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Discussion Starter #1
Saw a classifieds ad for a cool guitar for a good price. However, it's apparently been without strings for 5 years. Would the neck be completely ruined by this if the truss rod hasn't been loosened?
 

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Hard to say - it would really depend on the conditions it was stored in, how stable the neck wood is, etc.
 

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5 years is an awful long time.

Generally speaking the answer is "not necessarily". But that's predominantly for shorter periods of time. Obviously makers of bolt on necks can leave them laying around their factories for a long time without risking damage.

Depends on too many factors to say for sure though. Also quartersawn will fare better than flatsawn. Quartersawn is pretty standard on more modern guitars, but on vintage stuff it's not.

I've bought a number of necks from 80s guitars that were "Stand alone". Never bothered asking the seller how they were stored, though some stated in the listing.

Some were fucked and some were OK.

Depends on humidity too. Like cars with rust, coastally located guitars fare way worse and "Age" quicker. A lot of people located on the coast talk about seasonal truss rod tweaks and I'm just like, "uhhhhhhhhhhhh what?".
 

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It's a Charvel Avenger for 300€ - so thin neck I guess, but probably quite modern construction. In winter indoor air can be super dry and in summer moisture can be really high, so there can definitely be a lot of moisture and temperature shifts during that time.

I first thought the trem had been upgraded as well, but apparently the JT-570 is made by Schaller. Bridge pickup has been changed to a Dimarzio, so I guess someone's done some routing as well.
 

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Does it have a 2 way truss rod? You should be able to give it back bow if the truss rod has given it a forward bow if left with tension on.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I also misread the ad a bit, apparently the guy's had it for 5 years and it's been without strings for 2.
 

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It's a Charvel Avenger for 300€ - so thin neck I guess, but probably quite modern construction. In winter indoor air can be super dry and in summer moisture can be really high, so there can definitely be a lot of moisture and temperature shifts during that time.

I first thought the trem had been upgraded as well, but apparently the JT-570 is made by Schaller. Bridge pickup has been changed to a Dimarzio, so I guess someone's done some routing as well.
Those are flat sawn. I have a Charvel Spectrum from the same period and the neck is pretty thin, but obviously that period of Jackson/Charvel is some of my favorite construction on guitars ever. I'm not sure what you consider that modern, but those are '89-'92 era. Most likely a '90 or '91 in your case.

I haven't personally seen a fucked bolt on neck from that era, since the construction is quite good, but that is by no means a guarantee. Especially in a coastal area without strings for prolonged time periods.

It's actually neck twist you have to watch out for when storing without strings, like Cobra Commander said.

Great necks though. My favorite thin bolt on necks out there. And that was the highest quality period in the history of Japanese Jackson/Charvel guitar construction.
 

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I also misread the ad a bit, apparently the guy's had it for 5 years and it's been without strings for 2.
Can you see it in person? Should be pretty apparent.

Generally speaking up to a year should be fine. Some people take it super seriously, but I never have on double locking guitars. There's such a thing as being so worried about always keeping it under tension you can never dive bomb and only replace one string at a time. :lol: I know people like that. If it was that fragile it wouldn't have a double locking floating trem.

Depends if it was indoors or in a storage unit too. I've bought quite a few "bulk" vintage neck listings from storage units. Over a year in a coastal area with large seasonal fluctuations in both temperature and humidity in non indoors storage is indeed a cause for concern, but good pictures or seeing it in person should clear it up.

Those are the best shreddy bolt on necks you can get though. Anything '89-'92 MIJ Jackson Charvel is gold and generally speaking holds up quite well.

The scarf joint method of neck construction, particularly the JC MIJ variant, also holds up quite well, even on flatsawn necks. That's part of the reason those necks withstand the ravages of time so well.

 

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Can you see it in person? Should be pretty apparent.

Generally speaking up to a year should be fine. Some people take it super seriously, but I never have on double locking guitars. There's such a thing as being so worried about always keeping it under tension you can never dive bomb and only replace one string at a time. :lol: I know people like that. If it was that fragile it wouldn't have a double locking floating trem.

Depends if it was indoors or in a storage unit too. I've bought quite a few "bulk" vintage neck listings from storage units. Over a year in a coastal area with large seasonal fluctuations in both temperature and humidity in non indoors storage is indeed a cause for concern, but good pictures or seeing it in person should clear it up.

Those are the best shreddy bolt on necks you can get though. Anything '89-'92 MIJ Jackson Charvel is gold and generally speaking holds up quite well.

The scarf joint method of neck construction, particularly the JC MIJ variant, also holds up quite well, even on flatsawn necks. That's part of the reason those necks withstand the ravages of time so well.

Just yesterday I was looking at my sabre and wondering, again, why they two-piece the neck near the headstock bend. Should have been obvious. You guys know so much. I am not very good but have been fooling with guitars for forty years. All just totally on my own like everything else.
 

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Just yesterday I was looking at my sabre and wondering, again, why they two-piece the neck near the headstock bend. Should have been obvious. You guys know so much. I am not very good but have been fooling with guitars for forty years. All just totally on my own like everything else.
So it looks like a quarter sawn neck would have more resistance to forward/backward warping while the width of the quarter sawn neck would tend to minimize side warping. Very good.
 

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So it looks like a quarter sawn neck would have more resistance to forward/backward warping while the width of the quarter sawn neck would tend to minimize side warping. Very good.
And I guess leaving it strung tends to stabilize the neck from what I read here.
 

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So it looks like a quarter sawn neck would have more resistance to forward/backward warping while the width of the quarter sawn neck would tend to minimize side warping. Very good.
Quarter sawn is absolutely theoretically better than flat sawn, but ultimately it matters more if whoever made it knew what they were doing. :lol:

On more modern stuff quartersawn is pretty much the standard, but disregarding flatsawn leaves out a ton of awesome vintage guitars.
 

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I wouldn't buy it personally. If the thing has been neglected for two years, the current owner probably didn't take good care of it before that point either.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I wouldn't buy it personally. If the thing has been neglected for two years, the current owner probably didn't take good care of it before that point either.
Good point. Eh, perhaps I have enough guitars for now.
 

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I wouldn't buy it personally. If the thing has been neglected for two years, the current owner probably didn't take good care of it before that point either.
It wasn't in the OP, but he mentioned later the model in question was a 30 year old Jackson Charvel super obscure bolt on Rhoads made for a year or two with a mega bizarre slanted double single bridge pickup that almost every owner routed for a proper humbucker. So I'm assuming he is after a bit of a project.



In all my time buying guitars from those years, I've bought maybe 2-3 hat were impressively well cared for that showed up with like, hyrdrated fretboards and cases containing itemized receipts of the original purchase and the work and service done over the years. :lol: You're actually better off buying the ones where the dudes tell you "yeah, it's been sitting in the bottom of a lake for three years" than the ones where the guys throw in a bunch of obviously BS buzzwords like "98.239% of fret life left! Neck straight as an arrow!" and then when it shows up it's clear it has also been sitting at the bottom of a lake for three years.

If the seller tells you that it's been properly cared for for 30 years and they aren't the original owner and the pictures aren't super impressive there is a near 100% they are BSing you with how good they are making it sound. The only place you actually see really well cared for guitars that have been owned by single owners for that span of time and adequately cared for all along are like early 90s Tom Andersons.
 

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FWIW OP, my number one beater is a toothpaste MIJ Charvel from the same years (nominally a year earlier, but essentially the exact same time period). That will be the exact same neck as the one you are looking at, except with a reverse headstock.

It showed up in pretty standard shape for a guitar from those years. These days it's as heavily modified as a guitar can get, all the hardware replaced, routed for a bridge humbucker, custom black scratchplate, etc. etc. etc. (actually still waiting on the correct pickguard screws, so ignore the shitty placeholders). The neck cleaned up really well after lemon oil/gorgomyte/leather dye.



Different manufacturers use different formulations for fretwire. You can't get every old guitar to the "mirror shine" level, but Jackson Charvels can do it. Rosewood withstands time better than ebony too and can usually be rehydrated pretty easily.

*If* you know what you are getting into and that's the kind of guitar you are after and it's not like, two thousand dollars, they are great beaters to have around. Do you have pictures? It's usually pretty easy to tell if you can get it back into nice shape.
 
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