Metal Guitarist Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Safe Spaces Advocate
Joined
·
3,125 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys -

Over the last couple years, I've gone through equipment like shit through a goose the day after taco Thursday. I'm sure part of it is a love of interesting, new stuff. Part of it, though, was hunting for a particular sound or tone. And, as a beginner, I often think the tone comes from gadgets.

As I've gotten better I've learned that a great deal of that tone comes from my hands and my instrument (get your damned minds out of the gutter.) Lately, I've gone to playing my DC through the Lone Star's drive channel with nothing more than a Boss RV-6 Reverb. That doesn't mean that's all I'll ever need, but I'm left thinking that some of my pedals are... well, superfluous.

I'm also considering creating another, smaller, pedal board - perhaps one overdrive, one reverb, and one fuzz. Jesus, I want to bust into "One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer" all of a sudden.

Should I dump the extra pedals or box them up and stick them on a shelf? My current board includes: Keeley Dyno My Roto, Keeley Oxblood, Keeley Red Dirt, Boss RV-6 Reverb, Catalinbread Katzenkönig Fuzz/Distortion, MXR Phase 90, MXR Carbon Copy.

 

·
Dream Crusher
Joined
·
21,053 Posts
If you need the money or want something else, sell. Otherwise, I'd keep, as this sort of thing is cyclical (especially if you have pedals you particularly like/are attached to).
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
Gear and instruments = Tone
Hands and fingers = Playing Style

Those two are separate things. The two things combined could be described as "sound"... Like, you know, when somebody hears a band and says "that band has a great sound" its a combination of all the band does.

There's "toneknobs" on amps and guitars, and there's "tonewood", and there's "vintage tone pickups" and etc etc.
Where's the "tonefingers"?

Even a pick/plectrum is part of GEAR. How it's used, is part of PLAYING STYLE.
So the pick itself has, because of shape and material, a certain tone.
But since different players use it in different ways, you could hear those differences. Not as tone. But as playing style.

It's very easy.

An awesome Ferrari car is still an awesome Ferrari car no matter if a seasoned race driver takes it for a effortless ride or the local drunk hick crashes it into a wall.
The car was still an awesome piece of gear. But they "played" it differently.
The same thing would apply if they both tried Al Bundys Dodge. The race driver would probably drive it pretty well (assuming it's actually running :flex:)
And the drunk hick would still crash it into a wall.
But the car would still be a piece of shit.

That's why you can see Satriani pick up some cheap guitar with cheap amp and say "look, he still sounds like Satriani!!!" well... YEAH. It's because you listen to playing style!

But why doesn't he just use that shitty amp in studio? Because it probably has shit tone.
 

·
Dream Crusher
Joined
·
21,053 Posts
Part of it is that you will tend to dial in whatever gear you have to fit what you like regardless, which means that you will tend to have "a sound" through a variety of different gear.

Also, your technique (how you strike the strings, what angle you hold the pick at, your muting, etc.) absolutely affects your tone.
 

·
Safe Spaces Advocate
Joined
·
3,125 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Still just playing style
I have to disagree with you, Rocka. Because I do a lot of bends, hammers, pull-offs, and slides, (I've been on this heavy blues kick lately) I notice a change in tone based up HOW I do those things.

I understand your point - you're saying tone comes from gear and your hands create only style. But I can perform essentially the same bend twice and get a completely different tone out of it the second time.

I respect your opinion, I really do, especially since you're such a killer player. We just disagree on this. :lol:

By the way, thanks for the input everyone.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
I have to disagree with you, Rocka. Because I do a lot of bends, hammers, pull-offs, and slides, (I've been on this heavy blues kick lately) I notice a change in tone based up HOW I do those things.

I understand your point - you're saying tone comes from gear and your hands create only style. But I can perform essentially the same bend twice and get a completely different tone out of it the second time.
Bending, fretting, bla bla all playing style too :)
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
1 Posts
I would hang on to any of the ones you are not using now.. Who knows what tomorrow will bring and you may want them again.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,062 Posts
If you need the money or want something else, sell. Otherwise, I'd keep, as this sort of thing is cyclical (especially if you have pedals you particularly like/are attached to).
I tend to agree with this. I'm also going though a phase were effects beyond reverb aren't doing that much for me, but there are times when I really miss them for just that *one* part. Might be worth boxing them up and writing shit without them, then if you miss them use them.
 

·
Is Actually Recording
Joined
·
32,765 Posts
Still just playing style
I gotta disagree here too. Something as simple as the way you hold your pick, the angle you hold it at, how tightly you hold it, how hard you hit, where on the string your hand tends to fall, etc can make significant changes in how your picking sounds, while similarly I can absolutely here a difference in my own playing between fretting with my very fingertips vs fretting with the fleshier part of the finger. And, while I get the argument that since these things can be controlled to a certain extent they're technique, not tone, I think part of what your "default" physical approach happens to be DOES inform your tone. Differences in the default approach from one player to the next are a large part of what make them sound like themselves - I'm going to sound like me pretty much no matter what I plug into.

To your question - if you don't need the money, hold onto them for a while. A year down the road if you're still not using them, maybe then consider selling. And I'm definitely a guitar-into-amp guy, myself; I have a Tube Screamer clone I'll sometimes use and a delay in the loop for leads, but that's about it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,708 Posts
I gotta disagree here too. Something as simple as the way you hold your pick, the angle you hold it at, how tightly you hold it, how hard you hit, where on the string your hand tends to fall, etc can make significant changes in how your picking sounds...
Absolutely. I play in a 2 guitar band, and while my other guitarist and I are both what I'd consider tight rhythm players, he hits the strings at an angle with his pick, whereas I hit the strings with the pick almost parallel. As a result we both sound very different.
 

·
Ear Punisher
Joined
·
858 Posts
I'm learning the same thing. Gone from a board full of pedals to a tuner, maybe chorus, delay, reverb, and a tube screamer (when the amps boost channel just isn't enough lol). Sometimes I just plug straight into the amp for simplicity too. Heck, I even found that I really don't even need a gate unless I'm recording something or playing some super high gain djenty crap at extreme volume. I however like to hang on to certain effects in case I decide my sound needs a certain color for a specific song. I agree tone is in the hands. You can add all the effects in the world and still sound like shit if you don't practice proper hand techniques imo.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
I gotta disagree here too. Something as simple as the way you hold your pick, the angle you hold it at, how tightly you hold it, how hard you hit, where on the string your hand tends to fall, etc can make significant changes in how your picking sounds, while similarly I can absolutely here a difference in my own playing between fretting with my very fingertips vs fretting with the fleshier part of the finger. And, while I get the argument that since these things can be controlled to a certain extent they're technique, not tone, I think part of what your "default" physical approach happens to be DOES inform your tone. Differences in the default approach from one player to the next are a large part of what make them sound like themselves - I'm going to sound like me pretty much no matter what I plug into.
I never said there's no difference, I'm not a complete moron :roll2:

A pick has a "tone", because it's gear.
The way you use it, is all up to playing style.
It doesn't change the tone itself.

If you change between 5 picking techniques, it's still just 5 different playing styles.
They sound different, but the tone in the amp and pick is still the same.

I never said different playing styles sounds different.

But tone is in gear
Playing style is in hands
Then you have a combined sound.
Which I DONT want to call "tone" because thats all in the gear

UNLESS you fingerpikc, like classic guitar.
Sure, the palm itself might affect tone but seriously, should we really lower the bar to "tone palms"? I dont think it's necessary. Too much shit going on with most of tone comes from:
1. Cab and mic placement
2. Amp
3. Pickup
4. Then all the rest like bridge, guitar, etc etc. NOT playing style. Thats a separate thing.

If somebody has longer fingers and play further up the string than a guy with short fingers, it's still just playing style, not tone.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
Thats why I re-recorded an entire album from scratch recently.

I first recorded it with EMG 60 in the bridge, which at the time I thought was cool.
Then I tried re-recording one of the riffs with Irongear Steam Hammer and I was like FUCK and just re-recorded the entire album.

Because I thought the Irongear had better tone than the EMG 60.

MY PLAYING STYLE WAS THE SAME.

But I got a better tone from another set of gear.

Thats part of my point
 

·
Guitarded
Rig: Marshall DSL20
Joined
·
429 Posts
compressor, OD, modulation and time. pick one of each. I get most of my distortion from my metal muff clone so I use that and a small amount of chorus. a compressor evens my tone out and then I've been just using the amp's reverb lately. I have a delay running too but its on a really short time and repeat. It's more of a thing to make my notes sound more present.

I'd say keep your old pedals around unless they're junk pedals that just sound like crap. You might want them again for some other project you join or start up.
 

·
OldSchool Blacksmith
Joined
·
2,866 Posts
If you need the money or want something else, sell. Otherwise, I'd keep, as this sort of thing is cyclical (especially if you have pedals you particularly like/are attached to).
:hesright:

An awesome Ferrari car is still an awesome Ferrari car no matter if a seasoned race driver takes it for a effortless ride or the local drunk hick crashes it into a wall.
The car was still an awesome piece of gear. But they "played" it differently.
The same thing would apply if they both tried Al Bundys Dodge. The race driver would probably drive it pretty well (assuming it's actually running :flex:)
And the drunk hick would still crash it into a wall.
But the car would still be a piece of shit.

That's why you can see Satriani pick up some cheap guitar with cheap amp and say "look, he still sounds like Satriani!!!" well... YEAH. It's because you listen to playing style!

But why doesn't he just use that shitty amp in studio? Because it probably has shit tone.
Love that analogy.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top