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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Well, after all these years I'm really starting to work on lead/chops a bunch these days. I have an issue right now with playing a few lead riffs clean when I've got gain on the amp.

For example, this:

E|-------------------------------------
B|-----15h18p15----15h18p15-------
G|----------------17------------17----
D|-------------------------------------
A|-------------------------------------
E|-------------------------------------
B|-------------------------------------

My LH fingering for this 4 note repeating pattern is 1-3-1-2

Questions:

1. When you finish the pull off from 18 to 15 and head down to pick 17 on the G string, how do you stop the B string from ringing? What part of your left or right hand is stopping it? I'm trying to make it so that when I put 2nd finger down on 17 on G string, it sort of mutes the B string.
2. After picking 17 on the G string, you want it to stop so that you can cleanly hear the next note when you start the pattern again (15 on the B string) by itself when you pick it. How do you do that? When I pull my finger off the G string 17th fret it rings out. When I try to mute with my RH I end up muting too much. I'm trying to position 1st finger on 15th fret of B such that it just touches G string enough to mute it, but that is certainly a challenge that would be difficult once I start moving around the fretboard more.

Yeah I know i need to practice it more.. and I will. Just looking for some tips.

Thanks in advance for your help.
 

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NSLALP
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Drink more beer. It won't matter as much. :drew:
:squint:

My comments in bold:
1. When you finish the pull off from 18 to 15 and head down to pick 17 on the G string, how do you stop the B string from ringing? What part of your left or right hand is stopping it? I'm trying to make it so that when I put 3rd finger down on 17 on G string, it sort of mutes the B string.

Your pick should push through the G string and land firmly against the B string. This will make a smooth connection between the notes while instantly muting the B string.

2. After picking 17 on the G string, you want it to stop so that you can cleanly hear the next note when you start the pattern again (15 on the B string) by itself when you pick it. How do you do that? When I pull my finger off the G string 17th fret it rings out. When I try to mute with my RH I end up muting too much. I'm trying to position 1st finger on 15th fret of B such that it just touches G string enough to mute it, but that is certainly a challenge that would be difficult once I start moving around the fretboard more.

Your fretting finger should simply lift off the fret and maintain contact with the string. That, possibly combined with a little help from your picking palm depending on the situation (not this one, I'd say) will shut that bitch up. You have to practice very slowly playing a note, and then raising your finger off but maintaining contact to mute.

One more piece of advice here, I'd finger this 1-3-2-1 instead of 1-3-1-3. I call this a crossover, and it's the best way to do these little speed licks.
 

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\m/ Tits & Beer \m/
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This is one of those pentatonic licks that come naturally to you after playing it a million times. Usually guitarists tend to bend the 17th fret on the G string up a whole step to make the lick flow more and/or to get that bluesy. But of course doing this will most likely result in pulling off the open G string, (hiyo...)

My advice is to try this:
- Use your index and ring finger to execute the 15-18-15 on the B String. When you go for the 17th fret on the G use your middle finger instead. That way, you can still keep your index finger on the B string to keep it from ringing and have a strong finger to pull that 17th fret a whole step if you want that smooth transition back into the lick.
 

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- Use your index and ring finger to execute the 15-18-15 on the B String. When you go for the 17th fret on the G use your middle finger instead. That way, you can still keep your index finger on the B string to keep it from ringing and have a strong finger to pull that 17th fret a whole step if you want that smooth transition back into the lick.
:agreed: 1-4-1-3 is probably the way to go here. If at the end of the lick you need to bend that 18th fret not up to the octave, try "reinforcing" the bend with your third finger behind the pinkie.

As for stopping the notes from bleeding together... Muting technique is one of those things that's awfully hard to explain, initially kind of confusing, but once you get the hang of it you do it almost without thinking. Basically what you're going to want to do here is a combination of a couple things (some or all):

  • slightly lift your pointer finger off the B string as you go down to the G string, not a full pull off exactly as much as just releasing most of the pressure on the string, so the note chokes off.
  • As you fret the note on the G string, allow the fleshy part of your ring finger to touch the B string, further muting it
  • As you go back up to the B string, re-apply pressure to the string at the 15th fret, and as you release the G string do so in a similar manner to the way you released the B, where you don't pull off as much as just let up the pressure so the note isn't cleanly fretted.

Also, I don't know how much gain you're using, but there's two approaches to having a "clean' sounding technique. One is just to have killer muting technique, but the other is to be very cognizant about the amount of gain you're using. If you have a fairly fluid, responsive distortion sound, with even-enough picking and legato technique you often don't need tons of gain to solo. And, if you're not using an extremely saturated sound, then ever-so-slight resonances and rings and whatnot won't be jacked up to almost the same level as the notes you mean to play, meaning you'll sound a lot cleaner for it.
 

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I don't have a specific technique in mind when I do this, but I'm pretty sure that what I do unconsciously is to mute the B string with my third finger as it frets the G string. It's not that difficult to do, since the finger tends to approach the neck at an angle anyway. That must be the way my playing evolved, since I never had to deal with this problem, even while using tons of gain.

I usually would fret the 18th fret in this situation with my pinky. I think it's very valuable to build up your pinky strength so that you can maintain position discipline--this will help in building up speed.
 

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Canis lupis robertus
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I find "clean" playing is generally a combination of -

1) Familiarity with your instrument. It's almost unconscious.
2) A combination of muting with your fingers and your picking hand (usually the edge of the palm, for me).
3) Accurate and speedy placement of your fret hand fingers, which generally comes from repetition, repetition, repetition.
 

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Reverend Secret Flower
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I'm with angel on this one. I would totally use pointer and ring for the b string and middle on the g.


I'm mister speed demon break neck speed player, so when i have a part i'm trying to get to sound a certian way at speed, i really just sit there and do it at a super slow rate. Watch some tv or something and just do it slowly and let the motion burn into your brain till its not really a though but an instinct. Then start speeding it up, but take time with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the help everyone.

Made a mistake in my original post. I finger it 1-3-1-2 (pointer, ring, pointer, middle) like people are suggesting (correcting my original post now.)

I'm still at work. Be fiddling with this tonight. Thanks!
 

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Thanks for the help everyone.

Made a mistake in my original post. I finger it 1-3-1-2 (pointer, ring, pointer, middle) like people are suggesting (correcting my original post now.)

I'm still at work. Be fiddling with this tonight. Thanks!
Still not what I would do. Pointer, pinkie, pointer, ring. Try it. I might feel awkward at first if you're not used to soloing with your pinkie, but as you get stronger it'll be way smoother.
 

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Pallin' around
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Still not what I would do. Pointer, pinkie, pointer, ring. Try it. I might feel awkward at first if you're not used to soloing with your pinkie, but as you get stronger it'll be way smoother.
This is how I do it too. However, if there is more than one way to do it, learn both. A lot of the time the way I finger a specific lick has to do with the lick that precedes or follows the lick in question. It is always good to be able to do things more ways than one.
 

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This is how I do it too. However, if there is more than one way to do it, learn both. A lot of the time the way I finger a specific lick has to do with the lick that precedes or follows the lick in question. It is always good to be able to do things more ways than one.
It's not about a "finger specific lick" as much as it is about fingering efficiency though. For "box" position licks, the most efficient way to finger them is one finger per fret. Pointer on the first fret, middle on the second, ring on the third, and pinkie on the 4th (and 5th, as needed). Yes, there are occasionally reasons to finger licks differently, but for efficient technique it's tough to beat this as a "default" starting point.
 

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Pallin' around
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It's not about a "finger specific lick" as much as it is about fingering efficiency though. For "box" position licks, the most efficient way to finger them is one finger per fret. Pointer on the first fret, middle on the second, ring on the third, and pinkie on the 4th (and 5th, as needed). Yes, there are occasionally reasons to finger licks differently, but for efficient technique it's tough to beat this as a "default" starting point.
I totally agree, but if the lick had a variation such as:

E|-------------------------------------
B|-----15h18p15----15h20p15-------
G|----------------17------------17----
D|-------------------------------------
A|-------------------------------------
E|-------------------------------------
B|-------------------------------------

Then I would finger it 1 3 2 1 4 2 so that the 18 hammer-on is with the 3rd finger, and the 20th is with the 4th. That is the reason that I would learn how to do it both ways. Otherwise I totally agree with you, one finger per fret is the most efficient way to go.
 

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That;s just because your pinkie stretch sucks. :fawk:


(make that 15h18h20p18p15 and you might have a case though)
 

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It's just plain inconvenient to hammer onto the eighteenth fret, pull off to the fifteenth, and then hammer onto the twentieth all with one finger. Much easier, faster, and cleaner to use multiple fingers. :2cents:
 

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:shrug: It really depends on what you've been practicing, I guess. I spent a while working on pinkie dexterity back in the day, so before posting this I picked up a guitar and gave this a try, and it was pretty comfortable for me at a brisk tempo.

EDIT - we're getting REALLY far afield, though. :lol: As long as the guy has the pinkie dexterity such that using it is an option, then he's in the clear. :yesway:
 
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