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I don't like it.
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11,071 Posts
I love how he blames it all on piracy, not services like iTunes or Amazon or whatever else distributes music on the Internet easily and cheaply.
 

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NSLALP
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13,286 Posts
Pretty shitty attempt at economics, if you ask me. Guess what? Business models change with time and market conditions. Suck it up and get used to it. Don't point to one thing that has changed and blow it out of proportion like it's ruining modern music as we know it.

As long as people value live music, it will be available. Notice that huge venues across the country consistently sell out for big acts, just like they used to. If the ticket prices have inflated, so what? We're paying less for the copies we listen to at home and in the car, aren't we?
 

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I don't like it.
Joined
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11,071 Posts
Pretty shitty attempt at economics, if you ask me. Guess what? Business models change with time and market conditions. Suck it up and get used to it. Don't point to one thing that has changed and blow it out of proportion like it's ruining modern music as we know it.

As long as people value live music, it will be available. Notice that huge venues across the country consistently sell out for big acts, just like they used to. If the ticket prices have inflated, so what? We're paying less for the copies we listen to at home and in the car, aren't we?
Also, ticket prices are mainly inflating for the big name shows, when it comes to the more obscure stuff, 15 bucks usually gets you in the door.
 

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Is Actually Recording
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32,765 Posts
Pretty shitty attempt at economics, if you ask me.
:agreed:

The best of it is, he doesn't actually really state his thesis, that ticket prices ARE going up because of piracy:

So, is piracy responsible for higher ticket prices? Like most things in this industry, the answer is quite complicated. But the devaluation of recordings is factoring into the current concert crisis more than it would seem.
That's about as ambiguous as you can get. His whole argument is tenuous. I could probably build a stronger case than he does, and I don't necessarily know if I believe him.
 

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I don't like it.
Joined
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11,071 Posts
:agreed:

The best of it is, he doesn't actually really state his thesis, that ticket prices ARE going up because of piracy:

That's about as ambiguous as you can get. His whole argument is tenuous. I could probably build a stronger case than he does, and I don't necessarily know if I believe him.
The other problem with this op-ed is the complete lack of facts and numbers to back up his claim. It's all opinion, nothing more.
 

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Is Actually Recording
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32,765 Posts
The other problem with this op-ed is the complete lack of facts and numbers to back up his claim. It's all opinion, nothing more.
It's not even opinion - the guy never states it as anything clearer than a vague hunch. It'd be one thing if he had the balls to state his thesis with some conviction, but he doesn't even go that far.
 

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Registered
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6,968 Posts
And, artists started leaning disproportionately on touring to generate more and more revenue. This is partly why they demand such a huge cut from the ticket price!
Not cause, like, the artist is the reason why people go to the concert or anything...
 

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Premium Member
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367 Posts
Yep, this article is fail. The contradictory "economics" made me laugh a little.

1) How does a FALL in the demand for concerts lead to RISING prices?

2) Wouldn't the recession affect CD sales anyway as well as concert tickets? If the consumers have less money, they have to spend less on SOMETHING no matter what. And the recession would cause ticket prices to be LOWER than they would be otherwise, so I'm not sure why he even mentioned it in an article about the exact opposite.

3) One theory that could explain a rise in ticket prices is this: since people AREN'T spending nearly as much money on CDs, they will have more to spend on tickets/merch than they would otherwise. This would represent a shift in consumer demand away from CD's and towards live shows (makes sense since CDs are no longer required to enjoy music). In other words, the price hikes are perfectly justified and reflect the demand of the fans. Why is this inherently bad or undesirable? People are voluntarily choosing to pay less for CDs and more for tickets, and hopefully the extra ticket revenues are going to the artist.
 

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3) One theory that could explain a rise in ticket prices is this: since people AREN'T spending nearly as much money on CDs, they will have more to spend on tickets/merch than they would otherwise. This would represent a shift in consumer demand away from CD's and towards live shows (makes sense since CDs are no longer required to enjoy music). In other words, the price hikes are perfectly justified and reflect the demand of the fans. Why is this inherently bad or undesirable? People are voluntarily choosing to pay less for CDs and more for tickets, and hopefully the extra ticket revenues are going to the artist.
While this is a valid point to defend the rise in ticket prices, it really shouldn't cause them directly. Customers spending less on their at-home media doesn't necessarily mean we have more to spend ON LIVE SHOWS. That would assume our basket of goods (<==remember that phrase from econ?:rolleyes:) consists of: CDs, concert tickets, and....nothing else.

Really what's happening is a shift in the entire industry and the way it relates to consumers. To point a finger at any one facet is ridiculous. The customer's approach to music is much different today than it was 20, even 10 years ago. I have tons of music I would never have purchased on CD back in the 90s, because maybe its Banarama's "Cruel Summer" and I don't need anyone to know I have it, or maybe its because I like one song off the CD, but not enough to warrant the 15 dollar purchase. There's far more exposure now. But just because my iTunes library is bigger, more diverse, and more pirated--hah!--than my older brother's CD collection doesn't change that there are particular artists I prefer and will shell out the cash when they come to my city.

Plus, a big reason ticket prices go up when sales go down is because concerts aren't like other products that can be stored with no expiration date. They're a one time deal that comes with tons of guarantees for artists, vendors, etc. They have a small window to make back their investment so if sales are in the toilet for one show, the next one they'll be hedging their bets with small price bump.
 
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