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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i finished programming the drums for my next attempt at recording one of my songs on Saturday so yesterday i mic'd up my cab and had a go at recording without isolating the cab, it was much harder to get the mic position and eq right to get a good sound but eventually i got there.

i ended up recording 4 tracks individually and then panning them 2 each side (1 40% and 1 70%)

on the rare occasion my playing was actually tight it sounded huge but im wondering if i am wasting time recording 4 seperate tracks?

is this the generally accepted method or can i just focus on 1 really well played track and then copy it 3 times? i would have thought this would create wierd phasey sound problems?
 

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Retarded P.A Overlord.
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It would just make that one take louder sir. Wouldn't add much, if anything other than volume to the guitars.
 

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i am the owl
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Wirelessly posted

Don't copy/paste, you have to record separate takes perfectly. I'd start with 2 tracks panned 100% L/R personally. That, played perfectly, will sound very tight and huge. Generally if I am doing 2 per side and panning them at different values, I switch the "inner" 2 up ( different mic, guitar, turning the TS off, etc),and even then I still pan the outer two hard at 100% as my main sound. But I rarely do that. :2cents:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
cool, as i say thats what i did yesterday but it does really show up the inconsistencys in your playing - time to get better!
 

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Control The Sun
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Yeah, never copy/ paste. The reason double or quad tracked guitars sound big is because they are two fundamentally different performances that down to the most minute level are not the same. An exact duplicate of the waveform will give you a bad sound.

Panning, usually people say 100% L/R for two, and then 100% L/R and 80%-75% L/R for four. However, to fill out the mix a little more, I will do two tracks at 80% L/R. It works well I think. Whatever benefits the mix most.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
tbh it sounded good with the 70-40 way i had it.

i just wanted to make sure i wasnt just wasting my time but i did suspect that multiple takes was the correct way to do it (which is why i spent 4 hrs doing it.....)

cheers for the help
 

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All those saying C&P does nothing are correct. Moving C&Ps round the stereo field just moves the apparent location of 1 guitar.

You need multiple performances. Its the fact that they are always slightly different and dont actually perfectly stack that allows them to separate out across the stereo field, which is vital to a big metal guitar sound.

As to two tracks or 4 or whatever, there are 3 main (note MAIN, there are lots of layering methods) ways of stacking up the guitars:

Double. Two takes at 100% L and R
More aggressive and raw sounding. Allows greater clarity. Might be a bit thinner than you'd like

Quad. 4 takes in two pairs: 1a:100L 2a:(-~80L, -3 to -6db) 2b:(-~80R, -3 to -6db) 1b:100R
Thicker, more massive sound, might lack clarity or be a bit 'airy'.

Triple. 100L, C -~6db, 100R
Wall of guitar vibe, helps gell with bass, but also gets in the way of stuff in your centre (kick, snare, vocals).

Note all of the methods have 1 guitar at 100L and 100R. Thats pretty much the cornerstone of it. If youre moving much further in than there, then it clouds the guitars, makes them sounds smaller and makes them get in the way of everything else even more than they normally do :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
cheers for this, i want the wall of guitar sound so im going to try out your 3 each side method
 

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Just to throw a potentially unnecessary tuppence in there, I'd definitely recommend going for a wider spread than 70% and 40% - if I'm quad-tracking guitars I don't think I ever go more central than 70% for the 'inner' tracks. You'll have a hell of a time getting any decent degree of separation in the mix otherwise!
 

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Control The Sun
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40% seems too close. The bass, kick drum, snare, and vocals wont have a lot of breathing room.
 

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Reverend Secret Flower
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I always do at least a pair of takes 1 panned 100% Left and 1 panned 100% Right

If i'm doing tech metal type stuff, i'l usually just do 1 per side. If i'm going for a thicker sound in slower song with more grain and texture, i'l start putting takes more in the center.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
cheers all I recon the fact I have no vocals or bass in the mix is clouding my panning judgement!
 
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