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:wub:

Hell yeah man! Curious to know how your daughter takes to it. I plan to put one in my living room as well with the hopes that one/both of my sons will take an interest in it.

Does it have any kind of MIDI in it? If so, the lessons built into Garage Band are worth a look.
 

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Hates Richie Kotzen
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Now... who knows how to play one of these?
Sick keyboard, I have a Kawai. Cool stuff.

It's a lot simpler than it looks. You have to learn music theory at the same time. You can't really learn them separately. Piano and music theory are essentially the same thing.

The white keys are C Major, which is relative to A minor which is relative to E Phrygian. Just get a poster of the circle of fifths. Don't touch any of the black keys yet if you are just starting. Those are the accidentals.

Western harmony is tertiary, which means it's based on thirds. That means you just take and scale, pick a degree (note), and skip a degree to find the next note in the chord, skip another to find the next note. etc.

For example, in the key of a minor, here is how you would build a chord off of the tonic, which is the term for the first scale degree. All the notes in the scale are on the white keys played sequentially. Start on A and go to the next A. No black keys. That's A minor. Start on E and go to the next E, that's E Phrygian, etc. etc. etc.



The theory behind it isn't difficult, and I can play some decent stuff concentrating on one hand at a time. The hard part for anyone coming from guitar is separating your hands. It's a dual voiced instrument. Your left hand and your right hand are two different voices acting independently of one another.

Usually for beginners, and in fact on a great deal of piano music in general, the left hand does chords on the lower pitched side and the right hand does the melody on the higher pitched notes. It' by no means a rule, but generally speaking the left hand provides a chordal harmonic framework and the right is melodic.

If you've never done keys before don't even touch the black keys for a good two weeks-month if this is your first time giving learning piano/keys a serious go.
 

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Hates Richie Kotzen
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Get a poster of the circle of fifths and being good at your enharmonic equivalencies and relativity between chords and keys is a must BTW, can't skip it. Later on you get into stuff like voicings that use inversions, and if you don't know that you are fucked.

Traditionally speaking, minor tonality is denoted by lower case letters and Major tonality is denoted by upper case, but in the age of hoverscooters and vr headsets and texting we live in, it's not as imperative of a convention as it once was.

I type "A Minor", because "a minor" looks like you are referring to an underaged person in modern text based communications. It's not technically correct, but those are rules from a different era.
 

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You could do what Garrett said, or you could learn Home Sweet Home, Jump and the Beverly Hills Cop theme.

Up to you really but I know which way I'd go.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
:wub:

Hell yeah man! Curious to know how your daughter takes to it. I plan to put one in my living room as well with the hopes that one/both of my sons will take an interest in it.

Does it have any kind of MIDI in it? If so, the lessons built into Garage Band are worth a look.
At 2.5 she's quite happy to bang on the keys. When I turn the volume down, she says, "Boke?" :lol:

Yeah, it' has MIDI in's and outs, and bluetooth midi. So far I have an app that allows me to easily flip through the tones. I think there are teaching apps where I can put a keyboard on the screen that shows my keystrokes, but I haven't gotten there yet.

Sick keyboard, I have a Kawai. Cool stuff.

It's a lot simpler than it looks. You have to learn music theory at the same time. You can't really learn them separately. Piano and music theory are essentially the same thing.

The white keys are C Major, which is relative to A minor which is relative to E Phrygian. Just get a poster of the circle of fifths. Don't touch any of the black keys yet if you are just starting. Those are the accidentals.

Western harmony is tertiary, which means it's based on thirds. That means you just take and scale, pick a degree (note), and skip a degree to find the next note in the chord, skip another to find the next note. etc.

For example, in the key of a minor, here is how you would build a chord off of the tonic, which is the term for the first scale degree. All the notes in the scale are on the white keys played sequentially. Start on A and go to the next A. No black keys. That's A minor. Start on E and go to the next E, that's E Phrygian, etc. etc. etc.



The theory behind it isn't difficult, and I can play some decent stuff concentrating on one hand at a time. The hard part for anyone coming from guitar is separating your hands. It's a dual voiced instrument. Your left hand and your right hand are two different voices acting independently of one another.

Usually for beginners, and in fact on a great deal of piano music in general, the left hand does chords on the lower pitched side and the right hand does the melody on the higher pitched notes. It' by no means a rule, but generally speaking the left hand provides a chordal harmonic framework and the right is melodic.

If you've never done keys before don't even touch the black keys for a good two weeks-month if this is your first time giving learning piano/keys a serious go.
Earlier this morning I was playing, trying to find my C's and E's. Keying Cmaj, Cm, Emaj, Em, and just finding them around the board. All the theory my guitar teacher (Mike Martin) has been squeezing into me (osmosis mostly :lol:) is paying off... I think... :lol:

But yeah, the tone of this thing is pretty awesome! Granted, it also has great reviews for it's key action, but having never really spent time on a real piano, I couldn't tell. Feels "real" enough to me.
 

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OldSchool Blacksmith
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The keyboard is cool the kid pix are priceless. :wub:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You could do what Garrett said, or you could learn Home Sweet Home, Jump and the Beverly Hills Cop theme.

Up to you really but I know which way I'd go.
If I were forced to set a goal of learning a song, it'd be this:

 

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The keyboard is cool the kid pix are priceless. :wub:
She likes to sit next to me and hit keys while I'm finding my chords :lol:
 

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OldSchool Blacksmith
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She likes to sit next to me and hit keys while I'm finding my chords :lol:
Ha. Nice. My son uses ours strictly for the sound effects (it has gunshots, "farts", alien sounds, etc in it).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Ha. Nice. My son uses ours strictly for the sound effects (it has gunshots, "farts", alien sounds, etc in it).
Clearly I bought the wrong one! :lol:

This has bluetooth midi (and wired midi)... I should find an app for triggers...

Actually, I've found just the native app for it; Sound Museum. It lets me easily change sounds. But, I know there are other general apps that will likely work with this, but I haven't spent much time looking yet.
 

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My wife is actually looking for a good book. Do you know of another one that doesn't have a guitarist lean?
I bought my daughter the regular Hal Leonard Keyboard Book 1, and she's been doing fine with it so far.
 

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In some ways, grabbing the basic stuff on piano is easier than guitar, since it's all laid out in front you in the proper order. In fact, you may find that the theory you've been learning on guitar is much more intuitive on piano.

The hardest part for me is synchronizing left and right hand parts, and I've been playing keys (sort of) for decades--not properly, just enough to record basic parts and write with.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I totally notice that... All the 2nd's and 4th's and such... I understand them on guitar, but it's just right there in numerical order on the keyboard :lol:

So far, I'm getting pretty OK at doing a bass note with the left hand and a major or minor triad with the right. If I need to hit a 7th chord, the left hand just hangs in space :lol:
 
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