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Is Actually Recording
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is the only OFR guitar I own so I'm afraid I can't really compare to somerhing to tell if this is normal, but is it typical yo have a little bit of play in the studs in an OFR? I'm 99% sure it's the studs themselves and not the anchors, which seem pretty rock-solid, and it's just that I can shift the studs themselves back and forth in the anchors. I'mm thinking of just hitting them with some Lock-tite to tighten up the fit, but I figured I'd ask here before doing anything.

You don't notice it while playing, but it's enough that you can feel it in the bar when you grab the bar, and this guitar has never fluttered terribly well for it. Thanks!

EDIT - the video I posted at the bottom of the first page, that everyone seems to have missed. :lol:

 

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As long as its not the anchors you can buy new studs. I have seen that with no tention on the strings during string changes but not once tuned up. I know Gotoh has locking studs to eliminate that play between anchor and studs, which is very cool.

Didnt Suhr switch to Gotoh a few years back for QC reasons? Something about having to prep-fix the OFRs too much to rely on for production.
 

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Mutes the Meat
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As long as its not the anchors you can buy new studs. I have seen that with no tention on the strings during string changes but not once tuned up. I know Gotoh has locking studs to eliminate that play between anchor and studs, which is very cool.

Didnt Suhr switch to Gotoh a few years back for QC reasons? Something about having to prep-fix the OFRs too much to rely on for production.
That is interesting. I've been planning on buying a couple OFRs myself to replace some crappy and old licensed ones. Should I be looking at Gotoh instead?
 

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This is normal

And it doesn't matter that much.

Remember when you had the strings on and tuned up, you have a LOOOOT of force so they wont be wiggling around anyway.


But the GOTOH studs are better anyway because they have an internal screw that locks it into place and and wont be wiggling around no matter what.
Even then I recommend screwing the locking mechanicanism when having the strings tensioned so its in the "correct place" when locked.
 

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That is interesting. I've been planning on buying a couple OFRs myself to replace some crappy and old licensed ones. Should I be looking at Gotoh instead?
Well, I like that they are lo-profile, already come with the brass block and you can choose how big you want, are smoother on the hand, very well made in Japan, dont use that screw coller I hate- have a push in arm. To me anyway, its a more evolved unit.... and it costs about hald as much. Try one at that price and its hard to loose. Im doing a Warmoth build and Im going with the Gotoh.
 

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Mutes the Meat
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Well, I like that they are lo-profile, already come with the brass block and you can choose how big you want, are smoother on the hand, very well made in Japan, dont use that screw coller I hate- have a push in arm. To me anyway, its a more evolved unit.... and it costs about hald as much. Try one at that price and its hard to loose. Im doing a Warmoth build and Im going with the Gotoh.
:yesway:

Where are you buying yours from? I'm having a little trouble finding the best US dealer for Gotoh.
 

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Is Actually Recording
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
They switched on their 6's, but not their 7s. And OFR now offers a pop-in arm, and it's awesome. :yesway:

Can oyu use Gotoh locking studs with Floyd anchors? I always liked those on the Ibby Edge.
 

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Is Actually Recording
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Im not sure but I think I remember them not working together??
Yeah, I had a feeling that would be the case. I'm about to run out the door, but let me quickly pop out the trem and get a video of the amount of lay I'm talking about, it seems like it should be too much.

EDIRT - now with video. There;s really a fair amount of play, to the degree tat you can feel it in the bar. It *feels* a little like a loose arm holder in the way there's some play before the bridge begins to move, but I've ruled that out, the arm is rock-steady too.

 

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Dream Crusher
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By all accounts Suhr has great customer service, so maybe reach out to them?
 

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Hates Richie Kotzen
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The posts that screw into the inserts move? Like, D isn't ultra snug in E?



+1 to what Rocka said. That's not unusual at all, especially on used older guitars. As Rocka said, mostly it's not an issue, because even if they aren't ultra snug when the actual trem assembly (the part with the baseplate) is making contact with them, once the whole thing is strung up and at tension they aren't going to move.

It can occasionally be an issue. Not really a big deal though. Due to the compartmentalized design of shit like that if the issue is there you can just replace both the posts and the sleeve inserts. Which is like, $30 in parts tops.

The worst case scenario (which you obviously seem to not have due to your description) would involve the inserts themselves being unstable. And even that is fixed by the relatively minor repair that would, at its most severe, consist of filling the post holes and redrilling them and installing new parts.

Teflon tape or loc-tite would both work. If you don't want to fuck around with incremental fixes, buying replacement parts isn't that much more expensive.

If you're the handy type and can use it for other stuff a tap and die set is also something to consider having on hand. I wouldn't get it just for guitar hardware. But it's a piece of kit for cleaning up threads.

Those are good tools to have on hand, though somewhat specialty for the majority of people. They are useful if you have something like an old TOM assembly and you don't want to switch out just one piece because it's an older guitar and the hardware all has the same patina. But some of the threading has degraded from age and use so you have to clean it up.

They are specialty though, in the sense that a good one is costly, and unless you have a specific reason to it's usually just a better idea to get a new screw or insert the screw goes into.





Tremendously useful for cleaning up threading that has chipped or gone bad with age.

Not that it would be useful in your case. If the fit is too loose and the parts are relatively new the problem most likely isn't that the threading needs to be recut.
 

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Hates Richie Kotzen
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You can also just redo the entire thing for the OG style wood screw posts, which a lot of people prefer. :lol:

I don't prefer them. But a lot of people do. Why floyd rose still sells them obviously. You don't have to deal with threaded insert->bushing sleeve->wood of guitar body. It's trem post -> guitar body.



The threaded inserts into bushings is obviously more elegant. And it obviously replaced the original design because guitars made out of soft woods like basswood don't do well with the wood screw version. But the "wood screw posts directly into guitar" setup can be rock solid. some purists prefer it.

Floyd Rose has actually sold more expensive kits with the wood screws instead of the insert->bushing anchor kits for a while now. :lol: A lot of people definitely find it ridiculous to pay extra to get those more primitive touches, but a lot of people also don't.
 

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I am Groot
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FWIW I’ve found the seven strong bridges don’t flutter as well as sixes, full stop. Too much string tension.

I have noticed that the biggest flutter killer is the collared arm. You need to really crank it down or it bleeds off all the vibration before it reaches the bridge. If you’re using the push in arm, and I assume you are, then this is a non-issue.

I’ve always noticed a very slight play in all studs that screw into press in bushings, even a TOM. I’ve never noticed it with strong tension on the bridge, though. If you want to switch to the Gotoh studs, you’ll need to replace the bushings. The trick it to buy a machine bolt with the same thread depth and spacing, and screw it into the bushing with a wrench. It eventually bottoms out and draws out the bushing. Inserting the new bushing requires a similar bolt screwed into the bushing, so you can use a rubber mallet to strike the head of the bolt to drive it in.
 

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I am Groot
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Floyd Rose has actually sold more expensive kits with the wood screws instead of the insert->bushing anchor kits for a while now. :lol: A lot of people definitely find it ridiculous to pay extra to get those more primitive touches, but a lot of people also don't.
Wood screws are a pain in the ass to install straight, but once they're in you'll never think about them again. They don't back out or oval out. Floyd made the switch because manufacturers desired a faster, easier installation. Anything anyone says about final improvements is absolute bunk.
 

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Hates Richie Kotzen
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^The amazing thing about wood screws in guitar building is that everyone can see the appeal of switching to inserts for a trem/bridge assembly, but somehow bolt on neck inserts have never caught on.

:lol:

There are a bunch of cool kits out there, but in terms of most people, there will be blood if you try to get them to switch to something arguably better on a more critical portion of the guitar.



Wood screws obviously work perfectly when done competently into suitable wood no matter where they are. But my least favorite part of buying bolt on guitars is thinking about how much the past owner has amateurishly fucked around with the wood screws when unnecessarily removing the neck. If you like removing necks, inserts are the way to go.
 
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