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THUNDERBEEEEAR!
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3,920 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you're like me, a novice in digital recording, you should definitely read This thread on the reaper forums.
I've learned more from that than the books I've read so far. This guy should write his own.
 

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Premium Member
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He really does. I'm only on the first page, and already I'm wishing I'd seen something like this five or ten years ago.

Also:

Lawrence said:
At the listening position. Anything you measure related to it possibly affecting your mix decisions should be measured there since that's where you'll be. I have an area that propagates standing waves in the back of my control room that I left there on purpose. More bass for the producers and clients. Less requests of "more bass".

I trapped it a little but not as much as I could have.
This is brilliant on SO many levels. :lol:

EDIT - on the second page. Considering we're hitting what I in my finite experience would consider relatively "in depth" stuff, at least for the typical home recorder, and there's another 38 pages to go, I definitely need to sit down and read through this whole thread sometime when I have more time. This is potentially an awesome resource.

EDIT #2 - he keeps coming back to "trust your ears," and I think rightly so. On a personal note, I've never been 100% happy with my mixes - the low end always sounded kind of mushy and indistinct. I figured it was just the bass guitar, which in part it certainly was, but I've made a lot of progress there lately and have a much better bass tone than I used to, and I'm still not satisfied.

So, what I finally did that made a world of difference was finding a guitar sound that I both liked and thought would be attainable with my gear, and then really sitting down and doing some comparative listening to my tracks and the recorded finished product. Obviously this isn't exact, even after balancing levels you're still hearing mastered products against raw tracks, but what really shocked me was just how bright modern metal guitar is. I'd been dialing in a much more balanced, darker tone, but really most hard rock and metal guitar I was comparing my mixes to was thinner and brighter, and cut through the mix more than it fleshed it out. A few EQ tweaks, some mic repositioning, and suddenly what I'm hearing is significantly better.

Sometimes, if a mix isn't working, just really sitting down and honing in on specific parts of a mix that DOES work can really be an eye/ear-opening experience. :yesway:
 

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THUNDERBEEEEAR!
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3,920 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
He really does. I'm only on the first page, and already I'm wishing I'd seen something like this five or ten years ago.

Also:

This is brilliant on SO many levels. :lol:

EDIT - on the second page. Considering we're hitting what I in my finite experience would consider relatively "in depth" stuff, at least for the typical home recorder, and there's another 38 pages to go, I definitely need to sit down and read through this whole thread sometime when I have more time. This is potentially an awesome resource.
Yes, quite in depth, but he has a REALLY good ability to explain things in simple terms.

EDIT #2 - he keeps coming back to "trust your ears," and I think rightly so. On a personal note, I've never been 100% happy with my mixes - the low end always sounded kind of mushy and indistinct. I figured it was just the bass guitar, which in part it certainly was, but I've made a lot of progress there lately and have a much better bass tone than I used to, and I'm still not satisfied.
I'm having the same experience, but things got alot:hsquid: better when I got my KRK's and a sub that plays well down to 30hz. I also find myself basing my stuff around the bass tone/drums more these days instead of around the guitars. You know, start with the basics and work your way up.

So, what I finally did that made a world of difference was finding a guitar sound that I both liked and thought would be attainable with my gear, and then really sitting down and doing some comparative listening to my tracks and the recorded finished product. Obviously this isn't exact, even after balancing levels you're still hearing mastered products against raw tracks, but what really shocked me was just how bright modern metal guitar is. I'd been dialing in a much more balanced, darker tone, but really most hard rock and metal guitar I was comparing my mixes to was thinner and brighter, and cut through the mix more than it fleshed it out. A few EQ tweaks, some mic repositioning, and suddenly what I'm hearing is significantly better.
:yesway: I let my friend borrow my jcm800 because I found it a bit daunting to get started with mic positioning and all that jazz. Just using the podX3 is satisfactory at my current level.

Sometimes, if a mix isn't working, just really sitting down and honing in on specific parts of a mix that DOES work can really be an eye/ear-opening experience. :yesway:
Blindfold:yesway:
 

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THUNDERBEEEEAR!
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3,920 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So after reading through nine pages I decided to to give myself a little test and recorded some (very) untight riffage. Haven't been able to crosscheck against other speakers yet so if you could listen to it and give some constructive critiscism it would be great.

usual setup, podx3, superior, bass straight into the impact twin.
 

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Great snippet from that thread:

It is not a fair comparison to listen to two sources unless they are at the same average level. See if this sounds familiar:

Joe Blow records some stuff. Doesn't sound as good as his favorite records, sounds a little dull. He adds some highs. Sounds better, but a little thin. Adds some lows, sounds a little better, but a little hollow. Adds some mids, sounds a little better, but still sounds kind of harsh. He adds some reverb, sounds a little better, but now he notices it's clipping. So he turns down the levels.

Now it sounds a little dull, so he adds some more highs. Better, but a little thin, so he adds some lows...

Repeat until 2am, go to bed, and wake up to find that the "improved" recording sounds like a vortex of shit.

Now replace every instance of "better" above with "louder" and see if you get the idea
 

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Premium Member
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Thanks for the bump - I'd forgotten about this, and made it through another couple pages today. His bit on gain staging is awesome - a very clear, intuitive explanation.
 

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Premium Member
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Bumping this because I've been reading a bit more today, and this really is excellent.
 

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Dream Crusher
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Nowadays every musician is supposed to sound like a sonic super-hero. The bass player who earns his living as a professional octave pedal with tattoos and who occasionally plays a leading seventh must be clearly heard, for all to appreciate his seventh-playing prowess in all its glory. The punk guitarist palm-muting quarter-notes in the key of the fretboard dots has to have sixteen tracks lest the chunka-chunka fail to overwhelm and subdue any aspect of the listener's central nervous system. The DJ whose sheer artistry allows him to hold a headphone with a single shoulder while simultaneously operating a fader and playing records must not be made to feel like a second-class citizen by having his performance obscured by more pedantic forms of music.
:lol:

This guy has a great sense of humor about it too.
 

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THUNDERBEEEEAR!
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
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