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HAWKS & FUCK SEC!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think there's a couple of us on here that use modelers as practice. I've been curious about a few things. 1) Do you dial up a tone that's exactly like your main amp? 2) Or do you get something that's close enough? 3) And then do you use the head your "emulating" to reamp your track? These questions is also applies to the ones that use modelers for scratch tracks when you are recording. Right now I've got a Formula Pre for my tones when I do my recording. When I get back to the states I plan on getting an amp (not sure if it'll be a V or Roadster/Triple) and like to hear as many thoughts on this as possible.

Thanks.
 

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Modelers have the great advantage of being very quiet, so they're nice for practicing in an apartment, or around roommates who are sleeping/studying/etc. That said, most amps can be dialed in to have a somewhat OK tone at low volume levels.

My advice: get a cheap digital device for quiet places, and sink the rest of your budget into a really nice full-on amp.
 

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:yesway:

I have a Vox AD15VT to practice with when I need to be quiet. Not too many models, but does a decent job for a 1x8 combo.
 

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HAWKS & FUCK SEC!
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That the issue that I had when I had an Axe Fx. I would always be tweaking and creating new patches or modifying my current patches. I've found I just prefer twisting the dials on amps. Another reason why I picked up a Formula Preamp. It's a Mark flavored preamp that I can get to go into Rectoish tones easy enough.
 

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NSLALP
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That the issue that I had when I had an Axe Fx. I would always be tweaking and creating new patches or modifying my current patches. I've found I just prefer twisting the dials on amps. Another reason why I picked up a Formula Preamp. It's a Mark flavored preamp that I can get to go into Rectoish tones easy enough.
I don't have any more desire to tweak my Snax patches while practicing than you likely do to twist knobs on your Formula Pre while practicing. I've got some good tones programmed for my band so I just fire my basic rhythm patch up, or a slightly wetter lead patch if I feel like wanking a bit, and have at!
 

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I'm a knob guy myself. Wait... :lol:

But yeah, I think the TriAxis is as close to a modeling system as I'd like to go, in terms of tweaking. I've actually strayed very little from Vince's original settings :vince:
 

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HAWKS & FUCK SEC!
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I don't have any more desire to tweak my Snax patches while practicing than you likely do to twist knobs on your Formula Pre while practicing. I've got some good tones programmed for my band so I just fire my basic rhythm patch up, or a slightly wetter lead patch if I feel like wanking a bit, and have at!
He he. You got a point. But for me...it just doesn't 'feel' right. :shrug:

Leon said:
I'm a knob guy myself. Wait...

But yeah, I think the TriAxis is as close to a modeling system as I'd like to go, in terms of tweaking. I've actually strayed very little from Vince's original settings
He he. That's why I wrote dials vice knobs. I guess we are both "knob" guys....wait a minute???
 

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I use a POD XT for practice and scratch tracks. I use the built in recto patch, and don't tweak it at all.

For real recording, I'll go back and record real tracks with an amp and a DI track for possible reamping later.
 

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I dislike Porcupine Tree.
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I use a V-Amp 2 for practicing right now (especially as it seems my preamp tubes are starting to go). My first set of patches is all super-dry, no effects or reverb at all for practicing: a nice clean with a tiny bit of crunch, a nice mid-gain, and a nice high-gain (no noise gate on any of these). Works great for me. :shrug:


edit: NICE
 

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Dream Crusher
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I find if I use a POD or (more recently) guitar plugins (ReValver sounds fantastic for high-gain sounds) and move away from the modeler, then I don't spend as much time tweaking. I tend to dial in a sound I like (which ends up sounding a lot like my real amp) and then just going with it.
 

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Given the fact that I record at home and will most likely never step foot into a recording studio (mostly because I refuse to pay someone to basically play with knobs when they have no vested interest in my music), I will probably never record through a real amp again. My opinion is that the ability to re-amp tracks on the fly with Modellers (regardless of the brand) is too valuable a tool. Does a tube amp feel more real? Yes. In the right situation will it trump a modeller? Yes. But my opinion is that I will never be in a situation where I will be able to take advantage of that. For most people, an amp modeller will get better results recording at home than a real amp.

Let's think about this for a second. You mic up a speaker on a cabinet for your guitar tones. I just don't agree with that ideology anymore. Distortion itself is manipulation of an audio signal. Why should recording a guitar signal be any different?
 

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Let's think about this for a second. You mic up a speaker on a cabinet for your guitar tones. I just don't agree with that ideology anymore. Distortion itself is manipulation of an audio signal. Why should recording a guitar signal be any different?
Because guitarists tend to be conservative with their tone, and want the same exact sound they hear when they jam to be in the recording. They like the sound of an amp+cab because it's what they've always heard, and it's what they are used to. If we were more sonically liberal, then we might still be recording with first generation digital systems. However, most guitarists refuse to let go of that amp+cab tone, so the digital world has had a lot of work to do to catch up to simulating that sound.
 

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Because guitarists tend to be conservative with their tone, and want the same exact sound they hear when they jam to be in the recording. They like the sound of an amp+cab because it's what they've always heard, and it's what they are used to. If we were more sonically liberal, then we might still be recording with first generation digital systems. However, most guitarists refuse to let go of that amp+cab tone, so the digital world has had a lot of work to do to catch up to simulating that sound.
It's a balancing act of pure tone vs. flexibility and ease of use. For now we have trade-offs in both areas.

Tube amps sound better, yes. But plugins and modelers have far more flexibility, and they're sure as hell easier to record.
 

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It's a balancing act of pure tone vs. flexibility and ease of use. For now we have trade-offs in both areas.

Tube amps sound better, yes. But plugins and modelers have far more flexibility, and they're sure as hell easier to record.
Absolutely. If you dig the tone from them, then recording will be easier.

...As will maintaining sane volume levels.

.......And your back will thank you :lol:
 

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Absolutely. If you dig the tone from them, then recording will be easier.

...As will maintaining sane volume levels.

.......And your back will thank you :lol:
It's really the issue I'm running into right now. I jam, I record. No real band. Yet I have a tube amp that's too loud. I am struggling to find a solution to record silently, which will easily run way more, and still possibly not sound good.

It makes me wonder if it's all worth it.
 
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