Metal Guitarist Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since I have an itty bitty little 112, an Ikea cabinet, some blankets, an sm58, and arguably too much free time, I did this stupid shit. I present to you the Mäkämpquietür:





I know that stuffing the thing with that many blankets/pillows and using an empty tissue box as a mic stand probably ruins the whole point of doing something like this as opposed to using an iso cab, but at the very least it lets me get at least a tiny bit of volume out of my jca22h without rattling my fucking teeth out.

It sounds like this: (peavey tracer w/stock pickup straight into the overdrive channel. gain and volume are both around two. Single tracked, hi-passed, low-passed)

https://soundcloud.com/user-870397866/jca-mic-tracer-4-8-18

Has anyone tried anything like this and had it actually be worth the effort? Supposedly they move more air and sound a bit less boxy than an actual iso cab, but that's also assuming that they're not built out of fucking flatpack furniture.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
Yup I bought a Randall Isobox a few years ago and it sounded like ass. Sold it a couple days after getting it! One of my worst purchases ever.

It sounded great when opened up, but then the whole purpose was gone.
I recorded it A/B comparison.
This was before I knew what Kempers and stuff like that was, I wish I never threw my money on the isocab.

You're much better off with a unit like Two Notes Torpedo IR loaders. They are quieter (as in dead silent for the surroundings) and doesn't have that ugly "boxed in sound" that the Randall Isobox have.
IRs are very realistic sounding as long as you have a reactive load unit.


Regading your clip = it doesn't sound too bad :) but then again, as you mention later in the OP, that might explain why it sounds decent. A Randall Isobox will not sound pleasant.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks man! :D I'm still super new to actually using mics, so hopefully once I actually learn what I'm doing I'll get better results. :lol:

I think you're right, though. The Two Notes stuff is probably the way to go these days. Definitely more practical than this monstrosity. :lol:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
Or cheaper and even MORE convient just use something like this:


Then simply record the amp signal straight and you can change IRs in your DAW at any time instead of using a Torpedo and only be able to hard-record it... and then have to reamp or even worse re-record everything yourself if you want to change the sound.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
1,264 Posts
I had a home made, thick mdf iso box, with heavy damping etc... And it was big and a bit of a hassle.... I really like my Torpedo Live now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
428 Posts
I had the rivera silent sister - sounded good - was expensive.

that one uses pressure release to stop the boxy crap.

it wasn't that silent - but was pretty awesome.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The silent sister looks AWESOME, but man, that's a hard sell compared to the two notes stuff
 

·
Señor Member
Joined
·
12,297 Posts
I've got a Jet City ISO. It's serviceable but like others have said, it doesn't sound 1:1 with a mic'd cabinet in open space. There's a lotta voodoo in most explanations to "why" but the Rivera guys video is pretty accurate, where he says the closed space and pressure jumping around inside causes the diaphram of the mic to pull in and put like a plunger, which causes it to react like its constantly being overdriven. A lot of the rest of the explanations are a little bunk but that one is on point.

The way the Silent Sister works is that it has an offset chamber inside the cabinet with a maze that eventually leads to ports on the bottom. The concept is that air has some way to escape but all the twists and turns trap the sound waves enough that they don't come out of the cabinet very loud and what bit of them do are directed at the ground. It's a unique design but far from impossible to replicate or modify an existing cabinet to do. He's also got some bits in there about no square corners inside to help eliminate traps, but to the extent that even occurs, the foam in the cabinet takes care of it and you can probably add a little more inside the back of the speaker to take care of the rest.

With regard to the ports, this guy's setup is easy to replicate or modify to fit and functionally should do the same as the Silent Sister.


EDIT: As far as the DIY box goes, I tried something similar before I bought the Jet City. I got a large cardboard box and packed all 6 sides with 1 1/2" thick pink foam board, then stuck my Mesa 112 in it. It cut out the highs but it was almost exactly as loud as before, just with really thick bass noise. Nowhere near useable.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That porting system is super cool. Do you think it would make a difference in a larger enclosure? And I'm having the same bass problem. My box actually cuts out a fair amount of noise--in the room I'm in 3 on the volume used to be deafening and now it's medium tv volume. I can still feel a ton of bass though, too the point where it kind of makes me feel physically ill after a few minutes. Also, the back of the box is pretty thin and I think it starts to resonate if I get the volume in just the right place because one of the tracks I recorded had this giant octave effect. :lol:
 

·
Señor Member
Joined
·
12,297 Posts
I think the construction of your box helped with the amount of attenuation you're getting vs. my cardboard box setup. Everything I read online said that dense, rigid strictures with small gaps of air inside work best for limiting sound. Plywood is on the high side of practical materials but sheetrock and cement are on the higher end of the list. I'll let you know how my cement iso box works out :lol:

Larger enclosure probably helps, assuming the pressure doesn't build up as high, as fast. Still, if it's sealed well enough to get desired noise limiting effect, it's to be assumed that the microphone and speaker are being subject to the same forces. The 'plunger effect' will seemingly be an issue unless your cabinet is, well, the size of a room unless there's some form of air pressure relief. EDIT: Worth mention, I recorded a couple albums a few years back in a bathroom with moving blankets over the sink/toilet and draped over the cabinet and mic stand. The room was maybe 4x6 and this was a 412, but the recordings definitely had NO plungering effect, although I'm sure that's a mixture of the added size but also imperfect sealing of the room itself.

I know "workaround" is a dirty term, but even before getting into the porting thing, I noticed I got much more useable sounds with the volume turned down. I know, I know, the wet dream of the isolation cabinet is to have your amp recording on 10 while your baby sleeps next door, but when I say "turned down" I meant like 1/3rd to 1/2 of the way rather than 3/4 or 10/10 like I tried the first few times. As I said, I believe the 'plunger effect' causes the microphone to act as if it's being bludgeoned with volumes higher than what it's actually hearing (because of the amount of deflection going on in the diaphragm). By lightening the load a little, I noticed the guitars didn't sound like they're hitting the floor and ceiling constantly, likely because they're not hitting the microphone as hard but also because I'm sure there's substantially less pressure being created inside and thus, less deflection.

I know that sounds like a total buzzkill but yeah, keep in mind that's still blistering loud if you're standing infront of it opened and well into the volume levels a modern style amp should be "sounding like itself" but still in the room, quiet enough that you can have a conversation next to it.

But yeah, to your point, a large box and/or porting and/or adjusting your volume will all help with your results.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You're not being a buzzkill at all! 3/10 seems to be where this particular amp starts sounding its best, so if I can get it that far I'm happy. Haven't tried going much further yet, because I'm honestly afraid. :lol: Gonna try experimenting with porting and reinforcing the back panel and see if that takes care of my bass issues, because that's the main thing keeping the whole thing from being usable at this point.

Definitely post your cement box when it's done! That's an awesome idea!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Update: I took my my cab out of the box and recorded some stuff at ~high conversation volume as a comparison. It sounds much better that way. :lol:
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top