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I'd love to get some ideas from you guys on some of the features of Reaper you use that maybe you found by chance that have helped you record.

I'll start, for me it's tabbed projects. Being able to copy and paste tracks/FX chains/parent tracks from one song to another is great in helping me keep my mixes more consistent between songs. This morning for example, I'm recording some miked amp guitars, and I just copied the parent track and sub tracks from one project and pasted them in the other. Delete out the wave files from the second project, and I'm good to go to record my guitars. Minimal setup.

 

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Is Actually Recording
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*Solo in Front, and in particular the fact you can add a button to the main toolbar to toggle this on and off (there's even a ready-to-go button for it in the list of options). With it off, when you solo a track, you hear just the track. Engage it, and when you solo the track, you hear the whole mix, but with everything else down a preset volume (by default -18db). I find this super handy for honing in on something but still keeping context.
*not sure if this is Mac only or PC as well, but play/stop being controlled by the space bar. I never knew about that until last weekend, actually.
*controllable veloticy/timing sliders for "humanize" on midi. Humanizing drums with pretty-tight-but-not-100%-perfect timing and a bit more variation on velicity is awesome.
*midi tip - right clicking on the piano roll selects every single note played on that "key" of the piano roll. My dad actually showed me that, believe it or not. :lol:
*midi tip #2 - when you HAVE selected a bunch of notes, either by right clicking or selecting them with the mouse, if you go down to the velocity map, click on a space between notes, and then drag across your selected notes, this automatically changes their velocity to where the mouse crosses. SUPER fast way to, say, throw a little bit of rhythmic dynamic feel to a ride cymbol, program a cadenza (say, a snare building in intensity), or block out the dynamics on a fill.
*S to split. Obvious, but just in case.
*Ctl-M to insert section markers into a project. This is usually the first thing I do when recording - throw down a simple drum beat for timing, then go through the song, and marking out "intro," "verse 1," "prechorus," "verse 2" "prechorus 2," "chorus," "solo," etc. before I start tracking bass, just to make it easier to keep my place while recording, and make sure I don't realize after tracking bass and rhythms and half my lead that I forgot a section.
 

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Is Actually Recording
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Hey, the rest of my tips are good! :lol:
 

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Channel templates. I don't know how many people use these, but they're fantastic when I'm using Reaper for writing. Set up a template with a track for drum plug of choice, one for an in from the guitar, and one for a decent 'verb with the routing already configured.

It makes it very handy to use Reaper as a "scratch pad" for song ideas.
 
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