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Premium Member
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3,930 Posts
I've been playing with this as well lately in arpeggios:

E--
B--
G--
D--7
A--6
E--3

and

E--
B--
G--
D--5
A--4
E--2

they're sort of Fripp-esque :yesway:
 

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Mutes the Meat
Joined
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10,236 Posts
Some of my favorites.

e-----
B-----
G-----
D---2-
A---3-
E---5-

e-----
B-----
G-----
D---2-
A---3-
E---3-


e-----
B-----
G-----
D---2-
A---3-
E---1-


e-----
B-----
G---5-
D---7-
A---0-
E-----

You can pretty much move these all over the place. And...as far as names...I give chords names like "that icky one" or "that creepy one" or "that pretty one" :lol:
 

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Premium Member
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3,930 Posts
My pinky is only 2.75" :lol: I'm playing it on my Ibanez which has the standard scale length(25.5"). I always thought I had a small pinky.
 

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Premium Member
Joined
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3,930 Posts
I stole these right out of Hemispheres:

E-----
B-----
G-2--
D-2--
A-4--
E-2--

E----
B----
G----
D-4-
A-2-
E-3-
 

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Retarded P.A Overlord.
Joined
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14,248 Posts
This might already have been posted, but meh :lol:
With my band I've been trying some odd stuff, one I figured out was originally on a 6 string in drop tuning, it was;

E -5---
B -6---
G -3---
D -3---
A -3---
D -3---

But now we're in dropped A on a 7 it's just

E-----
B-5---
G-5---
D-3---
A-3---
E-3---
A-3---
 

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Jesterhead
Joined
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4 Posts
Awesome thread--it's fun playing through all of these bizarre chords one after another. I've used a lot of these myself.

I love just playing a power chord with an extra interval or another power chord tossed on top at a minor interval. It almost always sounds good! Here are a few I used in one song (though I did split a few between two guitars to cut down on dissonance / make them easier to play live):

E|---|
B|---|
G|---|
D|-9-|
A|-6-|
E|-4-|

E|---|
B|---|
G|-3-|
D|-1-|
A|-4-|
E|-2-|

E|-----|
B|-----|
G|-16-|
D|-13-|
A|-13-|
E|-11-|
 

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Read Only
Joined
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3 Posts
Awesome thread--it's fun playing through all of these bizarre chords one after another. I've used a lot of these myself.

I love just playing a power chord with an extra interval or another power chord tossed on top at a minor interval. It almost always sounds good! Here are a few I used in one song (though I did split a few between two guitars to cut down on dissonance / make them easier to play live):

E|---|
B|---|
G|---|
D|-9-|
A|-6-|
E|-4-|
G#-D#-B = G# Minor. This is called an open chord because the three notes of the chord span more than one octave. A closed chord is one where all three notes of the chord are in the same octave.

E|---|
B|---|
G|-3-|
D|-1-|
A|-4-|
E|-2-|
F#-C#-D#-A# = D#min7

E|-----|
B|-----|
G|-16-|
D|-13-|
A|-13-|
E|-11-|
D#-A#-D#-B = D#add6. This is neither major nor minor because it has no third.
 

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Resident Winger Overlord
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4,287 Posts
Il have to give these a go. I've been looking for some evil, aliens harvesting humans type chords... If that makes any sense. Thanks for putting these up.
Mostly I've been using this

E--
B--
G---
D--
A--2
E---3

This type

And just moving it around. Sounds a bit more what I'm looking for than typical power chording
 

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Bro of Bros, Bro.
Joined
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15,373 Posts
Il have to give these a go. I've been looking for some evil, aliens harvesting humans type chords... If that makes any sense. Thanks for putting these up.
Mostly I've been using this

E--
B--
G---
D--
A--2
E---3

This type

And just moving it around. Sounds a bit more what I'm looking for than typical power chording
That really just part of a triad, namely a G Maj triad, and moving it up and down will put you in the triad portion of whatever root note you're building off of. Those are fun chords, match up good with minors, ie:

A---5
E---7
 

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Resident Winger Overlord
Joined
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4,287 Posts
Thanks!
I'm trying to step outside of my typical writing style... And sometimes I just forget about this stuff until I'm reminded
 

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Registered
Joined
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1 Posts
Hello Everyone,
This is a great question and I love where you’re going here. The world desperately needs decent rhythm guitarists.
The way to learn how to play it is by playing a lot of rhythm guitar.
You’re not going to learn rhythm guitar by reading articles or passively watching videos. You’re going to learn it by copying the styles of great rhythm guitarists. If you copy enough of them, you will eventually find your own style. That’s how every great musician ever has found their own style: imitation of as many sources as possible.
You need a crash course in serious rhythm, and that means you have to listen to heavily rhythmic music, and as far as I’m concerned, that means funk, soul and R&B, and I mean vintage soul and R&B. Motown and Stax, and James Brown. Nothing against contemporary soul and R&B, but you may as well go back to the classics since they’re what the modern stuff is usually sampling anyway.
Seek out the work of guitarists such as Jimmy Nolen, Catfish Collins, Joe Messina, Robert White, Eddie Willis, Alex Weir, Steve Cropper, Nile Rodgers. Find out what recordings these guys played on, learn their parts, and play them until you have them in your right arm, your spine and, to be blunt, your ass. You need to learn to dance with the music. A great rhythm guitarist needs to hear what the bass and drums are doing, and work with them on the top end. Your job is to complete the groove that the bass and drums are setting up. You need to learn how to leave space, how to keep a steady groove going, and most importantly you need to build up stamina in your right arm so you can keep it going for a long time. Only practice does that. If you feel like listening to Afrobeat musicians like Fela Kuti, by all means do so. His guitarists (and guitarists in many kinds of African pop music generally) have forgotten more about rhythm guitar than most of us ever learn.
Learn to think like a drummer, and like a bass player. Hit the chords like you’re playing the drum part. Don’t worry too much about playing nice notes. Aim for rhythm and pulse more than lovely chiming chords. Learn when to mute and when to let chords ring.
Once you’ve got the groove in your arm, you can broaden yourself out a bit and listen to other rhythm guitarists. John Lennon was a great rhythm guitarist: he’s not great for a beginner to listen to because it’s hard for a beginner to hear how good he is, but he always plays a part, he never just strums. Keith Richards blurs the line between rhythm and lead, but basically, he’s a master of rhythm. Pete Townshend and Peter Buck are wonderfully inventive rhythm players. Jimmy Page is, in my opinion, a greater rhythm guitarist than soloist. Malcolm Young of AC/DC is a master rhythm player, and he’s the guy who came up with that band’s great riffs, not his showboating younger brother Angus. Of more recent bands, the guys in Radiohead are superb rhythm players. I can’t speak about metal, as that’s like a separate kind of music, when it comes to rhythm playing.
You should at some point listen to Freddie Green, Count Basie’s guitarist, a man so committed to rhythm guitar that I think you can count his recorded solos on the fingers of two hands. Green’s style of playing takes rhythm guitar to an extreme in that he’s barely audible but you know he’s there, changing chords on every beat, always fluid, always inventive, always rock solid.
Lead guitarists are admired and sucked up to, but rhythm guitarists are the guys who make songs that are loved.

Cheers!!
 
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