Metal Guitarist Forums banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Jackson DKMG with satin black finish, is now only part satin and a lot of fingergrease black finish.

It was my main live guitar for about 4 years and to be honest I didn't always take the time to properly wipe it clean after sweating all over it.

So now some parts are looking shiny, especially around the pots, pickups and bridge.

Is it possible to get the satin look back, or will I need to sand it down, paint it again and get the sating finish on it.

I've read about grease removal products, but it doesn't seem the wisest of choices.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks for the info.

I'm guessing that the sanding will have to be done with a very high grit; somewhere in the range of P320 - P600 ?

Edit:
I'll have to sand the whole thing to make sure the finish is equally satin-y across the whole body.

Any tips to avoid over-sanding and ruining it all are more than welcome.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
Well, I guess this is the curse of satin finishes :lol:

My 2 different satin Warmoth necks has been glossed up almost completely, one of them with maple fretboard that's really shiny in the areas I play the most.

If you like the look of satins, that's cool. But they are pretty much doomed to get glossed up after time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was afraid that might be the case, full gloss it is then.
At least I'll get to practice my polishing skills.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,213 Posts
Thanks for the info.

I'm guessing that the sanding will have to be done with a very high grit; somewhere in the range of P320 - P600 ?

Edit:
I'll have to sand the whole thing to make sure the finish is equally satin-y across the whole body.

Any tips to avoid over-sanding and ruining it all are more than welcome.
My tip would be take a look at some of Rocka's other thereads before listening to anything he has to say about guitar maintenance/repair.

I would not be putting sand paper anywhere near your guitar. Take it to a tech who can deal with guitar finishes. I suspect there will be nothing you can do about the shine. Its pretty well known that a lot of matt finishes (especially cheaper ones) will gloss up as a result of your hand resting on the body.
 

·
Resident Winger Overlord
Joined
·
4,287 Posts
Use some 0000 grade steel wool lightly in a circular fashion.

You will never get it back to factory satin exactly, but that's as close as you'll get.

Also, satin clear is just regular clear with additive to dull the finish, and not how rocka describes it.
Yeah be careful where you take your advice here.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
Use some 0000 grade steel wool lightly in a circular fashion.

You will never get it back to factory satin exactly, but that's as close as you'll get.

Also, satin clear is just regular clear with additive to dull the finish, and not how rocka describes it.
Yeah be careful where you take your advice here.
Sorry, I had it the wrong way around. I was sure the glossy finish had "glossy ingridents"

Apparently not!

This is a perfect example of just assuming things, and I'm not any different from any other.

However, don't act like I'm the only one assuming here, I know thats what your trying to get at.

At least I admit I'm wrong unlike othe guys on this forum
 

·
Safe Spaces Advocate
Joined
·
3,125 Posts
This is more-or-less what satin finishes do over time. The quality of the finish often will determine the amount of time it takes.

Elbows, fingers resting on the body, etc., will all shine a satin finish.

I recommend against the sandpaper. Dana is an experienced paint guy and if you're not sure about it all, +1 for Nick's suggestion to take it to a luthier or tech.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
835 Posts
Satin finishes lacks the ingredient that make glossy finishes glossy tho.
It will be "glossy", but not glossy, like regular guitars.
It works the other way around. They add 10-20% of matting agent to matte clear coats. The paint then has a seizure and dries matte.

Regular clear coats just dry with orange peel in them, exactly the same as paint from a rattlecan, and then they sand them flat and buff them out. Anything hard enough can be buffed to a shiny finish, because shininess is a result of flatness, not of material properties. For example, if you burnish a piece of wood long enough it will become shiny.

Your local auto body shop is more than qualified to buff a bolt-on guitar flat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
if you do this, for the love of god cover your pickups with masking tape, so the fine metal-filings don't get stuck to the magnets.
Don't worry. Whenever I do any body work, the pickups come out first.

Just leave it.
If I were to keep it, I'd just let it be.
It's going up for sale , so I'm gonna try to make it look good.
A filthy looking stained guitar isn't much of a price booster.

I got some friends with more experience in this type of work to help me out if I screw up.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
It works the other way around. They add 10-20% of matting agent to matte clear coats. The paint then has a seizure and dries matte.

Regular clear coats just dry with orange peel in them, exactly the same as paint from a rattlecan, and then they sand them flat and buff them out. Anything hard enough can be buffed to a shiny finish, because shininess is a result of flatness, not of material properties. For example, if you burnish a piece of wood long enough it will become shiny.

Your local auto body shop is more than qualified to buff a bolt-on guitar flat.
YESS!!!!! I KNOW!!!!

I pointed that out if you just read one more post man

Fuck!!!!

I had it the wrong way around, so fucking what. I admitted I was wrong! I had it the wrnog way around!!! FUCK!!!!

I can admit I'm wrong !!!
 

·
Guiterrorizer
Joined
·
15,696 Posts
You probably wont get whatever money you spend restoring it back from the sale. Just leave it.
 

·
Safe Spaces Advocate
Joined
·
3,125 Posts
You probably wont get whatever money you spend restoring it back from the sale. Just leave it.
I agree. I didn't know you were selling it.

People who are buying used satin guitars expect a certain amount of this. I'd clean it up and leave the shiny spots as they are. Good luck with the sale.
 

·
Bro of Bros, Bro.
Joined
·
15,373 Posts
Use some 0000 grade steel wool lightly in a circular fashion.

You will never get it back to factory satin exactly, but that's as close as you'll get.

Also, satin clear is just regular clear with additive to dull the finish, and not how rocka describes it.
Yeah be careful where you take your advice here.
Why should we take your word for it? Can you back this claim up with science?
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top