Metal Guitarist Forums banner

1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
OldSchool Blacksmith
Joined
·
2,866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·


I played one of these at GC the other day and it sounded pretty nice. For a single cutaway, which I'm not much for, I thought it looked kinda cool, too. What put me off was it had the fattest neck I've ever touched. I think my comment to my buddy I was with was along the lines of "It's like someone sawed a Louisville Slugger in half and slapped frets on it." Granted, I'm all about my Wizard necks and certainly no shredmeister, but I don't see how you could play on such a strangely thick neck.

Got me thinking, are there folks who actually prefer really, REALLY fat necks? If so, what about 'em works for you?
 

·
Forum MVP
Joined
·
4,767 Posts
No! Fat necks are fine if you have large hands and they can sound real good too... but that thing is hidiously ugly and shouldnt be allowed to soil the hands of a RG owner IMHO.
 

·
Hates Richie Kotzen
Joined
·
14,719 Posts
Eh, I file neck carve under "a poor carpenter blames his tools".

I sold a guitar early on because its neck wasn't thin enough to be considered "trendy" and I mistakenly thought it was going to hold me back. Still ashamed over that decision. I think you outgrow caring about that in the first year or two of playing.

I've never really played a guitar with a neck carve worth complaining about. If you have really small hands, yeah of course it's going to make a difference, but for the vast majority of players its a non issue.

It's only electric players/steel string acoustic players I see bitching about it too. I've never seen classical guitarists or violinists/cellists/whatever making a big deal out of it. Classical guitars have massive flat necks and people still rip it up on those.

There's a million other things that come into play before neck carve/neck size start to matter. Fret size, string tension, bridge recessed/non recessed etc. etc. etc.

Not to mention the dudes who I always see bitching about neck width are the guys who play with really unnatural posture where they have to hold their fretting hand up so the arm is in a V shape.



vs.



 

·
Hates Richie Kotzen
Joined
·
14,719 Posts
But yeah, if you buy into the "You are never supposed to bring your thumb over the top of the neck" classical technique, carve matters a lot more and you are never going to be comfortable. I spent my first two years playing like that and everything started going way better when I went with whatever felt natural (bringing my thumb over the top all the time). That rule really only applies to classical, the people that try to propagate it to electric are insane.
 

·
OldSchool Blacksmith
Joined
·
2,866 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I could see hand size/finger length being a thing. I'm a bit of a mutant with larger hands but short fingers. The fat necks just don't feel comfortable to me, but chances are I'd get used to one if I had no other choice. Thankfully, my two Sabers fit me perfectly.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,927 Posts
I prefer fatter neck carves, now. The typical Jackson Soloist neck carve is the thinnest I can play comfortably, now, and I was even starting to have problems with those when I was practicing more often.

Fatter necks generally sound better, too, IMHO.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
Eh, I file neck carve under "a poor carpenter blames his tools".

I sold a guitar early on because its neck wasn't thin enough to be considered "trendy" and I mistakenly thought it was going to hold me back. Still ashamed over that decision. I think you outgrow caring about that in the first year or two of playing.

I've never really played a guitar with a neck carve worth complaining about. If you have really small hands, yeah of course it's going to make a difference, but for the vast majority of players its a non issue.

It's only electric players/steel string acoustic players I see bitching about it too. I've never seen classical guitarists or violinists/cellists/whatever making a big deal out of it. Classical guitars have massive flat necks and people still rip it up on those.

There's a million other things that come into play before neck carve/neck size start to matter. Fret size, string tension, bridge recessed/non recessed etc. etc. etc.

Not to mention the dudes who I always see bitching about neck width are the guys who play with really unnatural posture where they have to hold their fretting hand up so the arm is in a V shape.



vs.



+1

Even tho... I dont like too fat necks. But I have pretty short fingers, so it's not weird.
Other than that, I'm fine with just about anything

Also, some technical shit pretty much requires the hand to be postured in that weird way like the guy with green guitar.
I try to avoid playing stuff like that :lol:
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
2,581 Posts
Eh, I file neck carve under "a poor carpenter blames his tools".

I sold a guitar early on because its neck wasn't thin enough to be considered "trendy" and I mistakenly thought it was going to hold me back. Still ashamed over that decision. I think you outgrow caring about that in the first year or two of playing.

I've never really played a guitar with a neck carve worth complaining about. If you have really small hands, yeah of course it's going to make a difference, but for the vast majority of players its a non issue.

It's only electric players/steel string acoustic players I see bitching about it too. I've never seen classical guitarists or violinists/cellists/whatever making a big deal out of it. Classical guitars have massive flat necks and people still rip it up on those.

There's a million other things that come into play before neck carve/neck size start to matter. Fret size, string tension, bridge recessed/non recessed etc. etc. etc.

Not to mention the dudes who I always see bitching about neck width are the guys who play with really unnatural posture where they have to hold their fretting hand up so the arm is in a V shape.



vs.



I'm 6'4 with the hands to match it. If you play with your thumb in the middle of the neck and not cupping the neck there shouldn't be an issue. it doesnt matter how big your hands are, dont play with your thumb hanging over the neck. Its not good technique. Its comfortable but sloppy
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,286 Posts
I'm 6'4 with the hands to match it. If you play with your thumb in the middle of the neck and not cupping the neck there shouldn't be an issue. it doesnt matter how big your hands are, dont play with your thumb hanging over the neck. Its not good technique. Its comfortable but sloppy
Since when was Paul Gilbert sloppy

(or Hetfield for that matter)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,157 Posts
I always play with my thumb over the neck and I'm not about to change. I use it to my advantage all the time. To fret the low E in different chord shapes, to mute the low E...and it never seemed to do Hendrix any harm. Mark Holcomb from Periphery is a more modern example of how playing with your thumb over the neck can be used at your advantage. He uses it to fret notes all the time.

And I love thick necks. Fatter the better. They're just so much more comfortable for me nowadays. I definitely feel it's a big ingredient in your overall tone too. You should check out the Richie Kotzen Tele if you want a fat neck, that thing really is like a baseball bat.
 

·
Safe Spaces Advocate
Joined
·
3,125 Posts
I thought I was into thinner necks... I really did.

Maybe it's that my hands are getting older - I'm not sure - but I find myself gravitating toward a more rounded neck profile. I'm still not pleased with the "baseball bat" profile, but the LP Traditional I have has a 50's neck and while it took a bit of getting used to, I can play more comfortably than ever on that style. I'm also looking at a Strat with a rounder profile.

The Wizard neck and the thinner style "shredder" necks, if you will, make my hands and wrists ache after a while. I think I mentioned that once before.

So - yeah, I can see someone going for a rounder neck. There are, in fact, guys who look for that baseball bat neck on older fiddles.
 

·
Mod Britannia
Joined
·
7,233 Posts
I used to always go for super thin necks, and while I still prefer them, I don't mind a slightly thicker neck now. Still not a huge fat neck, but something slightly meatier than a Wizard is ok with me. The Jackson Death Warrior I had remains the guitar with the fattest neck I have ever played, it really was like a baseball bat. Made the guitar sound MASSIVE, but not fun to play.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
2,581 Posts
Since when was Paul Gilbert sloppy

(or Hetfield for that matter)
They're not but for the average person it will take more time and practice to play clean like that. In music school you would get points off during the school's annual competition if you played like that.
 

·
...
Joined
·
18,790 Posts
They're not but for the average person it will take more time and practice to play clean like that. In music school you would get points off during the school's annual competition if you played like that.
Because music schools have to grade you on something, so they have to make things objective and "factual". In reality, there's no objectively correct or incorrect way to make music, as long as it sounds good to someone (hopefully at least yourself :lol: ). This is speaking as someone who went through a recording school.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
2,581 Posts
Because music schools have to grade you on something, so they have to make things objective and "factual". In reality, there's no objectively correct or incorrect way to make music, as long as it sounds good to someone (hopefully at least yourself :lol: ). This is speaking as someone who went through a recording school.
I find it more difficult to play with thumb hanging over. I use the thumb as a pivot point. Similar to playing piano and using your elbow to guide your wrists
 

·
Imp Slap
Joined
·
2,033 Posts
My hands aren't very big and I prefer thicker necks. I wouldn't want to go any thinner than my AS Telecaster, and I'd prefer a thicker neck on that. I find it easier to dig into the strings with a fatter neck and bigger frets.

I don't know about the those ZW guitars (not for me), but the 1955 Epiphone LPC (the one with P90s) has the biggest neck I think I've played. I'm curious to see what the ZW necks are like, but I don't think any stores near me stock them.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,927 Posts
I move my thumb around behind the neck depending on what I'm playing. For more technical picking I'm pretty close to classical form, but my style involves lots of whole-step bends and pre-bends that benefit from having the thumb used for leverage. I rarely go the full Hendrix and have my thumb hanging over/above the fretboard--I find that really uncomfortable.
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top