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Sorry, I don't pay attention to filthy indie rock pukes.
 

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Yep :agreed: I don't know if it'll be months, but it's not long. I don't know that they'll necessarily die completely, but they'll be forced to completely change what they do, and how they do it.

These days, your best bet is to sign a distribution deal, get your own booking agent (for out of town/tours mainly, handle local yourself), manager (or at least assign someone in the band to handle all incoming/outgoing communication), and someone to handle your promotions (i.e. solicit reviews, interviews, advertising, etc.), and maintain as much control, and do as much as you can yourself (more money for you if there's fewer hands in between).

Of course, he's only referring to the few remaining major labels (i.e. not any label that any of your favourite bands are signed to, for the most part. Roadrunner, Metal Blade, etc. are big indie labels, really).

Further evidence of the situation:
ExploreMusic.com said:
Here's the Deal with CD Sales

The other day I talked about how bad CD sales have been over the last month or so. Well, it just keeps getting worse. For the week ending May 30, a total of 4,984,000 albums were sold in the US. That's a combination of all the current albums available and all the catalogue titles in the stores. In a nation of more than 300 million, less than 5 million records were bought. This is the lowest number in decades-perhaps since the 1970s.

To put it another way, in December 2000, 45.4 million albums were sold in a single week.

No, this does not include digital track sales. Almost 22 million of those were sold in the same period. But digital sales can't make up the lost revenue.

Here's my prediction: this spring will eventually go down in history as a huge turning point in the music industry. We're moving more and more towards being more concerned about accessing whatever song we want rather than possessing it.
 

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NSLALP
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sorry, I don't pay attention to filthy indie rock pukes.
I've been accused of looking like him :ugh: Definitely cleaner-cut though.

With the advent of mass downloading though, they certainly are under pressure yeah? I'm pretty sure their paradigm is already shifting as far as how they handle new acts, distribution deals... now it's all about merchandising vs. album sales, for example. :shrug:
 

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The music industry, as a whole, has done two big things wrong, leading to the state we are in right now:

1) The focus shifted from signing talented bands and developing them, and moved to finding bands that can fit the trend, dropping them if they don't sell big in the first couple of albums. To drive the sales, they make sure there is one or two string singles, and the rest of the album doesn't matter. Not only has this worked to kill the album format, but it has also disenfranchised the listener, who no longer feels the desire to go buy music.

2) They absolutely refused to see the writing on the wall with the Internet, ignoring it until it got too big to kill, and then made themselves the enemy by coming down so hard on downloading. Had they responded early, they would have gotten people into the habit of buying music online. Instead, they let people grow accustomed to the easy, free acquisition of music, and changing the behavior now is extremely problematic. The let the consumers develop the method of acquisition (music sharing sites) AND the format it was delivered in (MP3). The pricing model doesn't even reflect that you don't get physical media or an album sleeve/insert, and to make matters worse, they have tried to take the stance that if you buy the CD, you still have no right to download the MP3s, and vise versa. In addition, CDs have been priced artificially high, while media costs have dropped, and artists royalties have stayed flat and/or declined.

Basically, the music industry has failed to change their business model, in the same way as the print journalism industry, and is therefore dying off in much the same way. On one hand, it is completely natural for innovation and technology to change the way the market works, obsoleting certain products and industry. On the other hand, it really sucks when it something that is so emotionally impactful, like music/art.
 

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^ :agreed: All that, combined with the fact that it is infinitely easier for artists to make it on their own for much longer.

The music will never die, just the way people make money from it. If anything, there's more music, more readily available than ever before. There's just not much money changing hands for it.
 

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NSLALP
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
All good points Noodles, but surely the music won't die. The whole major label thing didn't get ridiculous until the 60's I figure, so if it had a 50-year run and then we head in a more enlightened direction... :yesway: I don't know if we'll still see multi-millionaire rockers, depends on how sharp they are as businessmen?
 

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People aren't buying albums retail because they're buying songs on iTunes. The music industry is fine.
Tell that to the artists, who get fucked worse from iTunes sales than they do from CD sales. I'm not 100% sure if this is still happening, but for a while, the labels were still recouping physical packaging fees from iTunes sales.

The music industry is fine, the major labels are not unless they change. Thom Yorke isn't saying the music will die, or even that the industry will die, just the major labels (who have been dying one by one for years) who refuse to change the way they do business, and instead try to force people to do things the old way.
 

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Tell that to the artists, who get fucked worse from iTunes sales than they do from CD sales. I'm not 100% sure if this is still happening, but for a while, the labels were still recouping physical packaging fees from iTunes sales.

The music industry is fine, the major labels are not unless they change. Thom Yorke isn't saying the music will die, or even that the industry will die, just the major labels (who have been dying one by one for years) who refuse to change the way they do business, and instead try to force people to do things the old way.
Labels have been screwing artists for years, it's about time they get screwed in turn.

Just about everyone I know in a touring band makes 99.9% of their money from playing live (merch, tickets, etc). My buddy got signed to universal for 1M, and when all was said and done he got a check for under 40k. That was his cut.
 

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There's probably 10x more people that care about Radiohead than any of your favorite band.
Neg, My favorite band is Iron Maiden. :fawk: :wub: The entire South American continent begs to differ. :lol:

But they are crazy popular, no doubt. I'd go see 'em live if I had a free ticket, not into them/him enough to pay, but I hear the show is pretty insane.
 

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Labels have been screwing artists for years, it's about time they get screwed in turn.

Just about everyone I know in a touring band makes 99.9% of their money from playing live (merch, tickets, etc). My buddy got signed to universal for 1M, and when all was said and done he got a check for under 40k. That was his cut.
Agreed fully, that's why I'm not sad at all that the industry's changing and the big fuck-you labels are going down in flames :lol:
 

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Neg, My favorite band is Iron Maiden. :fawk: :wub: The entire South American continent begs to differ. :lol:

But they are crazy popular, no doubt. I'd go see 'em live if I had a free ticket, not into them/him enough to pay, but I hear the show is pretty insane.
:lol:

I'd take Maiden over Radiohead any day, but yeah, they're crazy popular all over the world.

IMHO, they're probably the best alternative music band to make it from the very start of the grunge wave (remember "Creep"?), detach themselves from that trend wich they never really were a part of... And then make it trough the 90's and early 2000's with quality albums one after another.

They have crazy good songs and I own 4 of their albums... And never paid to go and see them live. Always heard their shows are epic with a capital E, but I guess I don't like them enough to make the move.
 
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