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Bah. I still suck.
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Ok, this won't be anyone's idea of a rack but it's pretty much what I wanted to pull together and so far I'm happy with it. About a month ago, a Digitech GSP-21 Legend popped up in my Reverb feed for $50. The guy stated that it has a few issues (scratchy pots & footswitches not engaging) but the price was too good to pass up on a piece of gear I've wanted since the 90s. The scratchy pots were cleaned up easily with a healthy dose of contact cleaner and the floor switch actually works intermittently.
I was already working on the innards so I also took the opportunity to replace what looked like the original battery and upgraded the EPROM to the latest version using the kit available on eBay. It's turned out to be a cool score, even if I eventually end up having to replace the switches in the foot switch (those run about $20). I think I actually like the patches in the GSP-21 more than those in the GSP-2101.





So the GSP-21 now joined a GSP-2101 Artist Edition that I bought several years ago. I played with it a little bit back when I originally got it but I turned to VSTs due to the ease of use (and space). The pandemic has forced me to switch over to Zoom lessons with my instructor. Every lesson, I have to drag my amp into another room and set up. I eventually thought about getting a wheeled rack enclosure that I could put these GSPs inside and also keep my small amp inside it. As luck would have it, a local Reverb listing had a decent sized enclosure for $75 so I snatched it up. The enclosure was pretty close to ideal for what I had in mind. It was too deep for my needs at 30" but I was able to cut it down to 21" with some careful measurements and a circular saw. I also swapped out the 5" wheels it had for some 2" wheels to bring the height down. After all the retrofitting, my next step was to build a small riser for inside the enclosure so I could store the two GSP foot switches underneath the amp.





In the meantime, I tracked down a Furman PL-8C to serve as the power supply for everything in the rack. It wasn't until after building the riser and trying to fit everything inside that I realized I didn't have as much room for everything as I had thought. My Roland Cube 80XL did fit inside the enclosure but was too tall, especially if I wanted to keep using the riser *and* keep a rack drawer inside. Something had to change and I decided it was the amp.

The 80XL is a great amp but, as I look back on the years that I have owned it, I haven't really used any of the features that originally pushed me to buy it- the built-in looper, 80-watts, etc. I knew that a replacement amp had to be smaller and less watts and I gave some serious consideration to Positive Grid's Spark amp since I already have the Bias plug-ins and a familiarity with their ecosystem. I was almost set to pull the trigger when I remembered a message a buddy had sent me back around Christmas where he had told me that he was buying a Roland JC-22 for his son.

The size was right (still fit inside the enclosure and shorter than the Cube), it had an FX loop, stereo inputs, and 30-watts. I shot him a message to see how it was going with the JC-22 and he was all positive about it. After watching a few videos about them, I decided that was the amp to pick up. The JC-22 isn't cheap- it's almost twice the price of the Positive Grid Spark. None the less, the JC legacy is hard to ignore and my Cube (made by Roland) had been great.

One of the local guitar shops here in the Seattle area stocks the JC-22 and also buys used gear. I sent them some pictures of my Cube amp as well as an Ibanez AG-85 hollow body that I've been meaning to get rid of for years. They offered me $100 for the cube (I bought it used for $150) and $200 for the guitar (I bought used for $300) and that was good enough for me. I picked up my JC-22 today and finished putting everything together. So far, so good! I picked up a 50-pack of these cable clips to try and do some cleaner cable management on the back side of the enclosure.





The last piece that I purchased was one of these cheap wireless systems off of Amazon. I'm literally just a bedroom musician so there's no need to buy a more expensive system. Both receiver and transmitter charge via USB and I haven't noticed and latency issues (they advertise it as 5.6ms). Yay me.
 

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Premium Member
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23,428 Posts
Man that is fucking cool as hell :wub:




As for that dodgy footswitch, I'm sure you could rehouse the guts into a better enclosure, and use some momentary switches instead of those weird plastic things.
 

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OldSchool Blacksmith
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2,866 Posts
That's really cool. Love the resourcefulness to get where you wanted to go. Dig the portability, too. :yesway:
 

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Premium Member
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282 Posts
Sweet set up man! Well done! I love the old Digitech rack stuff, I've still got a 2120 Artist from back in the day and it still holds it's own:metal:
 

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Forum MVP
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4,767 Posts
Very nice. The foot pedal/bourd gave me flashbacks lol I think I had most of the rack units out back then... the MP-1, a ART rack, The Legend, but the foot control with the legend used to make people at the jam house think it was badass by proxy lol
 
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