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Hates Richie Kotzen
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I had a specific thread in mind, but it's bass-centric, and I think I saw a tumbleweed blow by in the bass section of this site.

So share times you unlearned a technique you had either been doing wrong or whatever. Interesting topic.

First time I've tried doing it for this, total bitch, when I started playing music all I ever wanted to be was Steve Harris, so fingerstyle with two fingers. Unfortunately, the standard for faster metal has been three since the mid 90s, since there are certain limitations to two when you get past a certain bpm or are playing more intricate lines in fast songs.

I've done faux 3 for years. I can throw in the ring finger if I consciously think about it, especially if it's on a single string, but the Steve Harris technique is so absolutely ingrained in me that unless I am very conscious of it, I just revert.

If it's stuff that's on the higher strings, or skipping strings you can't really afford a sloppy technique, because fingerstyle bass is as much about muting as it is about sounding the notes.

Anyways, there are like, two other fingerstyle bass dudes here who do three finger extreme metal, although the technique is the same as classical, you guys do 123212321 or 123123123 (numbers corresponding to order of fingers), I doubt it matters, but I do the first, although I think the second might be easier to consciously incorporate.

Anyways, anyone have their own experiences on the subject?
 

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Arrr, Matey!
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I will be interested to hear their input as well, because while I'm relatively quick with the 2 finger Steve Harris method, there are times where I have to either 1) play it sloppily or 2) use a pick because I can't pluck fast enough with just the two.
 

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I can't talk to bass....

I've been taking guitar lessons for about six years now. One of the things the teacher noticed is that when I alternate pick I do a small articulation with my thumb, which was limiting my speed, particularly in cross string picking. I practiced picking without moving my thumb for 5-10 minutes every day, starting slow, and then working it up to speed. For the most part it's now completely natural, though there are a few times I revert (gallops on a single string, for example). At the same time I also switched picks from standard Fender size to Jazz IIIs. I couldn't play well for months, but I knew it would pay off. Now I can't use the bigger picks, it's like trying to play the guitar with a brick.

Anyway... start slow, make some conscious effort to practice it, and be patient.

Of course, that's not the quick fix answer, but it did work for me. :shrug:
 

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Look what I can do
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I'm not by any means a good bassist, but I trudge along with it because its fun. When I try and do 3-finger to keep up with alternate picking it usually ends being something like 12131213 or something like that. Don't have a bass on hand to see what I actually do.

As far as unlearning though, over the past few months I switched the way I hold my pick from that backwards angle that Ola showed some videos of to the more standardized technique. It was fucking painful, when I first switched it was like I'd never picked up a guitar before in my life. I went from practicing with As The Palaces Burn and The Sound Of Perserverance...to struggling HARD with the intro to Smoke on the Water. I had some guys around me who might as well be Petrucci or Vai or Becker compared to what I can do that were convincing me it was worth the change though. So after a month or so of trying to figure it out, it turned into a full blown crisis... I still couldn't grasp the proper technique very well, but now I was also losing touch with the backwards way I'd always played, so my playing in general took a huge hit. After another month or so though I was well on my way to getting back to where I was, but with the proper technique. Within another month or so I now actually have trouble trying to play the backwards way and I'm having a much easier time with everything using the proper technique. It was painful, but definitely worth the pain and trouble.

ETA: Was typing when Matt posted. The pick choice thing is another big one for me. That's my newest crisis. After switching pick angles I found I was having a hard time using the picks I'd been using for the past 10 years or so....Dunlop Tortex Jazz 1.14mm. I just couldn't seem to hold on to them anymore. I've switched over to the yellow/translucent Ultex Jazz. Its definitely grippier and easy to hold, comfortable, but I feel like its difficult to get a really good attack with it...kind of rolls over the strings too easily rather than digging into them. Every couple days now I go through a pile of picks looking for something better and just can't settle. I definitely still can't use the full size things though...so thats still a thing.:scratch::nuts:
 

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Could be Hitler
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At the same time I also switched picks from standard Fender size to Jazz IIIs. I couldn't play well for months, but I knew it would pay off. Now I can't use the bigger picks, it's like trying to play the guitar with a brick.

Nonsense

Best. Pick. Ever!:cool:
 

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NSLALP
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To support what Crooks shared: In order to unlearn, you must simply stop doing the wrong thing and practice it the right way. Every time. Without fail.

The bitch of it is that means deconstructing your technique which means you suddenly can't play for shit (compared to your previous perceived level).

But it will pay off, and probably quickly.
 

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For the first 6 years that I played guitar, I pretty much only did downpicking. About 12 years ago, I decided to learn alternate picking and I now do it without even thinking about it. But, in a way, it was like "unlearning" my 100% downpicking at first because I was used to playing everything with down-strokes.

One thing that I kind of tried to learn is tapping with my middle finger (and thus "un-learn" tapping with my index finger), but I still don't do that. I just find tapping with my index finger to be 10000x better, but I see guitarists doing crazy tapping with their middle finger all the time. It's just that I couldn't get up the same amount of strength and accuracy that I have in my index finger. It'd definitely be more convenient if I could tap with my middle finger just as accurately.

That's about all that comes to mind.
 
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I had a specific thread in mind, but it's bass-centric, and I think I saw a tumbleweed blow by in the bass section of this site.

So share times you unlearned a technique you had either been doing wrong or whatever. Interesting topic.

First time I've tried doing it for this, total bitch, when I started playing music all I ever wanted to be was Steve Harris, so fingerstyle with two fingers. Unfortunately, the standard for faster metal has been three since the mid 90s, since there are certain limitations to two when you get past a certain bpm or are playing more intricate lines in fast songs.

I've done faux 3 for years. I can throw in the ring finger if I consciously think about it, especially if it's on a single string, but the Steve Harris technique is so absolutely ingrained in me that unless I am very conscious of it, I just revert.

If it's stuff that's on the higher strings, or skipping strings you can't really afford a sloppy technique, because fingerstyle bass is as much about muting as it is about sounding the notes.

Anyways, there are like, two other fingerstyle bass dudes here who do three finger extreme metal, although the technique is the same as classical, you guys do 123212321 or 123123123 (numbers corresponding to order of fingers), I doubt it matters, but I do the first, although I think the second might be easier to consciously incorporate.

Anyways, anyone have their own experiences on the subject?
My experience on the subject would be learning how to play fingerstyle correctly from a classical guitar teacher. My self taught technique was horrible in every way. 123123123 is definitely the way to go. With practice you'll be able to get a very smooth tremelo on demand, it's simply muscle memory and the physical mechanics are much easier. Also turn your hand slighty, you can pluck much faster, stronger, and more consistently at a slight angle than straight on.
 

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Is Actually Recording
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My story is similar to Crooks' - When I first tried to really learn how to pick, it was when I picked up a pretty decent scale book that hhad arranged scale patterns in shhapes optimized for economy picking, and I bought it mostly because the economy approach seemed to make a lot of sense to me.

In college, however, I took lessons from a great guitarist who, while recognizing the validity of economy picking, also suggested I spend some time learning alternate picking, as even if ultimately I didn't end up rpeferring it to economy it was still a different technique with a subtly different sound, and it was worth knowing both.

Not that I'm a great alternate picker by any means, but he was right, and I ended up choosing to switch over almost entirely to alteernate picking for a number of reasons. These days, the economy picking movement feels incredible unnatural to me, while at first it was very hard to NOT link pickstrokes between strings.

It just takes time and repetition.
 

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Could be Hitler
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Not baked anymore.
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For me, taking time away from the instrument has done best. I've switching between singer/guitarist for the last 10 years so at various points, either side has gotten neglected....when I get back to it, the mentality behind the approach is different than it was before.

When I think about playing/singing, I'm going through it in my head how I *want* it to sound/be achieved. I work it all out mentally before a physical movement is involved.....but the other part is the time away. When I quit my last band a year and a half ago, I stopped singing all together because I blew my throat out a few times. I knew I was on the right path but had a lot of bad habits. So when I sing in my head, I make the physical movements in my body that I would be doing if I were projecting it. I've been doing this since I quit and once I started singing again, aside from the rusty bolts, I was getting MUCH further ahead then where I was before.

It's much more mental for me than physical. I make more progress thinking about what I'm playing than I do actually playing it. Guitar or singing. But I break it down in my head, with guitar, I'm thinking about what joints are moving and where/when.....with vocals, I'm thinking about placement in my throat and tension.

So essentially, I've re-taught myself in my head before physically doing it. So far, it's proven successful as when I do sing these days, my pitch is so much more dead on and my delivery isn't nearly as contrived.
 
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