster.

That said, has he thought about playing bass, instead? Bigger necks, bigger strings, more string-to-string distance, etc, etc.
 

·
Safe Spaces Advocate
Joined
·
3,125 Posts
What about a classical guitar or one meant for finger-style playing?
 

·
Guiterrorizer
Joined
·
15,696 Posts
If he has never learned then get him to start right handed. The bernie marsden PRS SE has a fat neck though it may be a bit tough to find.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,157 Posts
Anything with a baseball bat neck should suit. The Richie Kotzen Tele has a real slugger of a neck, but they don't make that in a lefty. Try Schecter too, many of their necks are of the 'fatter' variety.

I agree with above though, if he's only just starting it would well be worth going right handed instead. I know of a few guys who 're-trained' themselves and went from left to right handed and it makes everything so much easier further down the road.
 

·
Hates Richie Kotzen
Joined
·
14,719 Posts
What about a classical guitar or one meant for finger-style playing?
Nah dude, you've got that one backwards. it's exactly the opposite, you are better off with short stubby fingers for classical guitar. Most of the really good classical guys skew that way, most notably Andres Segovia, who is *the* name in classical guitar to the average person. Traditional classical technique does not involve position shifts used in the same way as electric, there are comparitively way fewer. If you play classical guitar for a life time your fingers actually curl up/shorten. Playing classical guitar seriously is murder on the hands, It applies even more to the picking hand than the fretting hand. If you have longish fingers, the way you arch them on the picking hand can end up super uncomfortable fast. When I play I seriously wish the fingers on my picking hand were shorter, because anchoring techniques/muting/whatever. Long fingers/lengthy proportions cause a lot of strain on an instrument that already involves a ridiculous amount of strain.

Classical guitar has so many problems with stuff like swelling, etc. if you have long fingers too as you get older arthritis is going to make things almost unusable.

It throws a lot of people for a loop at first. If you are in a room with a bunch of people you don't know and you have to pick the ones that are good at classical guitar it's not going to be the ones with spidery fingers. It's going to be the dudes with bloated,disgusted, sickly looking hands with serious circulation problems. Not even joking about that. You want to play classical guitar, say goodbye to your right hand. :lol:

If you are serious about classical guitar, your right hand is going to end up a bloated mess. The dudes with relatively longish/thin fingers like Julian Breem are in the minority.

Pepe Romero, Andres Segovia, etc. etc. etc.

The whole "long fingers = technical skill/ease of playing" thing is a pretty modern electric guitar trope.







 

·
M3 Aficionado
Joined
·
1,278 Posts
What about a classical guitar or one meant for finger-style playing?
Depends.
Nah dude, you've got that one backwards. it's exactly the opposite, you are better off with short stubby fingers for classical guitar.
Depends.

I've dealt with this for years. Just as necks can be any combination of thick/thin and wide/narrow, "big fingers" can mean different things. Wide, thick, long, stubby, pointy, blunt, etc. are not mutually exclusive. You can have wide fingers, but if they're "thin" from the top of the nail to the pad of the finger, you can play narrow (close string spacing) necks fine. Ditto if you've got thick/stubby fingers, but with pointy tips. If you're like me, "thick" (again, top of nail, to pad of finger) and blunt fingers, narrow necks are problematic, especially if you like thicker strings. I've played guitars where fretting on the first or second fret means that either my nail or pad will touch an adjacent string, regardless of how carefully I place my fingers. For a while, I tuned down a step and caopo'ed at the 2nd fret. Then one day, I measured the width at the third fret and it was 1-7/8"

If you're looking for acoustic (I know you're not), "finger style" guitars with with 1-13/16", 1-7/8", 1-15/18" and even 2.0" necks are relatively easy to find.

When it comes to electrics, there is Big Lou Guitars, which is as close to "regular retail" I can think of. Jim Soloway was making electrics with "finger picking" necks (1-13/16"), but he's not making guitars any more. Maybe you can find a used Soloway.

Warmoth and USA Custom Guitars make replacement necks with 1-7/8" wide necks. Warmoth are drop-in replacements. USA Custom requires a bit of widening of the neck pocket.

And. of course, there are a number of custom builders that will build a custom guitar with a wider neck.

I've taken a (temporary) different route. I have a Revenger-7 that I've replaced the bridge with a top-load six-string bridge, and the nut with a 1-7/8" wise 6-string nut. As a proof of concept, it works great and I won't go back to necks with standard string spacing. I've got other "stringectomy" projects planned, but they're just to hold me over until I can build something completely custom.

That said, be sure that the issue truly is thick, blunt fingers, and not just finger placement issues.

Ray
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top