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NSLALP
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'd mentioned earlier that there was this dude I'd talked to about recording my band's EP/demo/whatever, presumably some time this year. He has a full Pro Tools setup and he is pretty proud of his 2" tape system as well, and his studio was very impressive looking. Blinky lights, space and room treatments galore.

Come to find out, he's quite humble about it, but not only does he have several hundred records under his belt, he's also been nominated for Grammys multiple times; this includes 2011, for recording Joey Defrancesco's "Never Can Say Goodbye," which is up for Best Contemporary Jazz Album. He's done many styles, including jazz, blues, punk, rock, orchestral, acoustic/folk, and even specializes in field recordings of events and performances. Seems like a hell of a guy to boot.

All that being said, I've got a reasonably close connection to the guy and though we haven't talked prices, he made it sounds like he'd be very flexible and would offer us project pricing (vs. hourly). But... he's never done metal to the best of my knowledge.

Is that important? We're not Killswitch Engage or Necrophagist here, more of a radio-friendly style. Is it better to work with a man who simply knows SOUND, or should he be well-versed in the sound we THINK we're looking for? I suspect he'll be moderately annoyed if we start telling him how to record us, outside of offering him some demos of our target sound.

How much of the final sound is mastering, anyway? He offers full mastering services as well, but perhaps it would be wise to go with a guy like this for recording but put the raw tracks in the hands of someone experienced with mastering metal?

Discuss.
 

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...
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18,790 Posts
While it can be important to have a producer who understands your sound, you can also end up with very interesting results working with a producer who's not 100% familiar with your style, but knows his shit technically, and has an open mind.

I mean, hell, I don't think Stephen Wilson had ever recorded anything particularly heavy before Blackwater Park ;)

In the end, if he's done modern rock, punk, orchestral, folk, and jazz, IMHO, throw that in a blender, and that's metal. :lol: The rock and punk will give him an understanding of the energy and sonics of a loud, live band, the jazz will give him an understanding of odd song structures and highly capable musicians, and the orchestral experience means he can handle extremes in dynamics and frequency range.

Metal is very different from recording a lot of other stuff. Especially distorted guitars :ugh:

Slipperman's Recording Distorted Guitars From Hell
You know, I've never read that, but I personally disagree that there's anything fundamentally different about recording metal guitars versus any other aggressive rock that doesn't take place in the techniques and gear of the guitarist, not the producer. Mic, processing and mixing techniques are essentially the same as modern rock and punk.

I mean, these were all recorded by the same guy, using essentially the same techniques.


And by same techniques, I don't mean identical mic placements and compression/EQ settings, I mean the same approach: to use your ears and your knowledge of what gear does what when used what way to best capture the sound.
 

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Dream Crusher
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If he's done pop, he can polish turds. Don't worry about it :wub:
 

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Super Moderator
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4,876 Posts
what i would do with someone like this is bring in a few cds you love the production on and see what his reaction is. feel it out with him. while distorted guitars can be a pain, if the dude knows how to mic a guitar amp, you'll be fine.
 

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Tr00 Kvlt
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5,914 Posts
what i would do with someone like this is bring in a few cds you love the production on and see what his reaction is. feel it out with him. while distorted guitars can be a pain, if the dude knows how to mic a guitar amp, you'll be fine.
This. Give him some examples of productions you really like but also realize that it is actually a smart move to bring in someone with a fresh ear with not much time in your particular genre...unless its Bob Rock. :rofl: Especially since you said you're going for a more radio friendly sound, and you're not KSE etc. Bringing someone with a fresh ear will more times than not be a very wise decision. :yesway:
 

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Read Only
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3 Posts
A good engineer is a good engineer. Will he know the ins and outs of metal like Sneap or Kernon, probably not? Does that matter for the EP of an unsigned local band, absolutely not!

If you all don't have much recording experience, working with a seasoned engineer will be a great help, as he will be able to guide you through the process.

Generally speaking project pricing will mean that you'll pay a little less because you're going to commit to a larger chunk of time. His normal hourly rate is $75, so don't expect it to work out to $25 if you do a project, but you might get 20 hours for $1200.

Also, DO NOT have the same person that mixed your album master it. It's a bad idea.
 
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