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I don't like it.
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11,071 Posts
Retarded. Alcohol and flavor boiled off. Try just eating fryer oil. 'Nuff said.
I'll try it and let you know. Alcohol doesn't boil off like the common myth says it does. I'm pretty sure Alton Brown has covered this on Good Eats, but I couldn't quote him without finding the episode. Also, the alcohol would have a hard time boiling off inside of the pouches they're putting it in, especially if the liquid isn't coming out...
 

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NSLALP
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13,286 Posts
I didn't see anything about pouches, so that changes things. Ethyl alcohol boils at 173 degF, however. Fried things are usually getting cooked at 350+ degF.
 

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NSLALP
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13,286 Posts
For mere moments, not for any extended period of time.
I don't know how long it's going to be in there, it depends on what you're cooking. If the alcohol reaches that temperature (subject to change given a few other variables), it's gone. If not, it's not.

If there is a fried thing that gets me drunk, please let me know, but this all just sounds lame.
 

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I don't like it.
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11,071 Posts
I don't know how long it's going to be in there, it depends on what you're cooking. If the alcohol reaches that temperature (subject to change given a few other variables), it's gone. If not, it's not.

If there is a fried thing that gets me drunk, please let me know, but this all just sounds lame.
They're going to be carding, so supposedly it is going to have alcohol still. I read another article about it, and the guy who came up with it says it still has the alcohol in it...
 

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I am Groot
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32,450 Posts
Beer does not need to be improved upon.
 

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Is Actually Recording
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32,765 Posts
Can they add bacon somehow?
Wrapped in bacon, dipped in ranch?

That actually sounds kinda gross. I think I'm with Dave. :lol:
 

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Pallin' around
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9,532 Posts
I didn't see anything about pouches, so that changes things. Ethyl alcohol boils at 173 degF, however. Fried things are usually getting cooked at 350+ degF.
You are correct. The more important thing to look at is the latent heat of vaporization. Ethanol has a very low latent heat of vaporization. That is why it evaporates quickly at room temperature and pressure. That is also how they distill and concentrate hard alcohol, because at a temperature lower than 100 Celsius the ethanol evaporates while the water stays in the liquid phase. Then the ethanol is condensed in tubing (usually copper), and bingo, you have moonshine.
 

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NSLALP
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13,286 Posts
You are correct. The more important thing to look at is the latent heat of vaporization. Ethanol has a very low latent heat of vaporization. That is why it evaporates quickly at room temperature and pressure. That is also how they distill and concentrate hard alcohol, because at a temperature lower than 100 Celsius the ethanol evaporates while the water stays in the liquid phase. Then the ethanol is condensed in tubing (usually copper), and bingo, you have moonshine.
My thermo-fu is weak. Have to get out Gaskell to remember what the hell you're talking about. :lol:
 

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I am Groot
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32,450 Posts
You are correct. The more important thing to look at is the latent heat of vaporization. Ethanol has a very low latent heat of vaporization. That is why it evaporates quickly at room temperature and pressure. That is also how they distill and concentrate hard alcohol, because at a temperature lower than 100 Celsius the ethanol evaporates while the water stays in the liquid phase. Then the ethanol is condensed in tubing (usually copper), and bingo, you have moonshine.
No, you then put it in charred oak casks for 12+ years, and bingo, you have Scotch. :yesway:
 
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