Metal Guitarist Forums banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Read Only
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone tung oiled a guitar body? I'm thinking about a Warmoth parts-o-caster, and just oiling the body instead of having it painted.

My questions

- How hard is it?
- Do I need to do anything other than just rubbing the oil on the body?
- Any concerns with just having an oiled body?
- Any gotchas to know about?

Thanks in advance.
 

·
Mr. Negative Pants, ,
Joined
·
14,796 Posts
It can be very hard... not poly hard, but it will offer decent protection.

The oil hardens through a process of polymerization. Raw tung oil takes a while to cure and fully harden, but it will leave a fairly durable surface on most hard woods. You can also buy polymerized tung oil (sometimes called "tung oil finish") which has been boiled to speed up the polymerization process. It has mineral spirits in it to speed the drying time, but it will dry faster and cure harder than straight tung oil, with the slight trade-off of lending a slightly yellow tint. (Straight tung oil won't tint the wood.)

One big advantage of oil finishes: If the finish gets scuffed, scratched or worn, you just apply more finish, and it bonds with the old finish. Maintaining the finish is fairly easy.

Follow the directions on the can for how to apply it, as various brands will have slightly different instructions depending on what additives are in it. But essentially, you apply a thick layer of oil, allow it to penetrate, then wipe it off and allow it to dry. It can also be applied "French polish" style, by hand-rubbing many very thin layers.

Straight tung oil is nice to work with, because there are no solvents to stink the place up, so you can work with it indoors. Polymerized tung oils have solvents, so you're probably not going to want to use them in the house, unless you have a very well-ventilated room.

Caveats? Softer woods such as basswood will soak up a LOT of oil and it won't give them much protection. It's best used on harder woods. Closed-pore woods like maple and walnut take oil finishes beautifully, with no grain filling really necessary. Open-pored woods like mahogany, you're probably going to want to fill first. It's also not a completely maintenance-free finish, but as i mentioned before, touch-ups and repairs are fairly easy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
32,450 Posts
I've tung oiled necks before, but never a whole body. The same principal applies, though: multiple coats, 0000 steel wool between coats.
 

·
Mr. Negative Pants, ,
Joined
·
14,796 Posts
Tru-Oil is essentially a polymerized tung oil product. Another nice thing with polymerized tung oil is you can control the sheen... you can go matte, or you can go shiny, or anywhere in between, just by mixing.
 

·
Uses more gain than you.
Joined
·
4,377 Posts
Tru-Oil is essentially a polymerized tung oil product. Another nice thing with polymerized tung oil is you can control the sheen... you can go matte, or you can go shiny, or anywhere in between, just by mixing.
Ah, it's pretty different from the Formby's I've used before(which I kinda associate with polymerized tung oil lol). I know what you mean though, I went light on my rg565's neck, and it feels very raw and matte, while I used more coats on my partscaster's neck which almost looks like it has a sprayed finish.
 

·
Mr. Negative Pants, ,
Joined
·
14,796 Posts
You can dye the wood and then oil it. I'm not sure if tung oil itself can be dyed, but it wouldn't surprise me.

Bri-Wax is wax, not oil. You can apply wax after you've oiled, but was is more of a "polish" than a protectant, as it wears off rather quickly.
 

·
Dream Crusher
Joined
·
21,053 Posts
You get grainfiller of whatever color you want, apply it, sand it back, repeat till you get the effect you want. Dark grainfiller looks awesome on Swamp Ash and can add some interest to open-pored woods like mahogany.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,188 Posts
What's involved in filling the grain?
Grain Filler and sanding. :D

I have a can of clear grain filler. You brush it on and sand it all back down to the wood. Personally, if I'm just using tung-oil on a body, I prefer to leave the grain unfilled. I like to be able to feel the texture of the grain.

Both my strat and Star originally just had a tung oil finish. Ended up hating it because it's just not real durable. Ended up sanding it off and using a lacquer finish.
 

·
Slow Money
Joined
·
14,612 Posts
My tele is a warmoth body and neck, and the neck is laquered (came that way) but the body i stained with minwax colored stain, and then tung oiled using semi gloss formbys, i love it. Finish isnt super durable as donnie said, but i can sand it off and redo it all in maybe about an hour if i want :yesway:
 

·
Reverend Secret Flower
Joined
·
11,837 Posts
my zebra rg is a tru-oil finish. i didnt even bother filling the grain. its not necessary. if you just slater the oil on there, it coats the inner grain area and works fine.

i went with this finish to enjoy the natural feel of the wood and i didnt want to have the grain filled and lose that



its easy to do. i dont know how you could even mess it up.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top