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Love it. Though to be fair, it should be Microsoft paying for all the extra coding and troubleshooting required by IE7, not the end user.
In keeping with fairness, a lot of the problem is not coming from Microsoft. Remember, this is the company that always wants everyone to upgrade to the newest thing as soon as it comes out, which is why patching a Windows machine will always inundate you with "upgrade to IE9 now!) dialog boxes. The truth of the matter is that big, slow moving entities--most specifically, the federal government and financial institutions--bought into Microsoft hook, line, and sinker back in the 90s, when they finally started the move off mainframes and token ring to PCs and Ethernet. These are the people who specifically coded for a certain browser, and have been stuck upgrading legacy code.

I'm a federal employee, working for the Department of Labor, and I can tell you that next year will be the role out to Windows 7. From Windows XP. Just let that sink in: Windows XP is eleven years old, and the desktop group has just now got the go ahead to move to Windows 7 (thank fucking god they're skipping Vista).

My previous employer ran an online auction/exchange for energy futures, and we had two workstations running Windows XP and IE6. They had to be XP, since IE6 doesn't run on Vista. We had a big sign on them to remind people to click "no" whenever Windows Update popped up a dialog box; not just to keep them from upgrading to IE7 or IE8, but to keep them from installing Service Pack 3, which broke IE6. My VP actually brought them from storage at his house, or we would have been on E-bay looking for these things: we not only needed an older version of XP (all the download's on Microsoft's site have SP3 and IE8 built in), but older hardware, since new hardware either doesn't run before SP3, or lacks drivers for XP entirely. All because many of our customers STILL had IE6 on their desktops, due to their internal applications requiring it.

Ultimately, I guess this is all Microsoft's fault, since they developed browsers that didn't meet HTML standards, and threw in all of their own special hooks. However, they ARE paying for it, on a daily basis, by being forced to drag out support on software that should have been dead long ago. I know that the federal government specially forced them to keep supporting XP on the desktop, now going on four years past when they initially wanted to EOL it. So, I guess there is a simple way to look at this if you are on that site, and get hit with that tax: if you are browsing at work, wait until you get home to buy, and if you are at home, for fuck's sake, upgrade already!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
One of my sites (for a hospital) still has 15% of visitors that use IE using IE7. they are getting a new site next year.

otherwise I dont support 7 any longer on any of the other 40+ websites I work on.


:noodles:
IE6 was really bad for the internet. Like Dave said tons and tons of companies used it because it was so hooked into the windows os it made making intranet aps a lot easier to do.

After the anti-trust lawsuit Microsoft had to break IE out of the windows os, then all of the hooks that used to work in IE 6 broke horribly.

So then it was either write all new code that would work in all browsers (for a lot more $$) or keep using the old shit that works.
 

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One of my sites (for a hospital) still has 15% of visitors that use IE using IE7. they are getting a new site next year.
I was going to add health care providers to the "scold list", along with the federal government and financial institutions. Then, I remembered that most hospitals are so far back in the IT stone ages that they still have paper medical records and green or orange screen mainframes. Four years back, I interviewed for a company that was going to transition Fairfax Hospital from IBM mainframes and OS/2, running on token ring. One of the holdups? They'd have to transition from the dot matrix printers that you can't get drivers for, but they needed impact printers for the carbon paper medical records. Seriously, I cannot believe how far in the past that place is, and it is considered to have one of the best children's care units in the country.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
^ WOW

About 12 or so years ago - when I was back in school I got a job working for one of my teachers - Scanning medical records and storing them on disks. Place I worked at was huge and just filled with shelf upon shelf of boxed medical records. (Was mostly done when I started tho) Had records for a large (7 hospital) group going back a long way...

Basically you would get a big cardboard file storage box, count of like 250 sheets if double sided or 500 if single and put a giant clip on the stack and then later run them through a bulk high speed scanner that would convert them to searchable text via ocr as well as keep a tiff image of the file.

Job was boring as hell but we actually finished scanning everything (I got hired on near the end worked there like 6 months or so)

what really sucked is some boxes had records that were printed out on the old roll based (very wide) paper that were a bitch because you had to hand scan them on another machine.
 

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Daveposts = yes.

I can confirm that this is the same situation at Customs and Border Protection, and we are just beginning to creep into Windows 7 :lol:
 

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:lol: Why would someone still be using IE7 in 2012? :lol: It just boggles the mind.

I mean, Dave is completely right about the government and antequated institutions like hospitals (although, like Dave mentioned, most of those places seem to be even MORE antequated). But why would anyone at home still be using IE7? :lol:
 

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Wirelessly posted :)dio:)

Narren, you have been out of the states too long. Can't you picture a couple of old folks on their dusty old Pentium III, forwarding their tea party emails to all their friends and family? Those are the people on IE7.
 

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Wirelessly posted :)dio:)

Narren, you have been out of the states too long. Can't you picture a couple of old folks on their dusty old Pentium III, forwarding their tea party emails to all their friends and family? Those are the people on IE7.
I hadn't considered them. I never thought they even used computers. :ugh: Good point.
 
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