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Hates Richie Kotzen
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Anything non locking. I assume whats a good nut on a hardtail is a good nut on a vintage trem guitar. You want the same qualities in both. Or at least I would think.
 

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NSLALP
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I always figure that a graphite nut (TUSQ etc) is best when using a trem, at least from a convenience standpoint. You can always make your own graphite jelly with a pencil and Vasoline, though.

I don't know what could really be better than bone for overall hardness and precision of contact, but it won't let the string slide as easily when bending/whooping. Corian is a good nut material too, quite hard.
 

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I don't like it.
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I always figure that a graphite nut (TUSQ etc) is best when using a trem, at least from a convenience standpoint. You can always make your own graphite jelly with a pencil and Vasoline, though.

I don't know what could really be better than bone for overall hardness and precision of contact, but it won't let the string slide as easily when bending/whooping. Corian is a good nut material too, quite hard.
Tusq is made to sound like bone but lubricate like graphite... it does both, quite well.
 

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NSLALP
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Tusq is made to sound like bone but lubricate like graphite... it does both, quite well.
That was my impression. :agreed:

It's a synthetic ivory impregnated with Teflon. Thought it was graphite, but must have been "Graphtech" sticking in my head. You can get a vintage white or black, to boot.

 

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Dream Crusher
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Either that, or they're now paying EBMM a licensing fee.
 

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It increases surface contact quality in a lot of cases and also adds a more solid quality to the tone if you are moving from plastic to virtually any other material.

Some nuts such as brass also add a good portion of brightness into the tone also
 

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It increases surface contact quality in a lot of cases and also adds a more solid quality to the tone if you are moving from plastic to virtually any other material.
Shouldnt the surface contact quality (??) not matter after the first fret? CAuse after the first fret, your tone is coming from the string, your finger, the pickup and the wood. The part behind the fret your pressing wont even resonate enough to make a sound, yeah?
 

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In theory yes it shouldnt but the angle that it breaks at the nut and the pressure at this point is usually greater than when you are fretting so it will still have an effect to an extent.
 

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Slow Money
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Humboldt Squid said:
It increases surface contact quality in a lot of cases and also adds a more solid quality to the tone if you are moving from plastic to virtually any other material.
Shouldnt the surface contact quality (??) not matter after the first fret? CAuse after the first fret, your tone is coming from the string, your finger, the pickup and the wood. The part behind the fret your pressing wont even resonate enough to make a sound, yeah?
Nuts make a very big difference. I can't explain why, but you can swap a bone nut out for a brass nut, and the difference can be as dramatic as a pickup change, all the way up the neck.
 
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