Metal Guitarist Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Pallin' around
Joined
·
9,532 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So just because you don't play live with a guitar doesn't mean that you shouldn't have straplocks. Lesson learned. Guitar go boom.

Anyway, time to say goodbye to that royal blue color and do something unique!!!

Also added 5 way DiMarzio multi pole switch and CrunchLab/Liquifire.

I think itsa alright!








And of course, new straplocks ;)

~Sean
 

·
Pallin' around
Joined
·
9,532 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Looks awesome man, what did you use to seal it afterwards?
I just used a few cans (5 I think) of lacquer clear coat. It worked pretty good! In a few years I think I might get a veneer and start it over!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,388 Posts
Very cool! :yesway:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,930 Posts
So just because you don't play live with a guitar doesn't mean that you shouldn't have straplocks. Lesson learned. Guitar go boom.

Anyway, time to say goodbye to that royal blue color and do something unique!!!

Also added 5 way DiMarzio multi pole switch and CrunchLab/Liquifire.

I think itsa alright!








And of course, new straplocks ;)

~Sean
oh, and btw :leghump: all over that guitar
 

·
Pallin' around
Joined
·
9,532 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I really like it. There's more grain than you'd expect from basswood. How did you do it?
The first step is to drop the guitar with the original finish on tile, to give you motivation :lol:

I wanted to get a distressed look, so here is what I did to try to do that.

1) Sand down the guitar. This took forever. FOREVER. I would recommend using paint stripping chemicals instead, unless you have about 40 hours and a crap ton of sandpaper. Note that you must sand through 4 layers! Clear, color, primer, and SEALER. Those light streaks in the finish on the front, and dark spot in the back are from me not going through the sealer. You can't really see it while you are sanding so it is kinda tough. I think those streaks actually turned out looking pretty sweet for my distressed idea! Remember to sand from coarse to smooth. The smoother your base, the better your color will take.

2) I used a black, water based wood stain on this. Once it is sanded, you need to clean the hell out of it so that there is ZERO grease. That means you should wear gloves so you don't get fingerprints on it either.

Then I used a rag to apply the stain. Essentially just dipped it in the stain and worked an even coat into the wood. To get the distressed features I waited until it was about dry, and then took a clean rag and tried to remove some of the stain in certain spots. I repeated this 4 times to get it darker.

3) I then used a spray can gloss lacquer to do the clear coats. The trick is letting it dry, but not cure between coats. If it cures, then an additional coat does not blend in, because the lacquer has solidified. So, per can instructions, wait at least 4 hours, and no more than 12 between coats. I sprayed 8 coats (5 cans worth).

4) More sanding. I worked from about 320grit dry sanding to 2000grit wet sanding. This takes a while, and some good attention to detail. After this, I took car finish polish (course and fine) and polished it with a rag, course first, and then fine.

I took a while but I am glad I did it!
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top