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Got you covered on the embed. :yesway:

Great video man, I assume this is you? Direct and to the point the way these kind of things should be. Side note - I have the maple boarded version of that Suhr you're playing, good choice.
 

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There is more to refining than just random chords and single note runs. How to create killer profiles comes with a lot of techniques / tricks that no one shares. But still a cool vid that gets directly to the point
 

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Cool vid!!!

I usually place some kind of sound dampeners around the amp/mic. I've used something as simple as a few moving blankets on a mic stand and over the head to eliminate any sound reflections in the room.

Using a mixer is a great way to make profiles using multiple mics. You can place them wherever you wish, and mix them to the sound you like. This helps to get the low end that is sometimes missing on some single mic profiles that are close to the cone. I put a mic at the edge of the speaker (or even off the speaker) and EQ out anything but the low end on that mic. The only thing you have to watch out for is phasing, but you can hear it when it happens. The low end seems to disappear completely. Just move one of the mics, until the phasing goes away.

During the refinement, I usually chug a few muted notes on A and low E, then open chords and let them ring out. After that I turn the guitar volume down to get some cleaner sound and play a few chords that way. Finally, back to full volume, play some barre chords up the neck, and finally play a few higher notes on their own. That usually gets the refinement as close as possible. I have noticed that multiple refinements sometimes make the profile sound digital.
 

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Thanks for all the comments and added tips + suggestions. Glad you guys liked this. I was getting tired of the 20+ minutes of guys talking and saying nothing at all! Nobody has time for that. Lol.
 

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So the Kemper profile has a built in IR of the cab you used? I always thought You could use a Kemper profile as an amp run into a guitar cab. Is that like another technique taking the signal from a load box or something?
 

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So the Kemper profile has a built in IR of the cab you used? I always thought You could use a Kemper profile as an amp run into a guitar cab. Is that like another technique taking the signal from a load box or something?
There are 3 types of profiles.

Studio: Profiles the entire rig (preamp, power amp, and cabinet via one or more microphones )

Direct: Profiles the Pre and power amps, but not the cabinet, via a DI box.

Merged: This is made by using a direct profile, and matching it to a studio profile on the Kemper.

Studio profiles are usually used for recording, studio monitors and FRFRs. They can also be used with a cabinet, by turning off the cabinet in the profile.

DI profiles are mainly used for guitar cabinets, IR Loaders, etc.

Merged profiles are like studio profiles, but the cabinet separation is better represented, because the Kemper can see the Studio profile and the DI profile. The difference between the two gives an accurate representation of the cabinet. Studio profile make a estimation of what part is the cabinet. So, in theory, the merged should give better results when turning off the cabinet section in the completed profile.

HTH
 

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There are 3 types of profiles.

Studio: Profiles the entire rig (preamp, power amp, and cabinet via one or more microphones )

Direct: Profiles the Pre and power amps, but not the cabinet, via a DI box.

Merged: This is made by using a direct profile, and matching it to a studio profile on the Kemper.

Studio profiles are usually used for recording, studio monitors and FRFRs. They can also be used with a cabinet, by turning off the cabinet in the profile.

DI profiles are mainly used for guitar cabinets, IR Loaders, etc.

Merged profiles are like studio profiles, but the cabinet separation is better represented, because the Kemper can see the Studio profile and the DI profile. The difference between the two gives an accurate representation of the cabinet. Studio profile make a estimation of what part is the cabinet. So, in theory, the merged should give better results when turning off the cabinet section in the completed profile.

HTH
Great explanation!
 
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