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At the moment, despite following their video instructions, SSD5 isn't showing up in Logic, even after rebooting and rescanning plugins!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
What do you think of it, so far?

SSD4 has been my go-to for hard rock/metal drums. I heard the toms are much improved, which has been my biggest problem with Slate drums.
Yeah the toms in SSD4 aren't very useful for me. They have this "cardboard box sound" with no depth in the lower toms.
I hope this is better in SSD5.

One thing I REALLY like in SSD5 from just trying out SSD5 Free for a few seconds before it freezing my DAW: you can finally adjust individual crash volume, and more indepth panning of ride/hihat in the room/overhead mics separetely. I don't think I ever found out how to do that in SSD4. You could just pan the entire room mic subgroup, but there was no panning for "hihat in the room" for example, not what I could find.
 

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ya boi
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What do you think of it, so far?

SSD4 has been my go-to for hard rock/metal drums. I heard the toms are much improved, which has been my biggest problem with Slate drums.
The kit in SSD5 Free is better than the one I had in the cheap SSD4 that I had, and also sounds better than most of the Trigger samples I have. Though that's 100% preference, the snare is a lot brighter and snappier to me, and the toms sound better.

However, I'm a bit disappointed by the feature set. It's just a slightly improved SSD4 rather than the big changeup it probably should have been. Rocka mentioned some good changes, but there isn't a whole lot. I'm upset they still haven't included a reverb channel so I could use it as an all-in-one, but maybe others don't mind that so much.

SD3, in terms of features, has SSD5 blown out of the water. If you're really into SSD samples then SSD5 is probably worth it, otherwise I'd probably recommend SD3 or something.
 

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However, I'm a bit disappointed by the feature set. It's just a slightly improved SSD4 rather than the big changeup it probably should have been. Rocka mentioned some good changes, but there isn't a whole lot. I'm upset they still haven't included a reverb channel so I could use it as an all-in-one, but maybe others don't mind that so much.

SD3, in terms of features, has SSD5 blown out of the water. If you're really into SSD samples then SSD5 is probably worth it, otherwise I'd probably recommend SD3 or something.
Definitely feeling the same. I'm a long term SSD user and I was hoping for something on par with SD3 function wise, I'll probably still do the Platinum upgrade while it's at Crossgrade pricing.

I'm definitely happy hearing that the toms are improved. Anyone have any thoughts about the overhead quality? I've ended up using SSD4 for Kick, Snare and Toms, SD for OH and Room because the Slate crashes in particular sounded pretty fake.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The kit in SSD5 Free is better than the one I had in the cheap SSD4 that I had, and also sounds better than most of the Trigger samples I have. Though that's 100% preference, the snare is a lot brighter and snappier to me, and the toms sound better.

However, I'm a bit disappointed by the feature set. It's just a slightly improved SSD4 rather than the big changeup it probably should have been. Rocka mentioned some good changes, but there isn't a whole lot. I'm upset they still haven't included a reverb channel so I could use it as an all-in-one, but maybe others don't mind that so much.

SD3, in terms of features, has SSD5 blown out of the water. If you're really into SSD samples then SSD5 is probably worth it, otherwise I'd probably recommend SD3 or something.
I just forgot to tell about something I think is REALLY IMPORTANT UPGRADE!
A great thing with the new SSD5 is that you can also adjust the length of room / overhead mics = AWESOME.

I always liked the room sound of the "Black album snare", but it was just mushing out too much in faster songs. Now I could finally adjust the room sound to cut faster, and thus reducing amount of "room mush" and still have it prominent in the mix :D
 

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It's almost like Reaper is a superior DAW, and that's why we all plug it so much! :lol:
I was a Pro Tools user many many years ago and had way too many crashes on a mac. Switched to a PC / Reaper and no issues. Granted technology has come a long way since then.
 

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I used to use Cakewalk forever, same thing. All these modern DAWs are awesome, I'm just being a dink. :lol:

Reaper is the goods though. :yesway:
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I've tried Reaper but I dont like it.

I cannot navigate around the projects like I can in Cubase. I depend completely on mouse+timeline for zooming and traveling around the project. I have done so for the last 16 years and it's SUPER FAST.
This has been the dealbreaker with every other DAW I've tried, because none of them can navigate like Cubase
 

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I've tried Reaper but I dont like it.

I cannot navigate around the projects like I can in Cubase. I depend completely on mouse+timeline for zooming and traveling around the project. I have done so for the last 16 years and it's SUPER FAST.
This has been the dealbreaker with every other DAW I've tried, because none of them can navigate like Cubase
I'm a longtime cubase user, however, I seem to prefer 8 to the newer versions, as for some reason they seem to like changing the layout with every release meaning I need to relearn where to find everything. One thing I wish is that they'd allow old folk like me to keep a familiar layout on the UI instead of moving things I use a lot.

Or maybe I should just spend more time relearning where everything is lol

But navigation wise, cubase is really easy, love it for demoing.

I tried really hard to like pro tools, but everything in it was painful, so for demoing ideas, it is rubbish
 

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Reaper was painful to learn, but now I enjoy the ability to come up with weird and wonderful ways to route things. It rarely crashes on me, too--only when I try to have too many VSTis blaring away at once. The freeze function is critical.

I'm looking forward to trying out SSD5. Slate has said that he didn't include all the bells and whistles that SD and BFD have because he's under the impression that most users prefer to mix the raw samples in the DAW channels rather than in the VSTi. I'm kind of in-between on that--partly because my drum mixing skills are not optimal.

I find that the SSD4 samples need less mixing help--probably because they have some production baked into them. Ultimately, I went with BFD3 for my 5 at 50 EP, just because they have a more natural sound, and the cymbals are amazing.
 

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I've tried Reaper but I dont like it.

I cannot navigate around the projects like I can in Cubase. I depend completely on mouse+timeline for zooming and traveling around the project. I have done so for the last 16 years and it's SUPER FAST.
This has been the dealbreaker with every other DAW I've tried, because none of them can navigate like Cubase
"If it ain't broke, don't fix it" and all, but... I guarantee you that you can configure Reaper to navigate like Cubase. I didn't like the stock mouse wheel navigation either so I changed it. I think stock is up and down scrolling is forward and backward in time, and I flipped it to up and down scrolling is up and down in the window, but if Cubase does something different I'm sure you can replicate that too.
 
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