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NSLALP
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13,286 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
SPACE.com -- Heftiest Star Discovery Shatters Cosmic Record

R136a1 is the most massive star ever found. It was born at over 320 solar masses, breaking the previously-theorized maximum of 150 solar masses. Its surface temperature is about 7 times that of our own sun's at 40,000 oC, and has about 10,000,000 times the luminosity. The nebula from which it spawned is loaded with these giants.

Space.com said:
Stars between approximately eight and 150 solar masses end their brief lives in supernova explosions, leaving behind exotic remnants in the form of either neutron stars or black holes.

With the discovery of stars weighing between 150 and 300 solar masses, the study's findings raise the prospect of the existence of exceptionally bright, "pair instability supernovae" that blow themselves apart. These exploding stars fail to leave any remnants, and disperse up to ten solar masses of iron into their surroundings.




:leon:
 

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NSLALP
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13,286 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I deem that thing true. :metal: I forgot about VY CMa.

According to Wiki it has 1/10 the luminosity of the new one, and its mass is 15-25 solar masses. So at 1/13th the weight or so, it seems to be emitting slightly more efficiently on a mass basis. However, R136a1 is something like 30 solar radii, while VY CMa fluctuates on the order of 1,000-2,000 solar radii. I guess it's the real fat old sun.

It grows and shrinks at 50 km/s :eek:
 

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Premium Member
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23,428 Posts
Heh, there's nothing "old" about that object. It will die before it reaches it's first birthday (in stellar timescales).
 

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Guiterrorizer
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15,696 Posts
Heh, there's nothing "old" about that object. It will die before it reaches it's first birthday (in stellar timescales).
"*sniff* and it was so young too!"

do explain..
 

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Reverend Secret Flower
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"*sniff* and it was so young too!"

do explain..
The bigger (more mass) and hotter a star burns, the shorter its life. Its pretty proportional, so a unheard of monster star is gonna burn out(or go supernova more likely) very very quickly in terms of star lifetimes
 
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